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Athena

Athena's Reading List 2017

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I re-read Angie Sage - Septimus Heap 1: Magyk. I recently bought all of the books in this series. I read the first book many years ago, when I borrowed my sister's Dutch copy. I liked it a lot then and I liked it a lot now. I didn't remember a lot about this book before I started reading it - only a couple of images in my mind. More came back though as I read the book. I did remember one of the twists near the end as we approached it though it could have been somewhat obvious. According to Amazon this book is suited for children between 9 and 11, but I felt the book could easily be enjoyed by a young-adult or adult. If I had not known it was a children's book, I don't think I would have guessed. The book was well written and I really enjoyed reading it. I look forward to the rest in the series.

 

-- as an aside.

The plan is to read one of the books per month, because I don't want to forget what was happened and I don't want to get author or series burnout. However I'm juggling several series this year and I feel kind of pressured about reading them that month and such, while also just wanting to read what I feel in the mood for. I don't like to feel too pressured, so I might just read the next book when I feel in the mood for it next. I'm also reading The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare (next up: City of Glass, but I haven't felt in the mood to read it yet even though I was 'supposed' to have read it already), the Keeper of the Light / Kiss River series by Diane Chamberlain (next up: Her Mother's Shadow, also haven't felt in the mood for it) and the Chronicles of Ixia series by Maria V. Snyder (next up: Magic Study, a re-read, I haven't been in the mood for it). And now the Septimus Heap series. Sometimes it's hard reading too many series (and I'm thinking of starting more).

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I know how you feel about City of Glass. I always quite enjoy the books when I do read them, but it tends to take me ages until I pick another one up again...

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I know how you feel about City of Glass. I always quite enjoy the books when I do read them, but it tends to take me ages until I pick another one up again...

I'm glad I'm not the only one! I'm not sure why it is, but that's just how I feel about it. Hopefully I'll feel in the mood for it within the next month or such.

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I read Benjamin Alire Sáenz - Last Night I Sang to the Monster. This book was recommended by someone who used to be an alcoholic. The book is about an 18-year-old boy who is an alcoholic (and has also done drugs). He's in rehab and we follow his journey to get better (his name is Zach). I liked this book, it was nicely written and I liked the characters. This book is more about the characters than plot. Zach goes through a journey. In the beginning he doesn't remember much from his life before he ended up in rehab, gradually you get to know things. I couldn't always understand the main character, sometimes the text was too abstract. I'm not an alcoholic so I don't quite know what that feels like, it's like I could understand some things on a basic level but not fully imagine what it feels like. I did understand the main character's anxiety well, as that's something I have to deal with as well. I did quite enjoy reading this book. One thing I thought was odd, was that at rehab obviously alcohol and drugs aren't allowed yet people were allowed to smoke in the smoking pit. That strikes me as sort of odd because nicotine is also an addictive substance, and smoking isn't healthy (just like drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and doing drugs isn't healthy). The book contains some well written text that could be used as quotes. I quite liked the way the book ended, I wasn't expecting it.

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I read Marion Pauw - Grijs Gebied. This is a novella, the story is told in 95 pages. It's what we call in the Netherlands 'a literary thriller'. I liked reading this novella but there were a couple more things I had wanted from the story. The story is suspenseful. I would've liked to know more about what happened to the victim after the book ended. I found a few bits a bit cringe-worthy to read (in terms of blood / gore / violence, that sort of thing) but I'm squeamish like that. I had wanted the book to have more plot twists than it did. I did think certain things were well described, the thoughts of the characters for example, I liked the writing style. Overall then I found it enjoyable to read the book but I had a couple of issues with it. I would however like to read a full length novel by the author some time, as I tend to get on better with novels than with short stories and novellas (in general). I own two novels by the author, so I'll read those some time. I picked this novella because I wanted to read something short, that I could finish in one day.

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It's so hard keeping up with series isn't it, I keep saying no more series, then another one comes along and I give in!  It's been over a year since I read City of Glass so I can't remember much about it now, but hope to read the next one sometime this year.

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It is hard! I hope you'll enjoy reading City of Fallen Angels (I think that's the next one after City of Glass).

