Jump to content
Raven

Raven's Reads

Recommended Posts

On 15/11/2019 at 11:27 PM, Raven said:

No, no typo!  I'm talking about the Benedict Cumberbatch series Sherlock that was on a few years ago.  Their take on HotB was... poor, to say the least.

 

 

I see what you meant now.  Thought that was meant to be either 'Brett' or 'Rathbone' instead of 'Sherlock'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Raven said:

The first series of Sherlock was very good and - with the excerption of Hounds - series two was as well. 

After that, however, it got a little up it's own bottom and went down the pan. 

Series three was poor and the Christmas special they did after that was a joke.

I cannot tell you about series four because I haven't watched it.

 

Pretty good summary! It lost me round about the same time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ur.jpg.fbcaed2cd8d5984b98d7160eb5264689.jpg

 

Unreliable Memoirs

By Clive James

 

Just squeaked over the line with 20 books for the year, the last one being Unreliable Memoirs from the late, great, Clive James.

 

For those who have not had the chance to read this, it is an account of James' life from childhood though to University and his leaving Australia for the UK in the early 60's. 

 

James knew how to spin a tale, and this book is chock full of them.  By his own admission this isn't an accurate autobiography, with a lot of the characters being facsimiles of real people and sometimes combinations of several, but that doesn't make it any less interesting for that.  Reading the book you get the impression James is his own harshest critic, but there is a lot to entertain, and he paints a vivid picture of what growing up in post-war Australia was like.

 

Highly recommended.

 

Volume 2 is Falling Towards England, but that may have to wait as I've picked up a few books over the last few days!

 

Edited by Raven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always enjoyed watching and listening to Clive James over the years, but (weirdly) never thought to read anything other than the odd article by him.

 

That may have to change! 

 Happy New Year Raven. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Chrissy said:

I always enjoyed watching and listening to Clive James over the years, but (weirdly) never thought to read anything other than the odd article by him.

 

That may have to change! 

 Happy New Year Raven. :)

 

Happy New Year to you too!

 

I can recommend his books, or at least the two I have read to date!

 

I've actually gone straight on with Falling Towards England myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/12/2008 at 12:43 PM, Raven said:

Wot I've Read in 2020:

 

Nuffin.

 

Stop judging me.

 

 

A slow start to the forum's longest running book blog. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Raven said:

 

A slow start to the forum's longest running book blog. 

Is yours really the longest running book blog?? Congratulations! I haven't finished a book yet either, but clearly I'm in good company :lol: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Raven said:

A slow start to the forum's longest running book blog. 

 

Wow, how cool you have the forum's longest running book blog!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Hayley said:

Is yours really the longest running book blog?? Congratulations! I haven't finished a book yet either, but clearly I'm in good company :lol: 

 

6 hours ago, Athena said:

Wow, how cool you have the forum's longest running book blog!!

 

It's amazing what you can achieve by not reading much or posting very often!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/01/2020 at 1:34 PM, Raven said:

It's amazing what you can achieve by not reading much or posting very often!

That would make it a lot easier to stay up to date with reviews :giggle2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Hayley said:

That would make it a lot easier to stay up to date with reviews :giggle2:

 

Long periods of posting no reviews at all tends to help as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Raven said:

 

Long periods of posting no reviews at all tends to help as well.

I'm already really good at that :blush::D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so here's a question for you charming peeps...

 

I always buy the Waterstones versions* of the Rivers of London books because they have a short story tagged on at the end.  I finished the main novel on Saturday night, and read the short story tonight, so I have - for the first time - listed both separately on my reading list. 

 

Is this a cheat? (even though I have marked up the latter as a short story?)

 

I'll reserve my opinion until others have commented! (always assuming someone does!).

 

*Hardback as well, as I can't wait for the paperbacks of these books!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the same thing with the last book and I think I left them together in the end, but I don't think it should feel like a cheat. They are always completely separate stories. We'd review it as a separate short story, so why not list it as one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it's a cheat to list them separately, especially if they are both separate stories. I've had such a situation once before, and I just listed it as one entry, but when you think about it, it does make sense to put it as two separate entries. When I read an omnibus that contains, say, two or three novels, I list them seperately too (then again with Fruits Basket Collector's Edition I don't, but that's also because it's not said in the book where one original volume ends and the next one begins so I couldn't say pagecounts for individual volumes). Anyway, I think it's definitely not a cheat, go for it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say it was completely up to you and how you feel about it.  If you think you're 'cheating', then you are, and if you don't, you aren't; when all said and done, this is not a competitive sport, and how you record your reading is up to you.

