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      July Supporter Giveaway   07/01/2019

      It's Christmas in July! The winner of the July Supporter giveaway will receive this beautiful Barnes & Noble edition of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, as well as a special Charles Dickens tea by  theliteraryteacompany.co.uk .   I've been keeping this book a secret for so long (I couldn't wait until Christmas!) It's actually from a really lovely independent bookshop in Hay-on-Wye, the town of books. I'm so glad I finally get to show you! The picture doesn't even do it justice. A nice feature that you can't see in this image - the page edges are gold and (an extra surprise for the winner) the back is just as beautiful as the front! We also now have twice as much tea as previous giveaways!  (Thank you Literary Tea Company!)   As always, supporters are automatically entered into the giveaway and a winner will be chosen at random at the end of the month. If you want to enter this giveaway but you aren't a supporter, you can join in here https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum .   Good luck  
Brian.

Brian's Book Log - Ongoing

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Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

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Synopsis
Summers span decades. Winter can last a lifetime. And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.

As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand. His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must … and a dead enemy is a thing of beauty.

The old gods have no power in the south, Stark’s family is split and there is treachery at court. Worse, the vengeance-mad heir of the deposed Dragon King has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities. He claims the Iron Throne.

(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

I seems like pretty much every reader I know read this book years ago so I am a little late to the party here. I have watched the first 6 (I think) seasons of the TV show so I knew the story going in. This left me feeling quite apprehensive about how much I would like the book. The vast majority of times the book is always better than the screen adaptation but as the show is pretty much universally loved, I was worried how it would stand up? I was also worried that some of the characters in the book would deviate from the characters on screen a lot and cause some kind of disconnect in my head.

 

My first thought was, 'this is a big book'. My edition comes in at 801 pages long, with the story actually spanning 780 pages. The back contains a family tree of all the main houses in the book which I did find myself referring to on occasion. I won't go into the plot as I'm sure everyone has at least a passing awareness of it by now but needless to say, it's a tale of plotting and treachery taking inspiration from the wars of the roses. I didn't need to be worried about the book because after 20 pages of so I settled right into it and it pretty much flew by. For me personally the TV series added to my enjoyment of the book and in my head the look of the characters was the same as those on the TV show. I did notice that some of the younger female characters were depicted as older in the TV series, in my opinion perfectly justifiably. Depicting the rape, marriage and pregnancy of a 14 year old in print is probably easier to get away with than it is on TV. Perhaps unfairly I would put that down to the maturity of the average reader compared to the average maturity seen in mass TV viewership. I wouldn't have a problem with the depiction in either media format as long as it's not done to titillate and actually sits with the general tone set. 

 

Is the writing great? I don't think so, but it works perfectly well and the strength of the book lies in the plot and the character investment. Would I have enjoyed the book as much if I hadn't seen any of the TV series? I'm not sure about that, but I do think I would have lost track of some of the smaller characters in the book as there are loads of them. This is a constant issue I have with books that have loads of characters, so it probably says more about me than it does the book. I did occasionally google the character names on my phone to see who they were in the TV series. As soon as I saw the face it clicked with me and I thought 'ah, ok I recognise him/her'. Will I read the next book in the series? Probably, but I won't be in a rush to get through them, I can see myself reading one or two books a year to complete the series.

 

4/5 (I really enjoyed it).

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2 hours ago, Brian. said:

I've now officially had my best ever year in terms of amount read. In 2013 I finished the year with 79 books reads (22280 pages) which has been my highest until last night. Even though I am only at 66 books, I have read 22369 pages and we still have about 6 weeks of the year left to go.

 

Awesome, congratulations :)!

 

Great review of A Game of Thrones! I agree, the books are long and contain a lot of characters. I also find it hard to keep track of everyone. I've read all 5 main books but have only seen up to episode 3 of season 5. I'll probably eventually go back and watch more of the TV show, but I've sort of lost interest for the time being. I enjoyed the books more than the TV series at the time, I find the violence and nudity easier to deal with in the books than in the TV show. But we all know, it'll be some time before book 6, and book 7, are released and the series will be finished. I can't quite remember some of the stuff that happened in book 5, to be honest. I'll probably go back to the TV series at some point and continue watching it. I hope you enjoy reading more of the books when you feel in the mood for them. It makes sense to space them out, ie. only read 1 - 2 a year.

