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Kasei

Kasei's Read-a-blog!

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Sooooo. Long time no see everyone!

 

I haven't been particularly active here since '07 due to life, work, education pursuits, etc...however! Now that my life has settled into a semblance of normalcy I feel prepared to pick up where I left off and rejoin my favorite old online community! Seriously, you guys rock and are so into talking about reading, its fantastic. <3

 

Figured I'd start things off light with a couple of lists and go from there--no goals yet, but maybe over the summer when I have a bit more time. If anyone out there has any suggestions, sling 'em my way!

 

Oh, and you will likely see a lot of kid's books/YA novels just because I teach at an elementary school and my classroom is connected to the library...so I tend to wander in there and browse. :)

 

 

Currently Reading:

*The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

And Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

 

 

Sitting on the shelf in Que to be Read:

 

The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

Beowulf

Aesop's Fables by Aesop

 

Would Like to Read but do not currently have in possession:

Name of the Wind by Pat Rothfuss

London by Edward Rutherfurd

She Who Remembers by Linda Lay Shuler

Cretaceous sea: A novel of time travel by Will Hubbel

Ice Hunt by James Rollins

Raptor by Paul Zindel

Tyrannosaur Canyon by Douglas J. Preston

West of Eden by Harry Harrison

The Land that Time Forgot by Edgar Rice Burroughs

The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

Have Read since January 2011:

Fatalis by Jeff Rovin

Dinosaur Summer by Greg Bear

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

*The Wal-Mart Effect by Charles Fishman[review]

Still Life with Rice by Helie Lee [review]

Titus Alone by Mervyn Peake [review]

*Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake [review]

Titus Groan by Mervyn Peake [review]

Hope for Animals and Their World by Jane Goodall

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins[review]

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins[review]

No One Loved Gorillas More: Dian Fossey Letters from the Mist by Camilla De La Bedoyere [review]

Elephant Memories by Cynthia J. Moss [review]

*The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (review)

*Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (review)

A Series of Unfortunate Events: Book the First by Lemony Snickett

Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen

*Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey

**An Ordinary Man by Paul Rusesabagina

 

---

 

Key:

* = recommend

X = I didn't care for the book

All unmarked books mean that I enjoyed the read

 

My reviews can be interpreted as such:

0: Paperweight

1: Could've done without reading this one, hardly any redeeming qualities

2: A "meh" book--unmemorable/had a lot of problems I couldn't read around

3: Pretty okay. You won't die if you miss it, but not awful.

4: Quite enjoyable.

5: You absolutely should read this. It reeks of awesome.(you may assume that any title with ** by it gets this rating from me)

Edited by Kasei

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Sooooo. Long time no see everyone!

 

I haven't been particularly active here since '07 due to life, work, education pursuits, etc...however! Now that my life has settled into a semblance of normalcy I feel prepared to pick up where I left off and rejoin my favorite old online community! Seriously, you guys rock and are so into talking about reading, its fantastic. <3

 

 

 

 

Currently Reading:

 

Elephant Memories by Cynthia J. Moss

Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

 

Sitting on the shelf in Que to be Read:

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson

 

 

Would Like to Read but do not currently have in possession:

ston

Name of the Wind by Pat Rothfuss

[

 

 

 

First of all welcome back! I've only been here for about a year and it's the most warm, kind and funny place on the Internet. :)

 

You must read the way of kings, it's absolutely amazing! The same goes for the name of the wind, I'm dying to read the sequel Wise Mans Fear that will be out in March!

 

How do you like The Hunger Games? I found it to be very addicting.

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Welcome back, Kasei! Some great looking titles there and hope to see you around lots :D.

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Though your departure was before my time - welcome back :) glad you found your way here again, I myself was kept away by a couple months' worth of un-normalcy in late 2010 and man, I missed this place!

 

Do let me know when you start on Titus, I've been meaning to read it for a long time (I loved the BBC Gormenghast, also the series is my Mum's second all-time favourite and she's never been wrong) so maybe knowing someone else is tackling it will give me an incentive :blush:.

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Hiya Kasei! I noticed that you mentioned The Cave of the Bear Clan in another thread on here and I was wondering if you've read Linda Lay Shuler's She Who Remembers? I haven't read TCofBC myself, but I've read SWR and I thought it was brilliant, and it's supposed to be the same kind of stuff as Untinen-Auel's novels. You said in your post that you liked the historical aspect of the novel, and I think you might really enjoy SWR :)

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You must read the way of kings, it's absolutely amazing! The same goes for the name of the wind, I'm dying to read the sequel Wise Mans Fear that will be out in March!