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I read Karin Slaughter - Ongezien (The Unremarkable Heart), which is a short story of 57 pages (at least, in Dutch). On the cover of the book it says it's a literary thriller but I'm not quite sure I'd agree with that. I didn't like this book so much. I didn't know much about what it was about - the back of the book only has one line on it. Maybe if I had known more what to expect, I would've liked the story more. As it was, I didn't find the story very 'thrilling' or suspenseful. Halfway through I was tempted to give up on it, but because it was so short I thought I'd persist. The second half of the book I liked more and there were more twists. I haven't read any full-length novels by Karin Slaughter, only a novella called Onbegrepen (Martin Misunderstood), which I liked at the time (I struggle to remember what it was about though, but that's not unusual for me). I didn't like Ongezien (The Unremarkable Heart) much, though the twists in the second half of the story slightly redeemed the book in my eyes.

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During my holiday, I read a couple of books on my Kindle.

 

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 3: Just One Kiss

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 4: The Sweetest Kiss

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 5: A Christmas Kiss

 

I had been saving up these e-book novellas for a trip. Because they are e-book only, I figured it'd be nice to save them for a trip. I enjoyed reading these three novellas. I'm doubtful of Amazon's page counts, as it states that book 3 for example is about twice the size of book 5, and book 5 didn't seem of half the length of book 3 to be honest. Anyway, I like most of Susan Hatler's work (what I've read so far), and I quite enjoyed reading these. They're romantic stories, usually some parts of them are predictable but I do enjoy reading them. I was pleased to have enjoyed these books. I didn't enjoy Susan Hatler's Treasured Dreams series much, abandoning it, but I really liked the Better Date Than Never books and so far have enjoyed the Kissed by the Bay series. The first book in a new series should come out soon, I have pre-ordered it.

 

Then I read Shawn Inmon - Life is Short: The Collected Works of Shawn Inmon. This is a short story omnibus, collecting 13 short stories of the author. Some have appeared in other collections before or seperately on Amazon, but others were newly written for this collection. The author publishes e-book only pieces, and I had saved this collection for my holiday. I've liked a lot of the author's works (what I've read so far), and I enjoyed most of the stories in this collection. Genrewise most stories are contemporary fiction but one takes place in the future and a couple of others have thriller aspects. One story has some Christmassy aspects. My favourite of his short stories is Chad Stinson Goes for a Walk. I had read it before, having bought it on its own, but I really enjoyed re-reading it and it remains my favourite of this collection. Overall I enjoyed reading this collection, some stories I enjoyed more than others, but they all were at least somewhat enjoyable. Oh, after each story there is a short piece written by the author explaining where he got the idea for the story or things like that. I thought those pieces were quite interesting to read.

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March 2017 Summary

 

Books read: 28

Pages read: 4544

 

Most impressive / Favourite(s) of the month:

Allie Brosh - Hyperbole and a Half

Vanessa Greene - The Beachside Guest House

Angie Sage - Septimus Heap 1: Magyk (re-read)

 

Slightly less my favourites but still really good, this month:

Raina Telgemeier (colouring: Stephanie Yue) - Smile 1: Smile (Smile)

Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 7: Weerwolfgeheimen

Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 11: SuperDolfje

Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 12: Weerwolf(n)achtbaan

Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 17: MaanMysterie

Benjamin Alire Sáenz - Last Night I Sang to the Monster

Tim Collins (ill. Andrew Pinder) - Dagboek van een Vampier Watje 1: Dagboek van een Vampier Watje (Diary of a Wimpy Vampire 1: Diary of a Wimpy Vampire)

Nick Spalding - Life... 1: Life With No Breaks

Nick Spalding - Life... 2: Life On A High

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 3: Just One Kiss

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 4: The Sweetest Kiss

Susan Hatler - Kissed by the Bay 5: A Christmas Kiss

Shawn Inmon - Life is Short

Kazu Kibuishi - Amulet 1: De Hoeder van de Steen (The Stonekeeper)

 

Pretty enjoyable:

Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look and Saskia Halfmouw) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 14: Een Miniheks In Het Weerwolvenbos

Jodi Picoult - Harvesting the Heart

Geronimo Stilton - Knaag Gezond, Geronimo! (Non Abbuffarti, Geronimo Stilton!)