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Glad you enjoyed it, book 2 is quite different in tone, probably a bit clunky at times although the battle of Blackwater is brilliantly described, and book 3 is my favourite, 4 is OK but I thought that book 5 was pretty stodgy, way too long.  Good luck with them!

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As promised I will be uploading some pictures of my Folio Society books. I'll start today with Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

 

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And I, Robot by Isaac Asimov

 

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Edited by Brian.

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Ooh they are very nice. They're in such perfect condition too! I love the colour and font for the spine of Crime and Punishment

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On 11/14/2018 at 1:53 PM, Madeleine said:

Glad you enjoyed it, book 2 is quite different in tone, probably a bit clunky at times although the battle of Blackwater is brilliantly described, and book 3 is my favourite, 4 is OK but I thought that book 5 was pretty stodgy, way too long.  Good luck with them!

 

I agree, book 3 is my favourite also! After that they started to decline a bit.

 

@Brian. Those books look very nice! Such nice colours :).

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On 14/11/2018 at 8:45 AM, Brian. said:

I've now officially had my best ever year in terms of amount read. In 2013 I finished the year with 79 books reads (22280 pages) which has been my highest until last night. Even though I am only at 66 books, I have read 22369 pages and we still have about 6 weeks of the year left to go.

 

Well done!  I'm particularly interested in the fact that whereas most people count books, you're focusing on pages read, something I've done more so this past few years.  As a result, I've found that, a bit like you if further behind, whilst this year I've read just 58 books so far compared to the 65 at this stage in 2016 (the year of my end of year total of 80), I am, in terms of pages, around 800 pages ahead (19700 vs 18900).

Of course, if one was really concerned about accurate comparison, we'd perhaps need to go an even further level down:  one book I'm currently reading (Churchill by Roy Jenkins) is averaging around 500 words per page, whilst another I've just finished (C is for Corpse by Sue Grafton) came in at around 300 words per page.......but there lies madness, I suppose!

 

 

Edited by willoyd

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The reason I started to lean more towards pages read rather than books was that I wanted to read more long books. For years I avoided anything bigger than 600 pages as I found them intimidating. This year I read War and Peace and while I didn't love it, I did enjoy it and it lead me to want to tackle other biggies like Ulysses. 

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The Troubled Man by Henning Mankell

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Synopsis
Every morning Håkan von Enke takes a walk in the forest near his apartment in Stockholm. Then, one day he fails to come home.

Detective Kurt Wallander is not officially involved but Håkan's son is engaged to his daughter Linda. A few months earlier Håkan was eager to talk to Kurt about a controversial incident from his past. Could this be connected to his disappearance? 

When Håkan's wife also goes missing, Wallander is determined to uncover the truth but the investigation will force him to look back over his own past, as he comes to the unsettling realisation that even those we love the most can remain strangers to us...
(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

In 2013 I decided to see what all the fuss was about and picked up the first book in the Wallander series. At the time I was aware that there were two TV productions based on the books but I had actively avoided them because I wanted to read the books first. I enjoyed that book a lot and over the course of the next five and a half years I steadily worked my way through the series. 

 

So it was with a mixture of anticipation and sadness that I finally reached the last book in the series.I want to be careful and avoid any spoilers so I won't go into the book in any real depth here. The story this time revolves around an investigation Wallander is carrying out away from his duties as a policeman. In fact this book involves very few of his police colleagues and is much more of a family affair. I have to admit that the plot isn't great and we are left with a lot of loose ends why the mystery is finally concluded. However, the beauty in this book is the way we explore Wallander's (and maybe Mankell's) emotions on nearing the end of his life. He has reached his 60's, his health is failing him, and his relationships with others is not the best. He is left reflecting on what the future might hold and one thing really stuck in my mind. He has to buy a suit for a funeral and is grumbling about the cost. Linda, his daughter, points out that it is a good investment because at his age he will be going to far more funerals than weddings.

 

The end of the book left me with a real feeling of sadness in a way that I rarely experience with books. My final rating for the book is probably more reflective of the whole series than this individual book and I can see myself re-visiting the series in the future.

 

Goodbye Wallander. 

 

5/5 (I loved it).