 

How do you like The Hunger Games? I found it to be very addicting.

 

Just started both of these today and I am quite hooked already! I am sad because my job keeps me busy during the week, meaning I'll have to wait until next weekend to see what happens next, gah! Only on the second chapter of both right now, tantalizing!

 

Do let me know when you start on Titus, I've been meaning to read it for a long time (I loved the BBC Gormenghast, also the series is my Mum's second all-time favourite and she's never been wrong) so maybe knowing someone else is tackling it will give me an incentive :blush:.

 

Actually I'd never heard of it until I read Gorillas in the Mist. One of the Gorillas in there was named by a student after the main character of the book she was reading at the time (back in the 70s). This Gorilla turned out to be the same wild gorilla they used for the eventual movie that came from Mrs. Fossey's published studies, so I was drawn in a kind of unconventional way--but to make a long story short, I will definitely post what I think about it when I get to that point. I'm pretty excited! As much as I like the modern writing styles, I love the way books used to be written. For this same reason I am excited about getting my hands on The Lost World....but that's another story (ahahaha, I am so punny).

 

 

Hiya Kasei! I noticed that you mentioned The Cave of the Bear Clan in another thread on here and I was wondering if you've read Linda Lay Shuler's She Who Remembers? I haven't read TCofBC myself, but I've read SWR and I thought it was brilliant, and it's supposed to be the same kind of stuff as Untinen-Auel's novels. You said in your post that you liked the historical aspect of the novel, and I think you might really enjoy SWR :)

 

Sweet! Thank you so much for the suggestion, I'll add it to my list straight-away. I haven't heard of SWR before, but it sounds like fun. :)

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Hunger Games

Rating: 4.5

Spoiler: Nope

 

Just finished this one last night and I gotta say, it was quite fun! My only gripe is that character continuity sometimes came into question, in particular with the "coach" of the two kids. One minute he was a bumbling drunk that had no thought to spare for anyone else and then all of a sudden he's an immediately serious and super in-tune-to-your-needs mentor? Without any character development or anything? I mean, literally, the transformation happened in the same scene.

 

Other than that and a few nit-picky, easy-way-out plot twists that I wont mention for fear of spoilage, it really wasn't a bad book at all. I inhaled it. It is the story that matters anyway, and that was certainly entertaining enough to keep me unable to fall asleep until I knew what happened next (made me quite tired for work today too). While I don't know how much I buy into the world the authoress has set up and how likely it is that so many people would sit by and let these kinds of things happen, it was a simple enough matter to let that slide seeing as the story moves at a fast clip.

 

The marvelous thing about young adult books is that they are easy to pick up and get into, especially if there is an interesting story. No deep literature here of course, so I suppose you have to be in the mood for something quick and easy; but unless you really tend to dislike books written for youth, it isn't at all dissatisfying.

 

Overall, definitely worth checking out from the library and spending a carefree afternoon with. I will likely pick up the next two soon.

Edited by Kasei

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I'm not sure whether it's in the Hunger Games of the next book but there is a part that explains the mentor's behaviour.

 

 

Bascially for 20 odd years he has taken kids to die to the hunger Games. He has managed to dull the pain by drinking himself to oblivion and not caring. This time he sees that Katniss has a chance of survival and he manages to pull himself together to keep her alive. It made sense to me

 

 

I often find YA books may be an easy read but if they are good ones they have a theme that can resonate for some time. I love the dystopian society presented in the Hunger Games. The next two books get more into depth with the society and really leave you with some thinking to do.

 

Slight bias here as I loved the Hunger Games :giggle2:

Edited by ladymacbeth

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I'm not sure whether it's in the Hunger Games of the next book but there is a part that explains the mentor's behaviour.

 

 

Bascially for 20 odd years he has taken kids to die to the hunger Games. He has managed to dull the pain by drinking himself to oblivion and not caring. This time he sees that Katniss has a chance of survival and he manages to pull himself together to keep her alive. It made sense to me

 

 

Slight bias here as I loved the Hunger Games :giggle2:

 

No, that was the explanation given in this book, you're right. And I understand what she was getting at, but I still thought it was kind of a flimsy and convenient write-off when held up to his instant behavior alteration. For it to change SO suddenly, like flipping a switch...I dunno, to me if you've been behaving a certain way toward people for over half of your life you get into a routine. Especially if you're feeling so helpless; defense mechanisms that are that ingrained and important to your survival should not be so easy to shed.

