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 Henrietta Sees It Through: More News From the Home Front 1942 - 45 by Joyce Dennys

A Bloomsbury Group book

 

A continuation of Henrietta's War and equally as enjoyable.

 

★★★★

Edited by poppy

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On ‎9‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 1:19 AM, itsmeagain said:

Eleanor Oliphant sounds very interesting Poppy.😅😂

 

It reminded me a little of The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion.

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Bombs On Aunt Dainty by Judith Kerr

 

Judith Kerr is the children's author of the Mog books and The Tiger Who Came To Tea, all delightfully written and illustrated by her. I particularly loved reading about Mog the cat, to children.

 

Bombs On Aunty Dainty is a YA semi-autobiographical book from a series of three. Like Judith, Anna is a German-Jew who escaped with her anti-Nazi family just before WW2 and were refugees in a number of countries before settling in Britain where this book is set.

Although aimed at a younger audience, I enjoyed this book and it gave some interesting insights into how hard it was to be a refugee of German descent in Britain during WW2, even when clearly holding anti-Nazi and anti-Fascist views (her father had written several books openly criticising the Nazis.)

 

★★★

 

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I like the look of this Poppy. I really enjoyed Sandi Toksvig's 'Hitler's Canary' when I read it, which is also aimed at a younger audience. 

 

Just looked it up, and hadn't realised that it is the 2nd in a trilogy. Such a shame that I will have to buy three new (to me) books. :D  :readingtwo:

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19 hours ago, Chrissy said:

I really enjoyed Sandi Toksvig's 'Hitler's Canary' when I read it, which is also aimed at a younger audience.

 

I'm glad you enjoyed this one! I picked it up at a library sale, it sounded interesting, but I hadn't heard any reviews about it, so it's nice to know someone I know, enjoyed it :).

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On ‎14‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 3:50 AM, Chrissy said:

I like the look of this Poppy. I really enjoyed Sandi Toksvig's 'Hitler's Canary' when I read it, which is also aimed at a younger audience. 

 

Just looked it up, and hadn't realised that it is the 2nd in a trilogy. Such a shame that I will have to buy three new (to me) books. :D  :readingtwo:

 

I'm not sure if I'll go on to read the other two although they are available in kindle form as a trilogy. I borrowed the ebook from the library. :)

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Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Arnim

 

I've been meaning to read this autobiographical book for some time as I've seen it recommended in several places. Elizabeth is English and marries a German Count (who she refers to as 'The Man of Wrath') and creates a garden at their home in the German countryside. She writes in a witty style but I imagine it would mainly appeal to those interested in gardening. She grows a large number of old-fashioned roses, of which I'm a fan, and it was interesting to see several I recognise. Interestingly, Katherine Mansfield was her cousin.

 

 ★★★

Edited by poppy

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Mrs Tim of the Regiment by D.E. Stevenson

A Bloomsbury Group Book

 

Mrs Tim writes in diary form covering a period of about 6 months. Written in the 1930's this doesn't feel particularly dated apart from the fact army wives had cooks, housemaids and nannys. Mrs Tim is witty and amusing and the characters are well drawn. In the second part of the book she holidays in Scotland with friends and I found some of this a ittle unbelievable, particularly her apparent oblivion to the fact she is being pursued by one of her husband's colleagues. A light and mostly enjoyable read.

 

★★★

 

 

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Mrs Ames by E. F. Benson

A Bloomsbury Group Book

 

The author of the Mapp and Lucia books, this has the same small British village setting with similar characters.  However, it's not nearly as lighthearted and humorous as the Mapp and Lucia books and at times I felt it rather belaboured the points Benson was trying to make and became long-winded. Benson is very good at witty dialogue and bringing the characters alive but they all seem to live shallow, dissatisfied lives. Perhaps that's the point he's making.

 

★★★

 

 

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