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    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     

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Found 3 results

  1. I've heard some differing opinions on whether or not plays should be assigned as reading in English classes in school. People who don't think it is a good idea generally seem to be of the mind that plays are meant to be seen, not read, which I don't neccessarily disagree with. Personally, I had to read several different plays in English throughout my high school/primary school years. I found that the times I retained the most and was most engaged was when my class read Hamlet and Death of a Salesman out loud together, with each person being assigned a different part. Hearing the play out loud definitely aided in comprehension. Those two also ended up being some of my favorite pieces of literature I read in school, too. I feel as if there are both pros and cons to it. On the negative side, you are not getting the full picture of what the play was intended to be by just reading it, and trying to make sense of a play by just the written words can be frustrating (shoutout to Shakespeare). I recall a great deal of my peers disliking it. On the positive side, reading plays in school exposes students to a whole area of literature they may not otherwise be exposed to, especially considering that not everybody has the means or interest/motivation to go see live theatre. Seeing it written out like that, it seems like there's a lot more negatives than positives, but I still feel like there is something really valuable in exposing students to plays as literature. What do you guys think? Is it a good, bad, or neutral? I'm also only looking at this from my experience with the American school system. Are plays usually part of the English curriculum in U.K. schools?
  2. This is the latest in a long line of Agatha Raisin mysteries (& to my shame, I've only read the first 4 of the series before this one - I can't seem to find them in the local shops!) & I found this lurking in my local library. As with the previous books, I've developed a strange liking to the heroine - her faults making her all the more likeable & I wasn't disappointed in this latest installment of her life either. I also liked the fact that even though I've missed so many books in between I was able to pick up on existing plotlines within her home village & her relationships with the other regular characters. It seems that the characters are consistent & well-developed, their relationships detailed well rather than being over-emphasised & the insight into Agatha's psyche is just as enlightening, frightening & amusing as ever! The given synopsis is as follows: 'Agatha Raisin's ex-husband James is engaged to be married to a beautiful young woman and Agatha has kindly been invited to the wedding. This is a difficult pill to swallow & to take her mind off it Agatha begins a flirtation with Sylvan, a Frenchman she met at James's engagement party. For further distraction she decides upon a holiday & flies off to Istanbul, where unfortunately she bumps into James & his fiancee, not once but twice - convincing him she is stalking them. So when the bride is murdered on her wedding day, naturally Agatha is Suspect Number One - though the situation is quickly turned on its head when the mother of the bride engages Agatha to take on the case of her murdered daughter! And then, somehow, Agatha's own life seems to be in danger as she sets about trying to solve the mystery of the dead bride, while defending herself (rather half-heartedly) against the advances of a very attractive & determined Frenchman.' As a whole, this book was highly enjoyable, I whizzed through it in a couple of days & was thoroughly immersed in the plotline, I enjoyed the different locations described this time round, finding it interesting in the way that Agatha interacted abroad rather than in her home village. The plot had sufficient twists & revelations to keep me interested, although I was disappointed that I guessed who the murderer was & the main plotline, although it was hinted at heavily throughout the majority of the last half of the book. There were, however, some interesting sidelines introduced - between for example Toni & Agatha - their relationship was looked at in a little more detail rather than just leaving it as employer & employee. All in all, it was an enjoyable book, all the loose ends tied up nicely & the main characters' lives were opened up enough to leave scope for more books to follow. I've started hunting the previous books down on Ebay as I do find these light enough to just grab & read for light entertainment.
  3. Hi everybody, I'm learning english and I would like to practice reading books. My preference about them is the Science-fiction, and I would like your recomndation about some books for me. thank you
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