 

But, like I said, it was only mildly irritating to me and certainly not enough to distract me from the rest of the book, which I found marvelous. :)

 

No worries, I understand defending what you love; Lord knows I've defended worse books and movies to the death because I love them so much. x)

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The Way of Kings

 

Rating: 5

Spoiler: Not really, unless you like to go into a book blind.

 

This is exactly my kind of book.

 

At first the sheer size of the novel was a bit daunting. At just over a thousand pages I've gotta say that I drug my feet a bit getting started--but let me tell you, once it picked up (which did not take long) I began to dread how close I was getting to the end.

 

This world is a richly-built and thoroughly thought out one. The setting is a continent called Roshar whose countries are under constant threat of war. Theirs is a history full of lore and religious instability and as a result most people are unsure of what is true about their nation's past and what isn't. The land is cursed with severe weather known as "highstorms," which are basically severe hurricanes and with these hurricanes comes a lot of myth and mysticism. It is not high-tech space age fantasy, but at the same time it is not entirely Tolkein-esque either. Just an alternate world with people like you and I living without industrial age technology but where "stormlight" (a byproduct of the highstorms) picks up the slack. Most of the book takes place in a war camp and in what is essentially a library, two places that are easy to relate to as the necessities of either don't differ much no matter what your surroundings.

 

I fell in love with the entire main cast of this novel. And the minor cast. And the villains. Just...wonderfully written characters, all of them. Oftentimes fantasy writers fall prey to making their characters too perfect. Too heroic. Too ideal. But all of Sanderson's characters were really well fleshed out and, more importantly, very flawed. He was very good at showing their inner turmoil regarding the sometimes horrible things they were doing. And he delved right into all of the politics and strategical maneuvering that goes on in the upper (and lower) echelons of society.

 

And he did a good job of mixing action with intrigue, theology, philosophy, and just all around solid discourse that leaves the reader reflecting on one's own life and world. The surprises and twists revealed at the end make the anticipated wait for the next book torturous. Supposedly not going to be out until November 2012...I think I will need to murder the friends who turned me on to this book without warning me that it was a series-in-progress. Gah!

 

All in all, if you have even a passing interest in fantasy, I recommend picking this one up.

Edited by Kasei

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The Way of Kings

 

Rating: 5

Spoiler: Not really, unless you like to go into a book blind.

 

This is exactly my kind of book.

 

At first the sheer size of the novel was a bit daunting. At just over a thousand pages I've gotta say that I drug my feet a bit getting started--but let me tell you, once it picked up (which did not take long) I began to dread how close I was getting to the end.

 

This world is a richly-built and thoroughly thought out one. The setting is a continent called Roshar whose countries are under constant threat of war. Theirs is a history full of lore and religious instability and as a result most people are unsure of what is true about their nation's past and what isn't. The land is cursed with severe weather known as "highstorms," which are basically severe hurricanes and with these hurricanes comes a lot of myth and mysticism. It is not high-tech space age fantasy, but at the same time it is not entirely Tolkein-esque either. Just an alternate world with people like you and I living without industrial age technology but where "stormlight" (a byproduct of the highstorms) picks up the slack. Most of the book takes place in a war camp and in what is essentially a library, two places that are easy to relate to as the necessities of either don't differ much no matter what your surroundings.

 

I fell in love with the entire main cast of this novel. And the minor cast. And the villains. Just...wonderfully written characters, all of them. Oftentimes fantasy writers fall prey to making their characters too perfect. Too heroic. Too ideal. But all of Sanderson's characters were really well fleshed out and, more importantly, very flawed. He was very good at showing their inner turmoil regarding the sometimes horrible things they were doing. And he delved right into all of the politics and strategical maneuvering that goes on in the upper (and lower) echelons of society.

 

And he did a good job of mixing action with intrigue, theology, philosophy, and just all around solid discourse that leaves the reader reflecting on one's own life and world. The surprises and twists revealed at the end make the anticipated wait for the next book torturous. Supposedly not going to be out until November 2012...I think I will need to murder the friends who turned me on to this book without warning me that it was a series-in-progress. Gah!

 

All in all, if you have even a passing interest in fantasy, I recommend picking this one up.