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Sad to say goodbye to the series :(. I was a bit shook when I heard the author had passed away. I still have a lot of the series to read (though I don't own all of them yet) myself, but I can imagine it's hard to say bye to a series that's been with you for a long time.

 

The last two paragraphs of your review make me feel emotional.. I love the way you wrote it all down. It's true that as one gets older, there will be more funerals. I talk to a family friend now and then, she's over 70, and we've talked about this. She has told me she's found it difficult sometimes. She's lost so many (older or same-age) friends and relatives.

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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche

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Synopsis
'What is it I hope for from this book? To inspire a quiet revolution in the whole way we look at death and care for the dying and the whole way we look at life, and care for the living'

Written by Buddhist meditation master and popular international speaker Soygal Rinpoche, this highly acclaimed book clarifies the majestic vision of life and death that underlies the Tibetan tradition. It includes not only a lucid, inspiring and complete introduction to the practice of meditation but also advice on how to care for the dying with love and compassion, and how to bring them help of a spiritual kind. But there is much more besides in this classic work, which was written to inspire all who read it to begin the journey to enlightenment and so become 'servants of peace' working in the world.

(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

I think this book has sat on my physical TBR longer than any other book I have owned, somewhere in the region of 10 years. Since then I have tried to read it several times, each time not getting more than 50 pages into it before having to put it aside. I always put it aside due to the fact it is pretty heavy going, this is not a book to read when you are tired or distracted. In recent months my reading has been going great so I decided to pick it up again and this time to finish it. Along the way I also read something lighter to give me some entertainment when I felt a big bogged down.

 

Looking at reviews of the book online it appears that it does live up the claim on the cover, it is widely regarded as a spiritual classic. My forays online also revealed something that I was unaware of. Sogyal Rinpoche has been implicated is a sexual abuse scandal involving his female disciples. He took advantage of his position of master and as a result has been widely shunned by the Tibetan Buddhist community. This put me in a bit of an awkward situation, I wanted to read the book but felt his actions are very contradictory with regards to his message. I felt I should plow on with the book though and see what it had to offer.

 

Sadly for me the book was a miss despite it being loved by many people. I have had an interest in Buddhist for most of my adult life but I wouldn't really consider myself a religious person. I am agnostic by nature and one thing I have always admired about Buddhism is the message to make use of what you find value in and let the rest go. Unquestionable belief is not a requirement and I find this comforting. This book contained far too many tales of miracles and mystical woo woo for my liking. The parts about compassion, empathy, and caring for the dying were fantastic but too often they were packaged with unbelievable 'facts'. If i had been a fully signed up Buddhist with a leaning towards the Tibetan traditions I'm sure I would have loved this book.

 

Large sections of the book are very pressing on the importance of the master-disciple relationship. This was uncomfortable reading as it is easy to see in hindsight how he has used these beliefs take advantage of women by giving them 'special teachings'. For the relationship to work I would imagine there has to be complete trust and as someone who held such a highly respected position to abuse this trust is unforgivable. This is even more troubling when you consider many people went to him for guidance on dealing with death of either themselves or their loved ones.

 

2/5 (It was ok).

 

Edited by Brian.

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Great review.

I sympathise with you about the miracles, things which, though I love the compassion of Buddhism, I can never believe, as they never happened.

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On 16.11.2018 at 4:02 PM, Brian. said:

The reason I started to lean more towards pages read rather than books was that I wanted to read more long books. For years I avoided anything bigger than 600 pages as I found them intimidating. 

 

Same thing for me, always find it quite hard to convince myself to start reading something epically huge, but once I start - I won't stop, sheer stubborness will make me finish the book even if I don't really like it (though I'm not sure this is a wise attitude). I guess, that's because I like reading fast and 400-500 pages is a very comfortable amount of pages, the longest book I've read consciously (not because of the school programm withTolstoy and Dostoyevsky) is It by King and Gone with the wind.

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I'm always willing to dump a book if I don't like it but I do tend to give bigger books more time to work for me than shorter ones.

