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Do you memorize poems ?


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#21 chesilbeach

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 02:49 PM

I don't even read poetry, much less memorise it, but I do know the first verse of She Walks In Beauty by Byron, just because it was part of scene in an episode of The Cosby Show that I've seen about a hundred times! Sorry, I'm a bit of a philistine when it comes to poetry, and I just don't understand it - nobody has ever been able to give me any sort of appreciation for it, so I'll just stick to the prose.  :out:



#22 Anna Begins

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:41 PM

I'm enjoying it very much, I love the characters already, especially Grace and Billy and I'm only about a quarter of the way through. I suspect I'm going to get very attached to Rayleen and Filipe as well. Muggle recommended it to me and he's never put me wrong yet :) 

And no, I haven't watched Dead Poet's Society. Is it good?

Ya, I had already read 2 of her books when he told me about Don't Let Me Go being even BETTER than the previous two.  I really want to read more of her stuff.  Yes, you would love Dead Poets Society- it's the story of an English teacher who inspires his students through his teaching of poetry (Robin Williams in a straight role).  (1989)



#23 Calexa

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 09:59 AM

I think I'd like to remember some poems that have stuck with me just for my own pleasure of mind. There are poems that have really resonated with me at certain points in my life, and it'd be nice to have those in the back of my mind which I can come back to whenever I am having difficulties. Plus there's a lot of nostalgia associated with some poems I have read in the past which bring up emotions. It's amazing how powerful words can be.

 

For your own pleasure, inspiration, as a warm fluffy security blanket and-or a set of wide verbal shoulders to help carry the burden are some of the best reasons to memorize a poem. :smile:

 

Words can weave the most beautiful dreams, and also etch the darkest of nightmares. Indeed words are powerful.



#24 vodkafan

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 12:20 PM

Oh wow. Memorize a poem? Like Claire, I would have to actually force myself to read one first!  

I did like one of Ben's poems. I don't remember the words but I remember the emotions it engendered.



#25 Calexa

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 08:44 AM

Oh wow. Memorize a poem? Like Claire, I would have to actually force myself to read one first!  

I did like one of Ben's poems. I don't remember the words but I remember the emotions it engendered.

 

I first learned poems out of necessity to satisfy educational requirements (mostly)...then as a teenager whilst reading the Carolingian bishop Theodulf of Orléans' Latin poetical works I found a deep affection for the poem delusa expextati.

 

 

grande habet initium cum res vilissima dictu,
tunc gignis murem, magne elephante, brevem.
sic patri quidam retulit sua somnia natus,
depromens animo frivola dicta suo:
"O pater, in somnis dicam quae mira videbam,
moverunt animum talia visa meum.
bos dabat humanas nostras hac nocte loquelas,
Ille loquebatur, nos stupebamus," ait.
tum pater attonitus rem sic inquirit ab illo:
"dic, quod dicebat,' intulit ille: "nihil."


Translation:

When momentous beginnings mere trifles espouse,
Then you, mighty elephant, bring forth a mouse.
A son told his father his dreams; thus he heard
What fell from his thoughts, every frivolous word:
“Father, I’ll say what I see in my mind.
The most troubling visions in sleep do I find:
An ox who could speak I encountered tonight.
He talked! We were rather amazed at the sight.”
Inquired the father, “What news did he bring?”
Answering him, he replied, “Not a thing.”


And I was hooked on poetry. Yes. Yes, I'm odd. :P
 


Edited by Calexa, 27 July 2014 - 08:44 AM.


#26 Angury

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 10:07 AM

I'm going to try and learn Dulce et decorum est by Wilfred Owen off by heart:

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime...
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.


And Funeral Blues by WH Auden:

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.
For nothing now can ever come to any good.



I like depressing poems. :D

 

Although I would also like to learn William Blake's Auguries of Innocence it may be a bit much for me.. I'm just concentrating on Dulce et decorum est at the moment.

I find that as you speak the poems out loud to try and memorise them the words take on a new meaning. Particularly with the first poem, you can almost feel as if you're standing in the trenches with the way each syllable slips off the tongue and joins the next. Plus you can experiment with different ways to say the poems out loud in terms of pace and tone, and place emphasis on different words to give each sentence a different meaning - it's rather fun!

I would love to be able to speak poetry like this:

https://m.youtube.co...h?v=JQgz2AhHaQg


Edited by Angury, 27 July 2014 - 06:47 PM.


#27 Psalmist

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 03:07 PM

I love the psalms.. kjv is the only translation that makes the poetic nature of it come in full color. I do want to memorize all 150 to be honest. I need to put in the work. Well then... I'll be back 😎

#28 J. A. Haag

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 05:07 AM

The only poem I ever memorized was for extra credit in a high school English class. I will always remember because I blanked out on the last half of it in front of everyone and my teacher wouldn't allow me to go back to my seat until I remembered the rest. Eventually he realized that there was no way I was going to continue so he let me sit down. But I still had to stand for close to five minutes in silence. Therefore I hesitate to try memorizing any more.



#29 sky29

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:58 AM


I think I'd like to remember some poems that have stuck with me just for my own pleasure of mind. There are poems that have really resonated with me at certain points in my life, and it'd be nice to have those in the back of my mind...

Feel the same but I can only memorize people and conversations...which is not that bad. For anything else, there is always internet to remind you.



#30 Sakura

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 06:43 PM

Hm, I learned a few poems as a teenager, but I'm not doing that anymore. I need my mental capacities for other stuff. :P

 

But I still can do most of the Raven, Hymn of Baal the Great, Love Lost and some Taylor Mali.






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