 

Oh you read it! have to agree with everything you say, the books is absolutely amazing. It's been a few weeks since I finished it and I still think about every now and then. I do hope we get to meet the main characters in the ext book!

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The Way of Kings

 

Rating: 5

Spoiler: Not really, unless you like to go into a book blind.

 

This is exactly my kind of book.

 

At first the sheer size of the novel was a bit daunting. At just over a thousand pages I've gotta say that I drug my feet a bit getting started--but let me tell you, once it picked up (which did not take long) I began to dread how close I was getting to the end.

 

This world is a richly-built and thoroughly thought out one. The setting is a continent called Roshar whose countries are under constant threat of war. Theirs is a history full of lore and religious instability and as a result most people are unsure of what is true about their nation's past and what isn't. The land is cursed with severe weather known as "highstorms," which are basically severe hurricanes and with these hurricanes comes a lot of myth and mysticism. It is not high-tech space age fantasy, but at the same time it is not entirely Tolkein-esque either. Just an alternate world with people like you and I living without industrial age technology but where "stormlight" (a byproduct of the highstorms) picks up the slack. Most of the book takes place in a war camp and in what is essentially a library, two places that are easy to relate to as the necessities of either don't differ much no matter what your surroundings.

 

I fell in love with the entire main cast of this novel. And the minor cast. And the villains. Just...wonderfully written characters, all of them. Oftentimes fantasy writers fall prey to making their characters too perfect. Too heroic. Too ideal. But all of Sanderson's characters were really well fleshed out and, more importantly, very flawed. He was very good at showing their inner turmoil regarding the sometimes horrible things they were doing. And he delved right into all of the politics and strategical maneuvering that goes on in the upper (and lower) echelons of society.

 

And he did a good job of mixing action with intrigue, theology, philosophy, and just all around solid discourse that leaves the reader reflecting on one's own life and world. The surprises and twists revealed at the end make the anticipated wait for the next book torturous. Supposedly not going to be out until November 2012...I think I will need to murder the friends who turned me on to this book without warning me that it was a series-in-progress. Gah!

 

All in all, if you have even a passing interest in fantasy, I recommend picking this one up.

I've been trying to stay away from epic fantasies. Trilogies are fine, but when there is book after book I am hesitant to start a series. However, your review of this book has really intrigued me, and I am going to give this one a go when it comes out in paperback.

 

Although, I have read it will be 10 books or more, and that kind of depresses me. Oh, well. Thank you, anyway, for this wonderful review. :)

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Oh you read it! have to agree with everything you say, the books is absolutely amazing. It's been a few weeks since I finished it and I still think about every now and then. I do hope we get to meet the main characters in the ext book!

 

Oh man, it really was a thrill ride--especially the last half. Nearly impossible to put down, I cannot WAIT for the next book and am horrified at the prospect of doing so. :( Also, I think I am going to have to move Name of the Wind up on my list and try and get to it more quickly--I've just spoken with another friend who highly recommends it and he loved The Way of Kings/Wheel of Time...so I think this book will be a good next bet.

 

 

I've been trying to stay away from epic fantasies. Trilogies are fine, but when there is book after book I am hesitant to start a series. However, your review of this book has really intrigued me, and I am going to give this one a go when it comes out in paperback.

 

Although, I have read it will be 10 books or more, and that kind of depresses me. Oh, well. Thank you, anyway, for this wonderful review. :)

Yikes, 10 books? I hadn't heard that...scary! I understand your hesitation though, that's part of why I haven't gotten in to the Wheel of Time series...just too darn long! Some day maybe, but I'll wait til they're completed (I hate waiting for books). Still, the writing in The Way of Kings was good enough that I think it'll be worth the anticipation.

 

I'm glad this review piqued your interest, what a compliment. :D You won't regret reading it, I guarantee it. There were times I found myself yelling at the book I was so into it. :blush:

Edited by Kasei

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I heard it will be 10 books as well! But I haven't really waited for something since Harry Potter so I guess I'll hang in there.

 

You MUST read The name of the wind, Rothfuss is such a brilliant writer. And if you like it you won't have to wait that long cause the next one come out I March and it's going to be 994 pages! After that you'll have to wait though cause he is not a fast writer, the first one took 7 years and the second almost 4 I think. :(

 

I do how you enjoy it!