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Eating Smoke by Chris Thrall

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Synopsis
Chris Thrall left the Royal Marines to find fortune in Hong Kong, but following a bizarre series of jobs he ended up homeless and hooked on Crystal Meth. He began working for the 14K, the city's most notorious crime syndicate, as a nightclub doorman in the Wan Chai red-light district. Heavily in psychosis, he uncovered a huge global conspiracy, made all the more confusing by the 'Foreign Triad' - a secretive expat clique in cahoots with the Chinese mafia. Desperate, addicted and alone in the neon glare of Hong Kong's seedy backstreets, Chris was forced to survive in the world's most unforgiving city, addicted to the world's most dangerous drug. Engaging, honest and full of Chris's irrepressible humour, this remarkable memoir combines gripping storytelling with brooding menace as the Triads begin to cast their shadow over him. The result is a truly psychotic urban nightmare.
(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

This book was an impulse buy from the internet and I can't recall how I came across it. Two things appealed to me about it. Firstly, I quite like true crime books especially those 'banged up abroad' type affairs. Secondly, the setting of Hong Kong intrigued me. I know little about Hong Kong and watching the recent TV series 'Strangers' has piqued my interest even if the TV was ultimately a big let down for me.

 

We pretty much start straight away in Hong Kong and stay there for the entire book. There are occasional mentions of Thrall's previous life before Hong Kong and a few people from his time in the marines pop up along the way but that is about all as far as back story goes. Initially the author is involved in selling computer chips and various other commodities in a boiler room kind of environment. The money isn't great but it's enough to live ok and enjoy life. There are some potentially big deals which could have made Thrall a very rich man but they never come off. I was left wondering how real this potential was or if it was a bit of a leap that the deals were potentially as good as he says. Thrall didn't take life too seriously and liked to indulge in drink and drugs, eventually partaking in crystal meth. Inevitably there follows a spiral into drug addiction, job-loss, homelessness, and psychosis.

 

I thought the book was OK but I have read better books on similar subjects in the past. The one aspect which elevates the book from 2 stars to 3 is how Thrall's psychosis develops throughout the book. There is no indication as to what is fact and what is drug fueled fantasy. The story progresses until you reach a certain point at which a light bulb goes on and you realise that he is now fully in the grips of his psychosis. I would have liked some details about his recovery after escaping Hong Kong but sadly that is also omitted from the book.

 

Overall a decent and quick read but nothing special.

 

3/5 (I liked it).

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Knots & Crosses by Ian Rankin

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Synopsis
And in Edinburgh, of all places, I mean, you never think of that sort of thing happening in Edinburgh, do you...?

That sort of thing is the brutal abduction and murder of two young girls. And now a third is missing, presumably gone to the same sad end. Detective Sergeant John Rebus, smoking and drinking too much, his own young daughter spirited away south by his disenchanted wife, is one of the many policemen hunting the killer. And then the messages begin to arrive: knotted string and matchstick crosses - taunting Rebus with pieces of a puzzle only he can solve.

(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

After finishing the Wallander series of books I felt like I needed to find another detective series to fill the gap. Having already started the Harry Hole books by Jo Nesbo some time ago I felt that maybe I should go for someone closer to home. Ian Rankin was recently on the the 'Simon Mayo's Books of the Year' podcast and he sounded like a decent guy so I thought I'd give the Rebus books a go. I've spent some time living in Scotland and in particular I spent some time in Glasgow but I've never been to Edinburgh so this was an added bonus for me.

 

I don't really do proper 'reviews', more like a collection of my thoughts so here goes, first the positives. The first thing that struck me is how vividly Edinburgh comes across in the book. I could picture it very quickly in my minds eye and it almost feels like another character. Rankin is keen to impress that the Edinburgh of Rebus is very different to the one tourists see. On the surface Edinburgh is lovely and picturesque but in the background, unseen by most people is the dark underbelly. I really liked this as it didn't feel over done and the book didn't spend all its time there either. I also really liked the way that Rebus didn't come across as a superstar detective. In fact, the main break in the case doesn't come from him at all, it comes from a female colleague and that almost feels progressive given that the book was published in 1987. The time the book is written really stands out, there are no mobile phones, no computers to speak off, people smoke in their office, and everything feels very old fashioned and authentic. Had Rebus been put in a more modern setting  in his current state he just wouldn't work but in the 80's he is just another person.

 

Now for the negatives. I found the smoking, drinking, separated, haunted detective with a daughter who doesn't live with him a little tired. On reflection this may well just be that I am a little 'crimed' out at the moment having read a lot of crime fiction recently but it is a very common trope. I also found the plot device to reveal Rebus' past a bit clunky. It is more inventive than a simple flashback but to me it felt forced and didn't sit naturally in the story.