For my list, it is rather subjective.  I have included novellas like Christmas Carol, even though it's usually published as one story amongst several as Dickens' Christmas Stories, and some children's books as short as the Paddington novels (they take me about an hour so to read at most).  I think I've even included Asterix books - and they are a scant 64 pages or so long (and not many words, although I do try and read them in French so they take a bit longer than usual!).  But they are only occasional reads - not sure what I'd do if they and similar took up more of my reading - I don't think I'd count them as it really would give a false figure (for me). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your comments all.  

 

I hadn't really thought about it before reading False Values, because I usually go straight on and read the short story so I finish both of them on the same day, but in this case it was a few days before I could read A Dedicated Follower of Fashion, and it was so tonally different from False Values that I was already thinking of it as a separate from the main novel before I had finished it (which, of course, it was).

 

In the past where I have read novels that have been combined into single volumes (such as three of the Raymond Chandler books I've read over the last year or so) I've listed them separately because there have often been several books between the different novels.  I also have a Murakami book that contains two novels (Hear the Wind Sing and Pinball, 1973) that I will almost certainly list separately as well.

 

So, in summary, I don't think this is a cheat, and I'm happy to stick to listing them as I have!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shit.jpg.25a9b9e1dc712bcb1dd2abcc7485c382.jpg

 

The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind

By Jackson Ford
 
Teagan Frost can move things with her mind, but right now she's in a spot of bother because someone has been murdered and only someone with her specific skill set could have done it.  Can Teagan find whoever is responsible and clear her name before her Government employers catch up with her?
 
Yep, it is yet another Urban fantasy novel! (although I’m not sure if and how that term applies to a story where the main character has superpowers rather than a magical ability).
 
The book is set in modern day Los Angeles, and tells the story of a young girl with psychokinetic abilities (basically, she can move non-organic items just by thinking about it).  Teagan works for a covert government agency that – between official jobs – has a cover as a removal firm.  When framed for a murder she didn’t commit, she and her colleagues are forced to go on the run to try and clear her name and keep their agency from being closed down.  They are an ill-assorted group from the start, and a lot of the book revolves around their patching up their differences to get the job done. 
 
Though the plot is a little formulaic in places, the story is well told and paced and moves along quickly.   My only real quibble is that the end of the book seems to ramble a bit after the main plot has been resolved - this is the only place the story could be said to drag at all - and the conversation in the penultimate chapter definitely feels out of place (something that should have been covered in the next book, possibly?).
 
Teagan is likeable character; bolshie and sarcastic (or having plenty of “snark,” as I believe the Americans say) but she is also unsure of herself and her abilities which she feels places a barrier between her and those around her.  This combination keeps the character grounded and gets the reader onside with her pretty much from the start.  The supporting cast has a good mix of characters, which I think bodes well for future stories.
 
The cover of the book has a quote that describes it as being a cross between Alias and the X-Men, which makes me think the person being quoted was grasping for a spy show with a female lead because I couldn't see the link to Alias otherwise (the situations certainly don't compare and, if anything, Teagan is the polar opposite of Sydney Bristow!)  If I had to give a comparison, to go with the X-Men, I would possibly go with 24 for the pacing of the story, but that would be rather misleading as well.  If I was forced to draw a parallel of my own I would say the book feels like an American version of Paul Cornell’s Shadow Police series, but not quite as dark, and it also reminded me of Daniel O'Malley's The Checquy Files.
 
So, in summary, an entertaining read, and a good opener for what looks set to be a series of novels (which I believe are already being referred to as The Frost Files).
 
Book 2, Random Sh*t Flying Through the Air, is out in paperback in July.
 
Recommended (certainly for fans of this ever growing sub-genre).
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I forgot to add: Yes, I totally bought this based on the title alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adding to my 'to read' list! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×