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lunababymoonchild

Your Book Activity April 2022

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Posted (edited)

As said in March 2022, just bought : Dark Waters, Katherine Arden, number 3 in the Small Spaces Quartet, Pincher Martin, William Golding and King Rat, China Miéville.

Edited by lunababymoonchild

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Reading The Pink Front Door by Stella Gibbons. This is the fourth Stella Gibbons book I've read and have enjoyed them all, but Cold Comfort Farm was definitely her best.

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I'm reading Lost Dog by Kate Spicer for the book club and longing to get on to one of the new arrivals (I succumbed to temptation...), Mr Loverman - Bernardine Evaristo, The Murder of My Aunt - Richard Hall, Astonish Me - Maggie Shipstead, Homegoing - Yaa Gyasi, The City of Brass - SA Chakraborty

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Still reading Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell and I've just found the bit in the book that may have inspired Susanna Clarke to write Piranesi.

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1 hour ago, lunababymoonchild said:

Still reading Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell and I've just found the bit in the book that may have inspired Susanna Clarke to write Piranesi.

Oooh which part?? 

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13 hours ago, lunababymoonchild said:

Where Jonathan Strange walks through the mirror.

Oh yeah!! Actually I think there’s a part later that might back your theory up more. We’ll have to talk about it when you’ve finished! 

 

I’m still reading Kingsley’s The Water Babies but it is very slow going. I’m getting tempted to pick something else up and dip back into it later. [edit: no pun intended…]

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On 4/16/2022 at 8:17 AM, Hayley said:

 

I’m still reading Kingsley’s The Water Babies but it is very slow going. I’m getting tempted to pick something else up and dip back into it later. [edit: no pun intended…]

 

I remember reading this when I was a child and enjoying it. But I've often found when re-reading childhood books, they just don't have the same impact. On the other hand, there are several children's books I didn't read until an adult and I absolutely loved them. I regret not having read them as a child so I could compare my impressions. 

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28 minutes ago, poppy said:


…………….But I've often found when re-reading childhood books, they just don't have the same impact. On the other hand, there are several children's books I didn't read until an adult and I absolutely loved them. I regret not having read them as a child so I could compare my impressions. 


I do too. It seems that if you had read them as a child they would not have had the same impact upon you when you read them as an adult (if that makes sense!)

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I am caught in the Classic Reader's Dilemma.  I am desperate to find out what happens next but don't want the book to end. Fortunately the book is 1006 pages long so I do have a way to go, yet.

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Posted (edited)

I am currently reading The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. The first 25% of the book was very difficult for me. The next 25% was vastly improved but still somewhat difficult reading. The book is slow reading for me due to my difficulty but the more I read the more I realize what a great piece of literature it is. The prose is simply outstanding and although I don't want to give it my final rating until I finish the book it is undoubtedly one of the great books I have read. I will re-read this book after a period of time so that I will get an even better understanding of Faulkner's writing in "The Sound and the Fury".

Edited by muggle not

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9 hours ago, muggle not said:

I am currently reading The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. The first 25% of the book was very difficult for me. The next 25% was vastly improved but still somewhat difficult reading. The book is slow reading for me due to my difficulty but the more I read the more I realize what a great piece of literature it is. The prose is simply outstanding and although I don't want to give it my final rating until I finish the book it is undoubtedly one of the great books I have read. I will re-read this book after a period of time so that I will get an even better understanding of Faulkner's writing in "The Sound and the Fury".

The Sound and the Fury was the first William Faulkner that I read, in a group read on BGO.  We all struggled with it at the time but I was totally enchanted and intend to have another read of it too. Just checked, I read it in 2014! Time for a re-read methinks (after finishing my present read Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell).

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On 15/04/2022 at 9:17 PM, Hayley said:

Oh yeah!! Actually I think there’s a part later that might back your theory up more. We’ll have to talk about it when you’ve finished! 

Know what you mean now, and yes we will

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Posted (edited)

Just finished David Fairer's The Devil's Cathedral, the follow-up to his first book Chocolate House Treason.

These are both historical crime fiction, set in the reign of Queen Anne, and based on The Bay Tree Chocolate House in Covent Garden.  They are chunky books, both over 600 pages, but that's partly because they aren't as compactly produced as most paperbacks (better quality than most mass paperback, with binding that lets the book open flat) - the pages read very quickly.  Both are excellent reads.  The author is a retired Professor of 18th Century Literature, and his knowledge (especially of the language) and love of the period  shine through, bringing the period, and the books, vividly to life.  For me these were thoroughly immersive reads, with some lovely, quiet humour in amongst the action, which is thoroughly grounded in the politics and culture  of the time (and which he is also thoroughly knowledgeable about)  They're also good examples of how the 'big' publishing houses can completely miss the mark: these books were effectively self-published as the author hasn't been able to find a literary agent to take him on, and without an agent the publishers won't look at you. As a series, (the third of the trilogy is due out in October, so this is a provisional score!), a straight 6 out of 6, the highlight of the year to date; books that thoroughly deserve a wider audience.

Edited by willoyd

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Finished Ice Rivers by Jemma Wadham tonight: an account of various expeditions she has undertaken to glaciers as part of her research at Professor of Glaciology an Bristol University.  Inevitably episodic in nature. Whilst interesting - particularly some of the science she covers, it never particularly engaged me and, to be honest, I was quite glad it was a short 191 pages. Pleasant enough, but no more and thus, inevitably, mildly disappointing.  3 stars out of 6.

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Read Claire Keegan's Small Things Like These tonight - it's only 112 pages or so long and easily finished in an hour or so.  Beautifully written with a lot to say, but over too quickly to become fully immersed.  Just as I feel I've started to get to know the characters, it's all over and done with, something I struggle with when it comes to short stories, which this basically is.  4 stars out of 6.

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This is the last day of April. This month I've read three books. NOS4R2, Joe Hill, Jonathan Strange and Mr Norris, Susanna Clarke, Satantango, Laszlo Krasznahorkai.  Some 1,930 pages in all. Not bad.

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Started,and am struggling a bit, with 'Bloodline' by Felix Francis. I have read and enjoyed all the Dick Francis books, and the last few with his name on were allegedly co-written with his son Felix. The last few were 'okay' but not great. This one, under Felix' own name seems to be floundering around looking for a plot! I am about a third of the way through, and will finish it as a matter of course, but it has so far, failed to 'grab me' or my attention!

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I am currently reading Midnight Riot (book 1 of the Rivers of London series). I am about 50% into the book and am enjoying it.

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Haven't heard that title before, in the UK the first book is just called Rivers of London.  A very enjoyable series, glad you like it so far!

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Interesting, wonder why they changed the title?

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