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Elephant Memories

 

Rating: 5/5

Spoilers: Kind of hard to spoil it

 

If you have ever wanted to know more about elephants (I.e. you're weird like me) then this is the book for you. It is the culmination of 13 years of field study by Cynthia J. Moss, and it is a delight to read. It was great to get to take a peek inside the life and mind of an elephant and really understand their behaviors and society on the same level as someone who has devoted their life to studying them.

 

Although it lacks the drama of Dian Fossey's Gorillas in the Mist, it does provide a wealth of knowledge about all sorts of Elephantine activities and behaviors in all sorts of environments. Like any good conservationist, the authoress does a great job of wrapping the book up at the end with a lot of state-of-the-union facts about where elephants stand and the ivory trade as of the book's publication (circa 1988, although there is an updated 2000 version that I'd love to get my hands on).

 

Overall, it's a great book for the genre and if you're into reading about the natural world, don't pass this one up!

Edited by Kasei

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Haha, soooo confession to make: I was supposed to get started on Titus Groan, but...but then The Dian Fossey book came in and I just watched Gorillas in the Mist so I am quite curious to know whether or not she was that crazy....so here I go, putting Titus on the backburner before I get too far into it and gonna attempt to fly through the Fossey book.

 

Also, I am feeling the need to do some Way of Kings fanart and I think I may just post it here in my book blog thread instead of throwing it in your faces somewhere else on the forums. We shall see....

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No One Loved Gorillas More: Dian Fossey Letters from the Mist

 

Rating: 5/5

Spoilers: nah

 

This was a fantastically interesting read. I loved being able to get inside the mind of the woman behind Karisoke and the Virunga mountain gorillas in Rwanda. After reading her book and watching the movie, this book was the next logical step--and there is more to discover it would seem! I've just found out that a number of her colleagues (including Bob Campbell, her infamous lover) have written books about their version of the events that took place in the Parc des Volcans. I must say I am quite curious and might be tempted to pick up their acounts in the near future.

 

I'm not sure why the life and story of Dian Fossey holds such a fascination for me, but I feel inexplicably drawn into the circumstances that lead to saving the mountain gorilla from extinction. For anyone out there with a passing interest in animals, conservation, or even just a good real-life adventure of someone overcoming innumerable obstacles, this book is a must-read.

Edited by Kasei

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Aaaand...I'm bad again. My friend just lent me the next two Hunger Games books by Suzanne Collins so I think I'm going to have to inhale these as well before I move on to Titus Groan--which I do want to read! I just...am sorely tempted by these two quick-looking YA books. Reviews to come soon, I'm sure.

 

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Hehe, did you just make that yourself? Clever :lol: You have my utmost sympathy :empathy:

 

Heh, yeah I just doodled it up--to me blogs are more interesting when there is a picture or two to break up the wall of words. Plus I like finding excuses to scribble. :) Thanks! I'm sure we've all felt that way when faced with a huge doorstop-type book...I'll get to it soon though! Finishing up Catching Fire now...!

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I think it's a very common experience, no matter how intriguing a book might seem, the massiveness of it can put you off it. I should've known you did it yourself, I just realised you have a link to DeviantArt in your signature :)

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Catching Fire

Rating: 3.5/5

Spoilers: Kind of

 

So, this book—I don’t know. I’m a little torn. Clearly by my rating I didn’t dislike it, but at the same time there were portions of it that really bothered me. I mean, I still think this book and the series are worth reading, but my first impression was that Catching Fire seemed much more hastily written than Hunger Games. I can distinctly remember a number of instances when large lapses in time were passed over in a single paragraph and yet the attitudes and outlooks of the characters did not change, despite the fact that they were concerned about matters that can change on a dime (emotions, social unrest, politics, etc). Aside from the lack of development in this respect, these lapses also made me feel left out of the action—I wanted to know what was going on intimately in their lives, not just to be given a quick run-down of events. Now, in defense of the authoress this might’ve been in interest of keeping the book shorter since it is aimed at young adults…but look at the later Harry Potter books! I see 10 year olds diving into those tomes so I don’t see why middle/high school kids can’t do the same just as easily.

 

Because of this though the plot was fast paced and there wasn’t a whole lot of drag to the book, which was nice. There are seeds of rebellion, slight political intrigue, unexpected allies, surprise twists…actually a lot of really neat things happen in this part of the series, which is what boosts the score of the book for me.

