Jump to content
Weave

Haruki Murakami

Recommended Posts

I do recommend you read it if you didn't read much of his other works, because you'll be less harsh on it. I was disappointed because I read so many of his masterpieces and then comes this disappointment. My biggest problem with 1Q84 was how stretched it was, it could've ended in two books tops, the third one was nonsensical.

But, I'm in minority when it comes to his books, since I also didn't much enjoy reading The Norwegian Wood and some parts of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles, which seem to be his most popular works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I truly enjoyed IQ84.  I bought it and then read the reviews in retrospect of purchasing it as part of a price deal and was disheartened by what I had read particularly those that said you needed to be a seasoned reader of Marukami prior to coming to these books.  This was my first Marukami and I had debated buying other books first but then one night picked it up, read the first page and was sitting down before I knew it and within two weeks had the three read.  Whilst it does stretch over three books, there was this sublime element of description within the most mundane of actions of the characters that truly convey a true genius and there is much of that in the trilogy.  I tend to have a short attention span and I devoured those three books within a short time.  Perhaps as they are my first of his, they remain my favourite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this has been posted before but I found it quite interesting. Picture and sound quality is a little iffy.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^

 

Have saved that to youtube favourites to watch later :-)

 

Thanks for sharing Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^

 

Have saved that to youtube favourites to watch later :-)

 

Thanks for sharing Brian

 

You're more than welcome. I notice you are reading Norwegian Wood, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did, I adore that book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Don't watch the film version then!

 

I wasn't even aware there was a movie version but I'll definitely be avoiding it now, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be fair, it's not that bad.  It is very well filmed and looks gorgeous, but it felt very empty and it lacked the humour that was in the book.  I'd give it 3/5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I truly enjoyed IQ84.  I bought it and then read the reviews in retrospect of purchasing it as part of a price deal and was disheartened by what I had read particularly those that said you needed to be a seasoned reader of Marukami prior to coming to these books.  This was my first Marukami and I had debated buying other books first but then one night picked it up, read the first page and was sitting down before I knew it and within two weeks had the three read.  Whilst it does stretch over three books, there was this sublime element of description within the most mundane of actions of the characters that truly convey a true genius and there is much of that in the trilogy.  I tend to have a short attention span and I devoured those three books within a short time.  Perhaps as they are my first of his, they remain my favourite.

This is what I've been told as well. I'm a few chapters into 1Q84 and it's the first book of his I've read so far. I'm enjoying his writing and the story so far, but I've heard many people say that you should begin with Norwegian Wood to introduce yourself to his work.

I'm wondering whether I should switch and begin reading Norwegian Wood instead - particularly as it's much shorter than the trilogy of 1Q84.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what I've been told as well. I'm a few chapters into 1Q84 and it's the first book of his I've read so far. I'm enjoying his writing and the story so far, but I've heard many people say that you should begin with Norwegian Wood to introduce yourself to his work.

I'm wondering whether I should switch and begin reading Norwegian Wood instead - particularly as it's much shorter than the trilogy of 1Q84.

 

Don't listen to the reviewers. If  you are enjoying - then enjoy. Who cares if it isn't the 'best' book of his to start with or whatever. If you are enjoying the book, then enjoy it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really loved a wild sheep chase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've finished reading 1Q84, and I'm unsure how I feel about it.

 

On the one hand it was a story I was able to dive into from the first page. I loved Murakami's methods of interweaving the characters lives and their stories, leaving little hints that kept my eyes in the book well past midnight when I should have been asleep. I was also transfixed by his writing; he describes all the minute details of his characters lives, which really helped me to get to know them. Aomame and Tengo came alive for me while reading the book.

 

However, as a trilogy, I feel it went on for too long. The first two books were a fun read, and I kept coming back to the next chapter trying to figure out how everything was connected. By the third book though, I felt exhausted. His descriptions of the characters everyday lives, which had previously opened up his story for me, were now too much for me. At times trudging through the chapters became a chore.

 

One thing that stood out for me was the theme of loneliness, particularly how the main characters childhoods impacted their future relationships with others. I think Marukami handled this very well, and I was particularly touched by Ushikawa and Ayumi's stories. The idea of different worlds with different moons, and yet the importance of the reality revolving around where you are at that particular point was also an interesting topic.