Lemony Snicket (ill. Jon Klassen) - The Dark

Julia Donaldson and Sara Ogilvie - The Detective Dog

 

Enjoyable but I had some issues:

Marion Pauw - Grijs Gebied

 

Biggest disappointment(s) / Least favourite(s) of the month:

Karin Slaughter - Ongezien (The Unremarkable Heart)

 

Abandoned book:

None!

 

Shortest books read this month:

Jeanne Willis (ill. Jane Chapman) - Monkey Found A Baby (27 pages)

David Melling - The Star-Faced Crocodile (29 pages)

 

Longest books read this month:

Jodi Picoult - Harvesting the Heart (473 pages)

Angie Sage - Septimus Heap 1: Magyk (re-read) (424 pages)

 

Other Notes:

I read a similar amount of pages in March as I did in January or February, but I read a lot more books (which means I read a lot more shorter books). That's in part due to borrowing children's books from the library, and I read some novellas and such.

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I re-read Peter F. Hamilton - The Night's Dawn 1: The Reality Dysfunction. I wanted to take a small or medium sized paperback with me on my trip, that had many pages and not so much weight. I usually bring an epically long book. I've been meaning to re-read this series as it's one of my favourite science-fiction series (and it would in fact get into my top 10 favourite books / series). This book (book 1 in the trilogy) is the book that got me into science-fiction and epic space opera. It has a special place in my heart therefore.

 

I will say these books are not for everyone. They are full of detail on science and technology and other things and contain some descriptions, if that's not your thing then don't read this book.

 

The book is epic, and contains a lot of characters, places, and stuff you've got to remember. I got confused a couple of times, I admit. Reading back my review of my first read of this book (which I wrote when I signed up to GoodReads, some years after I'd actually read the book), I make no mention of this. My tiredness probably isn't helping, and I've been feeling more forgetful than I used to be. But anyway, I was still able to follow the story and I did remember some things that happened so. Mostly things came back to me as I read them, though sometimes I knew how a situation was going to end.

 

This is book one in a trilogy, the story isn't finished. I remember liking books 2 and 3 just as much as the first one (though like I said, the first one was the first book I read of epic space opera, so it has a special place in my heart).

 

Like I said, these books are not for everyone. I really enjoyed re-reading this book though. I will say I was also glad to finish it, to now be able to move onto something else (something shorter, easier-to-read and less epic). It'll probably be a bit of time before I'll re-read book 2, I need a break now from this type of book :P. But hopefully not too long or I might forget too much. I'm reading several series this year so I should try to not wait too long with all of them, but it's hard. A reading mood strikes when it strikes.

 

Here's my original review, and also one of the first reviews I've ever written:

 

I bought this book because I'd heard it's good. It didn't disappoint! It's a great story with lots of tension about what's going to happen. One of the things I really liked is how the author explains some of the science behind the science-fiction stuff / technology (such as the ships). What I liked less were the scenes with sex in them, but that's probably just me. It's not that descriptive or anything, one of the characters has intercourse with several people over the course of the book, and this is not something that I agree with, thus I couldn't feel for this character as much as for some of the other characters in the book. Overall though it's a great book, quite well written. It's an epic science-fiction story (this is part one of the trilogy, the story does not end in part one).

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I read Rainbow Rowell - Eleanor & Park. I tried to read this book a couple of times before, but I never really felt in the mood for it. A few days ago I suddenly found myself in the mood for it and decided to read it. This is a young-adult contemporary fiction story. I quite enjoyed reading this book. It was a cute story, and there was a twist I didn't see coming. I liked the characters in this book. Eleanor & Park are both characters you don't often see and I quite liked that. This book is not a new favourite for me, but I did enjoy it a lot. It's written in short chapters from both Eleanor's and Park's point of view, but it's not written in first person but in third person. The book takes place in the 1980s. It was a pretty quick read. Overall I enjoyed reading the book even if it's not quite a new favourite.

