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TheNinthWord

English/British Fantasy Authors

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Hi all.

 

Does anybody have any recommendations for favourite English/British authors of fantasy novels?

 

I ask because a module for my degree at the moment is studying fantasy fiction, and I'd like to get some wider reading done. Sadly, a couple of my favourite fantasy authors are American, and as an English Literature student, my studies have to focus mostly around English authors. I can refer to American authors a little, but the main focus is English/British.

 

I know of a fair few; Pratchett, Tolkien, Rowling, Moorcock, Gaiman, etc., but I was wondering if there are many more out there that anybody would recommend, particularly if said author plays around with the genre/alludes to other fantasy literature.

 

I'd be very grateful for any help.

 

TNW

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You might try Robert Holdstock and his Ryhope Wood Series.

 

It includes:

 

Mythago Wood

Lavondyss

The Hollowing

Merlin's Wood

The Bone Forest

Gate of Ivory, Gate of Horn

Avilion

 

There is also Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast Trilogy and T.H. White's The Once and Future King.

 

Also, Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrless

 

If I think of more I will let you know.

Edited by Pixie

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For Classic you have contemporary and friend of Tolkien, C S Lewis

 

Also China Mieville he certainly has played around with the genre I will try to think of some others as well, in fact there are similarities between Gaimans Neverwhere and one of China Mieville YA books called UnLundun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by pickle

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Wow, thanks for the responses!

 

@Chrissy: I saw the recent thread for The Last Dragonslayer, and I'm intrigued by Fforde. I'll take a look at some of his Thursday Next series.

 

@Pixie: We're actually studying Merlin's Wood, The Once and Future King and Lud-in-the-Mist. I'm part way through Lud and I "lud" it :D . Merlin's Wood was also a fantastic read. It had me completely hooked. I'll have a look at the Gormenghast Trilogy, though; I've seen it on the shelves before but didn't think to buy it. Will definitely consider it.

 

@pickle: How could I forget Lewis! And I call myself a literature student... Mieville sounds interesting. I read Neverwhere a little while ago, and really enjoyed it, so UnLundun sounds ideal. We're studying a bit of Gaiman; a couple of pieces from Smoke and Mirrors.

 

Thank you all very much for your help! I'll definitely look at getting hold of copies of your suggestions, and hopefully using them in my studies.

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Have you tried David Gemmell?

 

No, actually. Again, I've seen his name on a lot of books in bookshops, but I've never got around to buying and reading them. Perhaps I should give him a go. Thanks :)

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I suppose Sci-Fi is not classed as Fantasy in this instance?

If it is then you can count Peter F. Hamilton.

 

Robert Rankin is also a fantastic Fantasy writer.

 

Joe Abercrombie is another that springs to mind.

Edited by Amesy

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I remembered a few more when I looked at my bookshelves last night

 

Philip Pullman

Diana Wynne Jones

Clive Barker

Simon R Green

 

all very different styles

 

happy reading (oh and studying :D )

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@Amesy: I don't think Sci-Fi counts in the module. We've been looking at Old English/Medieval texts like Beowulf, Chaucer, the Arthurian stuff, and seeing how more recent authors adapt them. Rankin and Abercrombie are both I've heard of before, but never gotten around to reading.

 

@pickle: Ah, yes, I forgot about Pullman as well. I really enjoyed His Dark Materials. I've read a little bit of Barker, but not much, and it seemed more horror-based than fantasy. Is there a particular book of his you'd recommend?

 

@Chrissy: As much as I would love to use Adams, I don't think I can use Sci-Fi novels as part of the module :( . Thanks anyway!

 

Thanks for your suggestions, everybody! It looks like I've got a lot of reading ahead of me.

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I only managed one of Barker's books years and years ago (probably about 20 :D ) Weaveworld but I know someone on here recently read Cabal. I would say these were more horror based fantasy to my recollection but really not sure. I can't remember who just read it will have a look around the forum when I get a mo and see if I can track it down as they also did a review of it.

 

 

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British writers like James Barclay and Alan Campbell spring to mind.

 

What about Canadians? Steven Erikson lives in England ... :lol:

Edited by Karsa Orlong

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@pickle: I'll certainly check it out. It could be interesting to see how he weaves horror conventions with fantasy conventions. Thank you!

 

@Karsa Orlong: I'm afraid Canadians don't count either. Whilst I could make small references to them, I really have to focus my main ideas on English/British/Irish authors. I'll definitely have a look at Alan Campbell and James Barclay though. A quick wikipedia search tells me they could be ideal. Thanks!

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I thought of two more for you. :)

 

Richard Adams

 

Watership Down, Shardik, or Maia would all fall under fantasy.

 

Lord Dunsany

 

The King of Elfland's Daughter and The Charwoman's Shadow

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As pickle has already recommended/ I'll second, China Mieville, he definitely plays around with the genre and a Clive Barker book which is more fantasy than horror is his Abarat books, YA aimed, two of which have been written so far. :) (I just read Cabal and it is horror)

 

Edit: You might want to check out Hal Duncan also.

 

Another you may want to check out is Mary Gentle

Edited by chrysalis_stage

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@Pixie: Ah yes, talking animals is definitely fantasy. Which reminds me about Brian Jacques and his Redwall series. I've read a couple of his already, and from what I remember it seems ideal. Thanks for reminding me (in a roundabout way)! We're studying The King of Elfland's Daughter on the module, but thanks anyway =).

 

@chrysalis_stage: Since two of you have suggested China Mieville, I'll make sure I give him a go. I'll check out the Abarat books as well. I haven't heard of Hal Duncan or Mary Gentle, but I'm sure a quick google will tell me more =). Thank you.

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also check out Amanda Heminway and her pseudonym Jan Siegel. she is an English fantasy writer. I have both her trilogies (one under each name) and they are great.

lyn

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@Pixie: Ah yes, talking animals is definitely fantasy. Which reminds me about Brian Jacques and his Redwall series. I've read a couple of his already, and from what I remember it seems ideal. Thanks for reminding me (in a roundabout way)! We're studying The King of Elfland's Daughter on the module, but thanks anyway =).@chrysalis_stage: Since two of you have suggested China Mieville, I'll make sure I give him a go. I'll check out the Abarat books as well. I haven't heard of Hal Duncan or Mary Gentle, but I'm sure a quick google will tell me more =). Thank you.

I love the Redwall series :)

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I thought of two more for you. :smile:

 

Richard Adams

 

Watership Down, Shardik, or Maia would all fall under fantasy.

 

Lord Dunsany

 

The King of Elfland's Daughter and The Charwoman's Shadow

Also Richard Adams The Girl On The Swing [chiller!] :hide:

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I adore Diana Wynne Jones. Though most her works are focused more towards younger readers I love the sense of wonder her books hold. One of my favourite books of all time is her novel Howl's Moving Castle.

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I find that I am more drawn to British authors than American authors. I guess its because there is something about the history, the quirkiness and the variety of villages and hamlets that so much mischief can happen. I can hear the accents in my head.

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