 

While I didn't love the book I did enjoy it and the fact it only took me 4  and a half hours to read it shows how well it is written. I will definitely read the next book in the series at some point in the future.

 

3.5/5 (I liked it).

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168 Hours by Laura Vanderkam

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Synopsis
It's an unquestioned truth of modern life: we are starved for time. We tell ourselves we'd like to read more, get to the gym regularly, try new hobbies, and accomplish all kinds of goals. But then we give up because there just aren't enough hours to do it all. Or if we don't make excuses, we make sacrifices- taking time out from other things in order to fit it all in.

There has to be a better way...and Laura Vanderkam has found one. After interviewing dozens of successful, happy people, she realized that they allocate their time differently than most of us. Instead of letting the daily grind crowd out the important stuff, they start by making sure there's time for the important stuff. When plans go wrong and they run out of time, only their lesser priorities suffer.

Vanderkam shows that with a little examination and prioritizing, you'll find it is possible to sleep eight hours a night, exercise five days a week, take piano lessons, and write a novel without giving up quality time for work, family, and other things that really matter.

(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

During the process of deciding what I want to concentrate on in 2019 I have read quite a few blogs posts about goals and goal setting. One of those I came across was a post by Laura Vanderkam detailing how she has logged how she spends her time for the last 3 years. The basic premise of the post was that by logging how you spend you time each week over the course of a few weeks you can identify places where you are unknowingly spending time on things you would rather not be. This concept isn't entirely new to me, I have logged my time over the course of 8 days (I work a 4 on, 4 off shift pattern) a few times in the past to see how I spend my time. I wanted to delve into the exploration of this a little better and decided to buy an ebook copy of her book based on this concept, 168 Hours.

 

The largest portion of Vanderkam's research is based on data she has collected by asking people to log their time. Some of these people she has given feedback to on what changes they can make, and on the whole this advise has seemed to work. The initial part of the book looks into how, in modern society, we all feel as though we are too busy and don't have anywhere near as much free time as generations past did. She also looks at the growing number of people who claim to log 70+ hour weeks on a regular basis and how realistic this is. These parts of the book are the best and also the parts which I enjoyed the most. The general belief is that these claims are not entirely accurate and there is a lot of data from various studies to back this up.

 

Sadly the rest of the book only managed to irritate me. Vanderkam goes into how we can spend more time doing what we want to do at some length and frankly most of these strategies are impractical at best. I won't go into all these strategies but I will pick apart some of them. First, pay someone to do your laundry and cook for you (or buy pre-made meals). Not only is this expensive but buying pre-made meals if you are not wealthy enough to get bespoke meal plans will lead to awful nutrition. Second, ditch a number of your friends and multitask other activities while spending time with those you decide to keep. I like to think most people wouldn't spend too much time with 'friends' they would ditch. Additionally, multitasking while spending time with people is plain rude and studies have shown that multitasking leads to poor concentration on both tasks. Third, figure out what your dream job is and do it. I am generally an optimistic person but the concept of everyone doing their dream job is pie in the sky nonsense. Even people who do jobs they really love such as sportsmen and women readily admit there are parts of their job they really don't like. If everyone did their perceived dream jobs who would be there to do the other jobs society needs to be filled? Fourth, and final one from me is to split your working time up to suit your own needs and schedule. This works if you are a freelancer writer but for most of the rest of us who work jobs with fixed hours it is impossible. If I approached my boss to work from home on a Friday or go home early and complete my hours at home in the evening he would laugh me out of his office. It is no coincidence that from memory, all the people she gathered time tracking data from were people with high-flying well paid jobs or freelancers with a second income coming into the family.

 

The final straw for me was her concept of planning your week ahead of time. This makes sense, I know I am far more productive when I have an idea of what I want to do and when. Schedule your important tasks first and then fit those less important tasks around the bigger ones. So far a solid and well known concept. However, Vanderkam takes in one step further to where she basically suggests scheduling every last minute of your days and don't worry about relaxation. I know from experience that this is a sure fire way to burn yourself out. There may be a small number of people who can operate this way for an extended length of time but for the vast majority of people this is not going to work. People need some time to decompress and if they choose to watch TV for an hour to do so then they should definitely do this. No one is advocating sitting in front of the TV (or whatever their chosen chill out activity is) for 4 hours a night every night, but zero relaxing scheduled is plain crazy.