 

I can see why Marukami has so many fans. He is clearly a very good writer, and he seems to write about topics that can be thought provoking. However, I think 1Q84 was a bit too much of him for me. I may have off diving into one of his shorter novels, just so I could catch my breath. I don't think I'll be able to touch another piece of work of his for a while. Not that I've been put off him - he is a great storyteller and I would like to continue to follow his work in the future. I just need a break from his work.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LOVED Norweigan Wood and The Wind Up Bird Chronicle, particulary the latter. His writing style is so compelling even though I often find his characters numb with little strong emotions either way. I found his last book Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki disappointing. It seemed like a poor imitation of Murakami, some of the translation was sloppy and his metaphors and descriptions very cliche and weak. There certainly is a lot of repeated elements in his books (cats, jazz, weird sexual encounters, lonely disconnected men) that sometimes he seems like a one trick pony but his trick is very, very good when he gets it right. I will get around to IQ84 (I love 1984 so a Murakami take on it has me interested.) and Kaftka on the Shore but given the repeated elements I don't feel the urge to rush out and get them. A nice period netween books seems like a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've finished reading 1Q84, and I'm unsure how I feel about it.

 

On the one hand it was a story I was able to dive into from the first page. I loved Murakami's methods of interweaving the characters lives and their stories, leaving little hints that kept my eyes in the book well past midnight when I should have been asleep. I was also transfixed by his writing; he describes all the minute details of his characters lives, which really helped me to get to know them. Aomame and Tengo came alive for me while reading the book.

However, as a trilogy, I feel it went on for too long. The first two books were a fun read, and I kept coming back to the next chapter trying to figure out how everything was connected. By the third book though, I felt exhausted. His descriptions of the characters everyday lives, which had previously opened up his story for me, were now too much for me. At times trudging through the chapters became a chore.

One thing that stood out for me was the theme of loneliness, particularly how the main characters childhoods impacted their future relationships with others. I think Marukami handled this very well, and I was particularly touched by Ushikawa and Ayumi's stories. The idea of different worlds with different moons, and yet the importance of the reality revolving around where you are at that particular point was also an interesting topic.

I can see why Marukami has so many fans. He is clearly a very good writer, and he seems to write about topics that can be thought provoking. However, I think 1Q84 was a bit too much of him for me. I may have off diving into one of his shorter novels, just so I could catch my breath. I don't think I'll be able to touch another piece of work of his for a while. Not that I've been put off him - he is a great storyteller and I would like to continue to follow his work in the future. I just need a break from his work.

 

 

Agree with your take on it. I believe Murakami is an author the reader has to be in the mood for, not just a "pick-up".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read Kafka on the Shore earlier this year and still can't decide if I really liked it or not.. it was quite an odd one.

 

It reminded me of a Studio Ghibli-esque film or one of those bizarre foreign movies you come across channel flicking at 1am on SBS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just discovered haruki murakami and i think i am in love with his style, his richly drawn characters, his atmosphere not to mention making my mind tick! - all a great formula for a great recipe. I just picked out one of his books at the library called 1q84. I don't know what attracted me to the book as sometimes a cover can do but my old friend Dasha read his books so i thought why not!?

Well now i am hooked, i am on page 200 on book one already. Only had it a couple of days or so! This guy can write! But have i made a mistake in reading one of his later novels first? I admit i went and bought 8 more of his books straight away and i don't normally do that with authors. I tend to like one or two by an author and find someone else but i have a feeling that i will love this guy!!!!!

Are there any other fans out there? or am i being too all knowing before i read the other books by him? After all i am only on page 200 of a novel he wrote ha ha!

Any other help will be appreciated and maybe some recommendations to similar styles? I must admit i kinnda love Japanese culture and would love to go there. x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've merged your post with an existing thread, Mabatbai. You'll find plenty of fans and recommendations in this thread. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 I found his last book Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki disappointing. It seemed like a poor imitation of Murakami, some of the translation was sloppy and his metaphors and descriptions very cliche and weak. There certainly is a lot of repeated elements in his books (cats, jazz, weird sexual encounters, lonely disconnected men) that sometimes he seems like a one trick pony but his trick is very, very good when he gets it right.

 

 

Gotta agree with this, he writes about pretty much the same things over and over again, but then again most authors do. It's like you're watching a series, there's new seasons but the characters the same and it's one story being dragged out told :D but I think that's what we all like about him (and other authors), the familiarity. That said, I found Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki... enjoyable and khmm familiar. Easy to read, engaging and made me think about my relationships with other people, be it friendship or of the romantic kind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki in the early hours of yesterday morning. The way the book finished surprised me, so it took a while for me to get my head around what I think Murakami was trying to do, but I really enjoyed it.

 

I agree that the writing isn't as good as his previous novels, I don't know if that is down to the translation or not, but I found the story compelling and I finished it in under a week (which is a rare event for me, recently!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Sputnik Sweetheart last week. I liked it a lot, but not as much as The Wind Up Bird Chronicle which I loved. It had an element of the surreal in it, which I'm guessing is a given with Murakami novels? I want to read all his other books, but I know I have to be in the right mood, as you do need to pay a lot of attention (well, I do anyway :lol:) while reading them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It had an element of the surreal in it, which I'm guessing is a given with Murakami novels?

 

Of the ones I have read Norwegian Wood is the only one that doesn't have any surreal happenings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×