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I read a lot of picture books on Friday:

 

Ingrid Schubert and Dieter Schubert - Woeste Willem (re-read)
Katie Cleminson - Otto de Boekenbeer (Otto the Book Bear)
Tjibbe Veldkamp and Philip Hopman - Een Ober van Niks
Guido van Genechten - Klein Wit Visje: Klein Wit Visje Telt Tot 11
Guido van Genechten - Klein Wit Visje: Klein Wit Visje Wordt Groot
Guusje Nederhorst - Woezel en Pip 1: Woezel en Pip
Korky Paul and Valerie Thomas - Hennie De Heks 5: Hennie De Heks En De Computer (Winnie The Witch 5: Winnie's New Computer)
Martin Waddell and Barbara Firth - Kleine Beer 1: Weltrusten... Kleine Beer (Little Bear 1: Can't You Sleep, Little Bear?)
Martin Waddell and Barbara Firth - Kleine Beer 3: Jij en Ik, Kleine Beer (Little Bear 1: You and Me, Little Bear) (re-read)
Martin Waddell and Barbara Firth - Kleine Beer 4: Goed Zo, Kleine Beer (Little Bear 1: Well Done, Little Bear)
Max Velthuijs - Kikker: Kikker in de Kou
Max Velthuijs - Kikker: Kikker is Bang
Max Velthuijs - Kikker: Het ABC van Kikker
Max Velthuijs - De Gevaarlijke Reis
Max Velthuijs - Kikker: Kikker in de Wind: Het Schetsboek van Max Velthuijs
Max Velthuijs (& Others) - Kikker: Kikker en het Slaapfeest
Jean-Luc Fromental and Joëlle Joliet - 365 Pinguïns (365 Pingouins)

 

All of the picture books were at least somewhat enjoyable and most were quite enjoyable. I even smiled and laughed out loud a couple of times. Two of the books were re-reads, my mum used to read those to me when I was a child. Aside from the two I've read before, from the other ones, the one I liked the most was 365 Pinguïns. Of course all picture books are written for very young children, but I found that some were more enjoyable for me as an adult than others. For example Het ABC van Kikker didn't really contain a story, though I did like seeing the illustrations. And the two Klein Wit Visje books are definitely written for smaller children in mind than some of the others. But I enjoyed reading all of the picture books.

 

On Saturday I read David Walliams (ill. Tony Ross) - Blob, a novella in honour of World Book Day. This was a nice story about a boy and animals at the zoo. I liked it. The illustrations were nice. The book is also a bit educational, it talks about the various animals that live at the zoo and there is a sort of glossary at the back with a little bit more information, for children. The story was entertaining. Not one of Walliam's best works, as I prefer most of his full length novels (those I've read, that is), but it was enjoyable.


On Sunday I read James Patterson and K. A. John - Bloody Valentine (QuickReads). First off, only Patterson's name is on the cover. In the inside of the book are both the authors' names. It makes me wonder if they were trying to sell the book based on Patterson's name, and how the book writing process worked, who did what. Anyway, this book was a nice mystery. I was a bit confused at first, as to how we went from one location to another seemingly instantly somewhere in the beginning of the book but aside from that the mystery was suspenseful. I enjoyed reading it though I do like it less looking back upon it now. It was an enjoyable novella. I don't think I'll remember much of the book in a year's time probably, but not all books have to be very memorable, sometimes it's nice to just enjoy something during the moments of reading.

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I read Catherine Ryan Hyde - Second Hand Heart. This is the story of Vida and Richard. Vida is a nineteen-year-old girl who's been sick all her life. Now she needs a heart transplant to survive. Richard's wife dies in traffic, and Vida gets her heart. Richard is grieving for his dead wife. Vida and Richard meet. The book is about cellular memory. I don't want to say too much because of spoilers. The book is written in first person view, with sections from Vida's POV and sections from Richard's POV. They're both keeping a diary in which they write. It was a bit of an emotional book, but I didn't get as emotional as I did with some of CRH's other novels. This was not one of her best novels, but I did enjoy reading it even if it wasn't the best book ever written. I enjoyed reading about Vida and Richard and the other characters. Just don't go in expecting it to be as good as Don't Let Me Go, because I doubt anything she writes will be as good as that one (the first one I read, it will always have a special place in my heart). But it was an enjoyable book. I don't know if it'll stick with me, but I did like it more than Chasing Windmills which is my least favourite of CRH's full length novels for adults (out of the ones I've read).