 

The 2 stars I have given this are based on the fact that the first section is very good, and despite disagreeing with her arguments the book is well written. 

 

2/5 (It was OK).

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I've finished A Christmas Carol & Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens. I'm not going to do a review because I don't think there is anything I can say about Dickens that hasn't already been said. I did really enjoy it and I think it's a book that I will keep for re-reading again in the future. I did find it a little hard to read in places due to the age of the English used but that says more about my ability to concentrate rather than the book.

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Great reviews! You didn't like 168 hours much but I really liked reading your review of it :). Your analysis makes a lot of sense to me. I wouldn't want to pre-schedule every minute of all my time either.

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Interesting review of 168 hours, almost enough to make me want to read it as I can't quite believed that her suggestions are really as crass as you outline, but I wouldn't want to use time up doing something I really want to do!! ;)

 

I'm amazed that she seems to have completely missed the point that things like time for cooking, friends and relaxation are the priorities - sounds like she's proposing the sort of life I'm very glad to have retired from!  On a specific note, I was reading quite recently that there is actually evidence to suggest that multi-tasking is a myth, that what one actually does is quickly switch concentration from one task to another and back again.......and that it is this switching which tires the brain fastest.  I have enjoyed stripping out as much multi-tasking as I can from my life, and feel all the better for it (perhaps not realistic for some!).

 

Thanks for the review!

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I'd agree with you about the definition of multi-tasking Will, or, as I call it, jack of all trades and master of none!  But that just about sums it up perfectly.

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Willoyd, they almost certainly aren't as crass as I make out but I still believe my general point stands. The book irritated me so I was definitely playing devil's advocate a fair bit in my review.

 

I finished Touching the Void by Joe Simpson last night, review coming tomorrow.

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Touching the Void by Joe Simpson

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Synopsis
Touching the Void is the heart-stopping account of Joe Simpson's terrifying adventure in the Peruvian Andes. He and his climbing partner, Simon, reached the the summit of the remote Siula Grande in June 1995. A few days later, Simon staggered into Base Camp, exhausted and frost-bitten, with news that that Joe was dead.

What happened to Joe, and how the pair dealt with the psychological traumas that resulted when Simon was forced into the appalling decision to cut the rope, makes not only an epic of survival but a compelling testament of friendship.

(taken from Goodreads)


My Thoughts

One of my hobbies is hiking and hill walking, mainly in the Lake District, Peak District, and Wales. An extension of this is that I have a bit of a fascination of high mountaineering, especially peaks above 8000m. I've never done anything remotely approaching what I would consider proper mountaineering, I really hate the cold :giggle2: but I do like reading about expeditions. I know the story covered in the book well having watched a few documentaries and interviews on it in the past. This book is considered a mountaineering classic and I was lucky enough to be given a copy for my birthday.

 

The book is very simple in it's layout. There is no pre-expedition fluff, we start right at base came in Peru with the 3 people involved in the story, climbers Joe Simpson, Simon Yates, and a hiker called Richard who stays at base camp. The main aim of their trip is to summit Siula Grande, at an altitude of 6344m. The ascent of Siula Grande is covered in a lot detail and although you don't need any understanding of climbing, a little knowledge is helpful. Some reviewers have said they don't like the climbing intricacies that Simpson goes into but I enjoyed it, it gives a real impression of the grind involved in an expedition or summit attempt.

 

The book isn't all detail though, the gem is the emotion that Simpson conveys both before, and after the accident. Even though I knew the story I was gripped throughout constantly wondering how I would cope in a similar situation. There are a few small parts written by Yates where he details the mental anguish and process he went through as well after the accident. These are superb additions to the book and it clearly comes across that both men were irreparably changed forever. There are some photographs in the book and one in particular really grabbed me, a picture of Simon Yates looking haunted on his return to base camp. My edition has a revision added 10 years after the book was originally written where both men reflect on the mistakes they made, especially in their desire to carry as little as possible. They come to the conclusion that although accidents are always a risk, had they had better shelter and more gas to make hot drinks they could have avoided being in the situation that lead to the accident.

 

I really loved this book, I think it might be a keeper.

 

5/5 (It was great).

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