 

However, what keeps it down is not the plot. It is the fact that this book made me dislike the main character. It’s not a good thing when the voice of your story becomes someone you don’t like listening too. Katniss comes off as extremely moody and self-centered; admittedly, very stereotypical teenager traits. But in the first book we are introduced to a character who does not think and behave like a typical teenager: The Katniss of Hunger Games was tough, hardened, and practical. This Katniss is a weepy mess that can’t get her priorities straight and wastes time stringing two guys along after her knowing full well how they feel and frequently stating that she doesn’t have time for love. And yet about half the book is dedicated to her flip flopping back and forth between the two….and what bothers me even more is that people of authority seem to care so much without given reason. The president puts a lot of pressure on her to maintain her happy, love-struck front when there doesn’t initially seem to be much reason since they both know the truth—the only reason given over and over is that her attitude and relationship “defies the Capitol” because she tricked people by playing their Games….okay? And? I thought that was a point? It’s not like she’d be the first person to lie her way to victory. This is especially distracting by the end of the book when you can see how dire the situation is and has been for the country and how truly irrelevant her personal life would be to anyone in any position of power, much less the president. Basically the end of the book came and I still couldn’t see why everyone cared so much whether or not the public believed she was in love. If anything her admitting she was in love with another instead (or as well) would’ve been even more interesting to the star-struck public. Basically the romance in this book feels, to me, like drama for the sake of drama. And it got old fast.

 

And also, since when is Katniss innocent? Someone who has killed kids, broken the law, and played with people’s hearts to satisfy her needs is not someone I could consider innocent and I don’t see how others could see her that way. Strong, admirable, and courageous, yes. But innocent? And yet supposedly everyone acts weird around her to get attention or mess with her or…something. Take Finnick for example. Supposedly cocky and flirty, he presents himself to her one way and then becomes completely competent and useful the next time we meet him, almost instantly abandoning all mannerisms toward Katniss. I had this same issue with Haymitch in the first book and am wondering if this is just how Mrs. Collins writes her characters—setting them up to be so different and then turning them into the same thing. Honestly, I’m tired of every major character being so capable at rallying themselves and putting aside their flaws without addressing them. It takes all of the interest in said character out of the equation.

 

Despite how long and ranty this review appears however, I did have a mostly pleasant book reading experience. Certainly enough for me to put it down and jump right into Mockingjay, which is the conclusion of the series. Here’s hoping that it will justify some of the problems I had with Catching Fire. Or better yet, make me forget them entirely.

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Mockingjay

Rating: 4.5/5

Spoilers: Nah

 

Alright. I've gotta hand it to Mrs. Collins: she wrote a good wrap-up. After the rocky read that was book 2, Book 3 made up for the shortcomings. I still didn't care much for Katniss' character (especially at the beginning when she was still being frail and weepy) but as the book moved forward she became more of her hard, practical self.

 

More than likely the reason I enjoyed this book so much more is because the romance was downplayed a LOT in comparison to the first two novels. It was almost non-stop, world changing, society altering, going to war action. The last few chapters especially were impossible to put down. The epilogue left a bit to be desired, mostly because to told me nothing about the state of the world and yet recapped 20 years of a character's family life in a page and a half. Still kind of disappointed about that. I want to know, dangit!

 

One of the major things that the author has going for her is her ability to throw unforeseen curve balls. The constantly ending chapters with cliffhangers thing became a bit expected, thus preparing me each time for something to happen to one character or other. Kind of made me detach from most characters introduced in Mockingjay actually. But still, there are enough unexpected plot twists in this book that they pretty much drown out everything else and keep you occupied.

 

So anyway, yes. This series is worth reading if nothing else for the climactic conclusion. :)

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Hi Kasei 3.gif

 

Great reviews on the Hunger Games Trilogy :) I wanted to know more too about Katniss's family, did you like the ending? :)

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Hi Kasei 3.gif

 

Great reviews on the Hunger Games Trilogy :) I wanted to know more too about Katniss's family, did you like the ending? :)

 

All I can say about the ending was that it was appropriate. I mean, really it's the only way it could've ended and been relatively positive. Like I said before though, I would've liked to know more about the state of the world in the following 20 years than about Katniss' life.

 

 

However, when Katniss said she was for the Hunger Games for the enemy's children I wanted to strangler her. I was incensed with rage. I actually had to put down the book and call a friend of mine. Honestly, Peeta really could do so much better than her...but I guess being in love with her is as much a habit as anything else.

 

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