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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

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I read the book for the first time last year (so when I was 27) and I really liked it. I hope you'll still like it upon re-read!

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I read The Curious Incident of the Dog and the Night-Time as a 13 year as part of me English Lit syllabus. The book left quite an impression on me at the time. Lately I have been pondering on rereading some of the books that I read during my years of English Lit. in high school to see if my opinion/perspective on the books in question has changed.

 

 

It's made it's way to an English lit syllabus? Yay! :D I think it's proper deserving of it :) I like it that teachers add modern books to the reading lists and don't always go with the old classics (not that the classics aren't good, I just like it when things are mixed up every now and then). 

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It's made it's way to an English lit syllabus? Yay! :D I think it's proper deserving of it :) I like it that teachers add modern books to the reading lists and don't always go with the old classics (not that the classics aren't good, I just like it when things are mixed up every now and then). 

 

Indeed! There are a few more recent books that are making their way into English lit. syllabus. Gattaca was one such novel I studied. I found it interesting and rather pertinent in today's obsessive climate.

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In the UK, the education secretary Michael Gove has dropped some American classics such as Of Mice and Men from the English literature syllabus and stated there should be greater emphasis on British authors. That seemed to annoy quite a few people.

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In the UK, the education secretary Michael Gove has dropped some American classics such as Of Mice and Men from the English literature syllabus and stated there should be greater emphasis on British authors. That seemed to annoy quite a few people.

 

I do think the syllabus for English Lit. could do with a shake up in many countries. Not to favour the nationality of the home country as i think diversity is the key to a literary education, but to make the syllabus more relevant in today's society. A more studied balance of the old and new coupled with a foreign element.

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In the UK, the education secretary Michael Gove has dropped some American classics such as Of Mice and Men from the English literature syllabus and stated there should be greater emphasis on British authors. That seemed to annoy quite a few people.

How many of the books you read are by British authors and how many by American authors? We read from both in my English class, though of course in Dutch class we read books from the Netherlands, Belgium and from several of the (former) colonies.

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Gattaca was one such novel I studied. I found it interesting and rather pertinent in today's obsessive climate.

 

Gattaca is a novel? :thud:  I can't find any sign of it in Amazon UK. :o

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How many of the books you read are by British authors and how many by American authors? We read from both in my English class, though of course in Dutch class we read books from the Netherlands, Belgium and from several of the (former) colonies.

I only did English Literature to GCSE level (two years of study). In that time we read Macbeth by Shakespeare, Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas and Romeo and Juliet. We also looked at some poems by Sylvia Plath and Seamus Heaney.

 

I couldn't stand any of those pieces of work when we studied them though; we analysed them to such a degree that it felt like a chore to me to read them. I've reread those works now though, and definitely enjoy them a lot more as I can read them at a leisurely pace without dissecting every sentence.

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I couldn't stand any of those pieces of work when we studied them though; we analysed them to such a degree that it felt like a chore to me to read them. I've reread those works now though, and definitely enjoy them a lot more as I can read them at a leisurely pace without dissecting every sentence.

This makes a lot of sense to me. I also always found books much more enjoyable if I choose to read them rather than having to read them and dissect them.

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We had to analyse this book in school in Year 9 and since I've often returned to it and re-read. It's well written and gives an insight to what it may be like to have aspergers syndrome and creates an awareness for it. The book is fantastic to read and everytime I find it hard to put down. 

 

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