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On 4/10/2017 at 11:34 AM, Athena said:

On Saturday I read David Walliams (ill. Tony Ross) - Blob, a novella in honour of World Book Day. This was a nice story about a boy and animals at the zoo. I liked it. The illustrations were nice. The book is also a bit educational, it talks about the various animals that live at the zoo and there is a sort of glossary at the back with a little bit more information, for children. The story was entertaining. Not one of Walliam's best works, as I prefer most of his full length novels (those I've read, that is), but it was enjoyable.

 

I read this to James (my 4 year old) over several nights a few weeks ago, as it was his free World Day book. He rather liked it - especially the zoo map and the pictures of all the animals.I found it quite amusing too.

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9 hours ago, More reading time required said:

 

I read this to James (my 4 year old) over several nights a few weeks ago, as it was his free World Day book. He rather liked it - especially the zoo map and the pictures of all the animals.I found it quite amusing too.

 

How nice to hear you and your son liked Blob too :smile:. The zoo map and pictures of the animals were quite nice I agree, I do like Tony Ross' illustrations.

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I read Angie Sage - Septimus Heap 2: Flyte. I had a bit of trouble to get into the book. When I started to read it, reading wasn't really what I wanted to do but I couldn't do the things I wanted to do at the time. I was also not sure what kind of reading mood I was in, what kind of book I felt like reading. So I read between 50 and 60 pages that first day. Then I spent a couple of days being busy (doing stuff for the forum among other things), so I didn't read in the book at all and was still unsure if I wanted to continue reading it. Yesterday I finally sat down and read for a while in Flyte, and I found myself liking it much more. I finished it today. While I wasn't keen on the beginning, and I didn't like for example (spoiler for stuff in Flyte that happens in the first 60ish pages):

 

Spoiler

how almost no one believed Septimus when he said Simon had kidnapped Jenna.

 

However, after the beginning I started to enjoy the story more, perhaps also because I was more able to relax. I quite enjoyed reading a lot of it yesterday and finishing the book today. I like the little snippets that are after the story is over, about the various side characters and their past or futures. That's quite nice. Anyway, I enjoyed reading this second book in the Septimus Heap series.

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I read Cynthia Kim - Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate: A User Guide to an Asperger Life. This is a book written by a woman with Asperger's Syndrome. The book is non-fiction, it's sort of a memoir that tells about how her autism affects Cynthia's life. It talks about lots of different aspects. It had short (sub)chapters which I liked and I enjoyed the lists in the book. The book also gave some tips for certain aspects (ie. how to be married to someone with autism). I recognised myself in a lot of the things the author mentioned, though there were also quite a few differences between us (but I could understand why it worked that way for the author, even if it doesn't work for me that way). Towards the end of the book it gets a bit psychological and I'm not sure that I 100% understood everything, or rather, it made sense at the time but ask me now to repeat what the pages said and I'd look at you rather blankly. I also enjoyed for example, the section on autism and parenting, which is something I haven't often read about in books (usually it's about a child with autism or a father with autism, not a mother with autism). I definitely don't want children but it was interesting to read how Cynthia experienced being a parent.

 

I quite liked reading this book. I picked it up because someone recommended it to me, a new blogger whose blog I've been reading for a little while now (link to Paperfury). And I'm happy I followed her recommendation, because I quite liked reading this book. It's nice to read a book or about someone every once in a while, that you can really identify with (whether it's fiction or non-fiction).

 

I also decided to read this book now, not only because I've just bought it and wanted to read it, but also because I was fed up that the pharmacy didn't do what they promised a couple of days ago, so I decided to read a book about someone who also doesn't like it when someone doesn't do what they say they will and doesn't like unexpected situations and such (phew, that sentence was probably way too long). It made me feel comforted.

 

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1 hour ago, Little Pixie said:

Boo @ the pharmacy ! I`m glad the book helped you. :empathy:

 

Thanks Sarah :hug:.

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I read Becky Albertalli - The Upside of Unrequited. I loved Becky Albertalli's debut novel, Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda. The Upside of Unrequited is her second novel. While I didn't like TUoU as much as SvstHPA, I still enjoyed it a lot. I loved the diversity in the book. For example, the main character has two mums, her twin sister is a lesbian and a side character is pansexual (I wasn't sure what that meant, so I looked it up. The book doesn't explain it). There are characters of various descents in the book (I don't know if I'm phrasing that correctly), for example there is a Korean-American character.

