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Delilah

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier

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I'm currently reading this again. I read it so long ago that I don't remember it anymore. I thought there were only moors in Yorkshire, I didn't know they also have moors in Cornwall. Also, I just learned that this inn still exists! Wow! I would love to stay there.

 

This novel has all my favorite Gothic elements!

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A great book, that I last read whilst staying close to Dartmoor, best read on dark windy nights :)

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In my youth I used to go Surfing in Cornwall twice a year. On the drive down we would always stop at Jamaica Inn for lunch before carrying on. They get a lot of coaches, so it's got a rather ugly extension on it that detracts from the original. But if you stay in the original part of the pub on a rainy, misty day, it's very atmospheric. It's been my brother's ambition to spend a night there.

 

Ian

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After reading Rebecca last year (my first Du Maurier), I've been meaning to read more of her books, so I think this will be the first one to make it on to my wishlist.

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I'd like to read more of her novels too. Rebecca is one of my favourite novels ever, but the only other of hers I've read is Rule Britannia - which was about as far removed from Rebecca as one could get! I think I quite enjoyed it, although it's many years since I read it.

 

I've been past Jamaica Inn a few times, but never stopped.

 

Delilah - it's a lovely part of the country if you ever get a chance to visit. :)

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I'd like to read more of her novels too. Rebecca is one of my favourite novels ever, but the only other of hers I've read is Rule Britannia - which was about as far removed from Rebecca as one could get! I think I quite enjoyed it, although it's many years since I read it.

 

I've been past Jamaica Inn a few times, but never stopped.

 

Delilah - it's a lovely part of the country if you ever get a chance to visit. :)

Would love to visit it of course! I just visited London last year for a week.

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In my youth I used to go Surfing in Cornwall twice a year. On the drive down we would always stop at Jamaica Inn for lunch before carrying on. They get a lot of coaches, so it's got a rather ugly extension on it that detracts from the original. But if you stay in the original part of the pub on a rainy, misty day, it's very atmospheric. It's been my brother's ambition to spend a night there.

 

Ian

I read online that its supposed to be haunted! I've visited a lot of historic sites in the US that say they are haunted as well but as of yet haven't seen anything! But then I never spent a night at a haunted inn!

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I read Rebecca this year and really enjoyed it, it also became one of my favourite books, so I am interested to read more by Daphne du Maurier and will put Jamaica Inn on my wishlist :-)

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"Jamaica" has always been a favourite of mine, too.

 

That Jem Merlyn ... what a loveable rogue he is! - and wouldn't we all just love to be whisked off by him, to an uncertain (but exciting) future ... :D

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"Jamaica" has always been a favourite of mine, too.

 

That Jem Merlyn ... what a loveable rogue he is! - and wouldn't we all just love to be whisked off by him, to an uncertain (but exciting) future ... :D

Yeah every romantic woman's wish! He's hot!

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Wow, I really want to bump Jamaica Inn up my TBR pile now. Although it sounds like it would be wonderful to go to England and stay in the Inn on a dark and stormy night and read it then. :D

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... but you might be kidnapped by the smugglers, Kylie - either spirits of the old ones, or modern "bad guys" :o

 

Hmm ... decisions, decisions! :)

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... but you might be kidnapped by the smugglers, Kylie - either spirits of the old ones, or modern "bad guys" :o

 

Hmm ... decisions, decisions! :)

 

I'll take a chance! :D I'd like to be ridiculously scared for a bit (yes, I know it's easy to say when I'm sitting here, nice and cosy and safe, in my well-lit lounge room!)

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I have read both Rebecca and Jamaica Inn and loved them both, so when I was in a 2nd hand bookshop recently I didn't hesitate to buy another of her books, The Glassblowers, even though I had never heard of it before. Unfortunately I was quite disappointed with it as it gets a bit too bogged down in the historical context and so the plot is very slow. She's an absolute master of suspense though and so nevertheless I will definitely read more of her thrillers; I'll just have to read the blurb a bit more closely next time to distinguish from her other styles!

 

Having never been to Cornwall I had no idea that Jamaica Inn was a real place - though possibly seeing it for real would spoil the vivid mental picture the book conjured in my head. Funny you should mention about the perception of moors being a Yorkshire thing too; I actually live very close to the Bronte moors and have visited the supposed Top Withens, but even with that bond I really couldn't get into Wuthering Heights, even though in many respects it is very similar to Jamaica Inn, which I loved...

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I have never read some Du Maurier yet I'd be very much interested. Would this book be a good start ? or would Rebecca be a better choice ? :lol:

 

 

Either would be a good choice although I passed Jamaica Inn on too a friend who normally only reads chick lit & she loved it :)

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My vote would be for "Jamaica" L.R.

 

Mary Yellan (our heroine) is a bit more feisty than the not-even-named 2nd Mrs De Winter.

 

I do like "Rebecca" too, but got a little impatient with the heroine's lack of backbone and gullibility, when she first arrived at the house.

She did get better, though - when Max needed her - in her own quiet way. :)

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She is also a master of short stories - that might be a good start to Du Maurier. The Birds and Don't Look Now are full of suspense. I found a great short novel of hers recently in OXFAM called The Scapegoat and that was great too.

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Loved reading Jamaica Inn, I was gripped from start to finish and could barely put the book down. I've read Rebecca as well and might get round to reading some more of Du Maurier's work when I get the chance.

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I picked up another Du Maurier favourite in Oxfam the other day - My Cousin Rachel - I haven't read this since I was at school (only last year you understand :giggle2: ) and I'm looking forward to reading it again shortly.

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I think this is my favourite du Maurier novel, I did visit it many years ago and enjoyed it, although I think it's been refurbished since.  Sadly due it's close proximity to the main road into Cornwall (actually pretty much the only road into Cornwall!) the constant thunder of traffic somewhat diminishes the spooky atmosphere!  Still worth a visit though, especially as a sort of fan pilgrimage.

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It's my favourite too du Maurier too and I agree that with the real inn being on a main road does diminish the spooky atmosphere so expertly crafted in her novel. I'm still glad I had the chance to visit though.

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I visited Jamaica Inn years ago and thought how quaint it was, that was before I realised it had been written about and that it was classed as very spooky.

 

Would love to go back and see it again, maybe sometime soon. 

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I picked up another Du Maurier favourite in Oxfam the other day - My Cousin Rachel - I haven't read this since I was at school (only last year you understand :giggle2: ) and I'm looking forward to reading it again shortly.

I love Daphne Du Maurier although it is a very long time for me too, since I read her books.

 

Rebecca was always wonderful, even as a child I was captivated. I loved My Cousin Rachel and The Scapegoat too, probably more. There is a wonderful darkness this author creates, using the landscape effectively in Jamaica, and Rebecca and the dark side of the soul in all her books.

Always worth re-reading and well written and easy to read. I recently loaned The Scapegoat to my daughter who was making a train journey and she loved it, Ms du Maurier is the master of "twists".

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