 

The book's main character is Molly. She often has crushes on boys but never takes any steps to ask the boy in question whether he likes or or not, nor does she tell him he likes her. Molly is insecure. She is overweight and is worried people won't like her as a girlfriend. She suffers from anxiety. She has a close friendship with her twin sister and with a couple of other people. Her twin sister gets a girlfriend and Molly feels left out. The book isn't only about love (as in romantic love) but also the bond between the twin sisters and about their family and such.

 

Anyway, I really liked most things about this book. I already mentioned the diversity. I liked the messages the book gave. The book was a quick read. I liked seeing a cameo appearance of Simon (from Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda). Abby, also from Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda, played a bigger role in the book, she is Molly's cousin. It was nice seeing these two characters again.

 

The one thing I liked less about the book, was the fact that Molly had had so many crushes, simply because I don't understand it. I've never had a crush on someone I hardly know. For movie / TV stars / characters I have liked some when I was a child, but that was always after having seen them in something for a while and heard them speak and see what they were like. I don't understand people who get a crush on someone they don't know. But that's probably just me. With both my ex and my boyfriend I became friends with them first, before I fell in love. I need to know someone better first before I can 'like' them in a more-than-friends way.

 

I would also have liked to have seen more of certain side characters. I quite liked all of the characters and I hope we'll see some of them again in further novels Becky Albertalli may write (I have no idea if she's writing another book, I hope so!).

 

Overall then I quite liked this book. I really liked most things about it and there were a few minor things I liked less about the book. The Upside of Unrequited wasn't as good as Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda for me, but I still liked it a lot :).

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I read Herman Koch - Makkelijk Leven. This is the 'Boekenweekgeschenk' 2017, or 'book week gift 2017', if you spend over a certain amount of money on Dutch books during a certain 10 days in 2017, you get the especially written novella for free. This year Herman Koch wrote the novella.

 

The novella is about a self-help book writer named Tom. He is married to his wife and has two sons. One of the sons is his favourite, the other he finds 'boring'. He doesn't like his favourite son's wife. One day during a birthday party for his wife, his favourite son's wife is at the door. She claims the favourite son (her husband) hit her.

 

I found this book an enjoyable read while I read it, but I don't think it's one that will stick with me, nor was it a great book (novella). I had a couple of issues with some of the things in the novella, but I can't tell you for fear of spoilers. I didn't totally understand the motivations of the main character at times.

 

I did like the writing style, the page with self-help tips at the end and the way these were woven into the story. I liked the way the main character played out conversations in his head. Some other reviews I've read didn't actually like this aspect, but this is something I do myself too sometimes (to prepare for a conversation or event), so I recognised this (the main character didn't do it for that reason though).

 

I felt a certain thing in the story wasn't handled with the respect I thought it should have been. The end was a bit sudden and I didn't quite understand the motivations of some of the characters near the end.

 

I might have had some issues with the book, but I did enjoy the read overall even if it wasn't a great read.

 

I quite liked Het Diner by Herman Koch (The Dinner), and I've got Zomerhuis met Zwembad on my to-read pile. I read Geachte Heer M. from the library (in huge font) and thought the book was okay but I didn't enjoy it as much as I liked Het Diner. I wasn't that keen on Geachte Heer M. I'm going to give Zomerhuis met Zwembad a try some time at least. He has also written other books but I don't own those. Whether I'll give them a try or not, I don't know at this point. I guess I'll give Zomerhuis met Zwembad a try and if I like it enough I might read more by the author but if it's a disappointment I might not try more by him.

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21 minutes ago, Little Pixie said:

That freebie idea sounds good. :)

 

I agree :)! We have a Bookweek for children's books too, then a special children's book gets written by a Dutch children's author (a different one every time). When I was a child, my mum let me pick a book for Children's Book Week (Kinderboekenweek), and then I'd get the freebie. We also have the same thing but then specifically for thrillers for adults, also with a specially written freebie (in June I believe?). As an adult I don't always participate in these things, but this year I felt like it and it coincided with some Dutch books I wanted to buy.

 

I wanted to tell you, William, my goat, is gone :(. He passed away about 45 mins ago (I think). According to the vet he has had a brain hemorrhage. I wanted to let you know, since we've talked about him on the forum. I'm sad :wibbly:.

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