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Chrissy

Chrissy's Reading In 2015

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2011 Reading
 
2012 & 2013 Reading
 
2014 Reading  

 

 1) Lord Peter Views The Body by Dorothy L Sayers
 2) The Unpleasantness At The Bellona Club by Dorothy L Sayers
 3) Strong Poison by Dorothy L Sayers
 4) Five Red Herrings by Dorothy L Sayers
 5) Finding Sky (+ Challenging Zed) by Joss Stirling 
 6) Stealing Phoenix by Joss Stirling
 7) Seeking Crystal by Joss Stirling
 8) Misty Falls by Joss Stirling
 9) We Were Liars by E Lockhart
10) Have His Carcase by Dorothy L Sayers
11) The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson
12) Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
13) The Boy In The Smoke by Maureen Johnson
14) The Name Of The Star by Maureen Johnson
15) The Madness Underneath by Maureen Johnson
16) The Shadow Cabinet By Maureen Johnson
17) Harry Potter & The Philosopher's Stone by JK Rowling
18) Harry Potter & The Chamber Of Secrets by JK Rowling
19) Harry Potter & The Prisoner Of Azkaban by JK Rowling
20) Harry Potter & The Goblet Of Fire by JK Rowling
21) Harry Potter & The Order Of The Phoenix by JK Rowing
22) Harry Potter & The Half Blood Prince by JK Rowling
23) Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling
24) A Morbid Taste For Bones (Cadfael) by Elis Peters
25) No Good Deed by Manda Scott
26) 18 Things (My So Called Afterlife) by Jamie Ayres
27) The Psalter by Galen Watson
28) Ill Wind (Weather Wardens) by Rachel Caine
29) Heat Stroke (Weather Wardens) by Rachel Caine
30) Chill Factor (Weather Wardens) by Rachel Caine
31) Fear Itself by Jonathan Nasaw
32) Every Day by David Levithan
33) I'll Give You The Sun by Jandy Nelson
34) Another Day by David Levithan
35) Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett
36) A Hat Full Of Sky by Terry Pratchett
37) Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett
38) I Shall Wear Midnight  by Terry Pratchett
39) The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde
40) Lost In A Good Book  by Jasper Fforde
41)The Well Of Lost Plots by Jasper Fforde
42) Something Rotten by Jasper Fforde
43) First Amongst Sequels by Jasper Fforde
44) One Of Our Thursdays Is Missing by Jasper Fforde
45) The Woman Who Died A Lot by Jasper Fforde
46) How The Marquis Got His Coat Back (short story) by Neil Gaiman
47) The Big Over Easy by Jasper Fforde
48) The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde
49) The Song Of The Quarkbeast by Jasper Fforde
50) The Eye Of Zoltar by Jasper Fforde
51) Angel Dares by Joss Stirling

52) Ketchup Clouds by Annabel Pitcher

Edited by Chrissy

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I am starting the year with a book of short stories featuring Lord Peter WImsey, and favourite detective of mine.

 

I will review when I am done, but thought I would start the thread with what I am up to.  :smile:  

Edited by Chrissy

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Hope your reading goes well in 2015 Chrissy... :readingtwo:

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I have never read any Dorothy L Sayers. I used to read quite a lot of detective type novels but I sort of overdosed on them in my 20s and don't tend to pick them up often.  I've enjoyed a few Agatha Christie books - I imagine (although I'm probably wrong?) that they are similarish?!  Happy reading. :)

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Have a great reading year Chrissy :)

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Thank you all. :smile: I wish you all a happy reading year. 

 

I had a good year of reading last year, and plan on carrying on with my reading decisions in the same way - if it grabs me I'll read it!  :D  I have worked hard at removing any sense of should, shouldn't and not agains. The plan is that I read something that carries me on (and often away) from myself, no matter the genre, age demographic or whether it is new to me or not. Life is definitely too short to allow my favourite pastime get bogged down with self imposed 'politics'. 

 

Janet, I would say that the Dorothy L Sayers are similar in lots of ways to the Agatha Christie novels, as they would have been written around the same time, so carry the same sensibility.

 

With the Sayers' books, I think if you develop a liking for Lord Peter's character you will love the series, but I would say that it hinges on that. He is definitely upper class, he has servants, lives in town, belongs to men-only clubs and rattles about the world with a insouciant manner most of the time. For me the character is also highly moral, sensitive, charismatic, perceptive and an intensely loyal man, capable of great humour and profound guilt. It may not be too obvious but I may just be a little taken by Lord Peter.  :blush2:

Edited by Chrissy

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I had a good year of reading last year, and plan on carrying on with my reading decisions in the same way - if it grabs me I'll read it!  :D  I have worked hard at removing any sense of should, shouldn't and not agains. The plan is that I read something that carries me on (and often away) from myself, no matter the genre, age demographic or whether it is new to me or not. Life is definitely too short to allow my favourite pastime get bogged down with self imposed 'politics'. 

 

Well put! I hope this great attitude of yours takes you to some great places this year! :smile2: I still remember how long you struggled with your mojo, so I think you deserve another fantastic reading year! :)

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It definitely sounds like a FictionCrush™ to me, Chrissy! :lol:

 

Thanks. :)  I take it that it would be best to start with the first one? Presumably that introduces the character(s)/settings for future books?  

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Well put! I hope this great attitude of yours takes you to some great places this year! :smile2: I still remember how long you struggled with your mojo, so I think you deserve another fantastic reading year! :)

 

I agree with all of this! I hope your great reading streak continues, Chrissy. With your positive attitude, it's bound to! :)

 

I've never really considered reading anything by Sayers before, but I love Agatha Christie, so maybe I should give Wimsey a go. You've painted such as interesting picture of the character that I'm now intrigued. Dare I ask how many books there are? Is Wimsey an older gentleman, like Poirot?

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Just wanted to say thank you for my christmas card! I got it a bit after christmas. :)

 

 

Happy Reading in 2015!

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Your welcome Devi.  :smile:

 

Thanks Kylie. I can definitely recommend Dorothy L Sayers. She wrote 11 of the books, with a few pretty good final ones written by an associate/fan. Lord Peter is around 40 years old in the books (in his late 30's in the first one).  :smile:

Edited by Chrissy

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Happy reading in 2015, Chrissy  :smile:

 

You know what's needed, don't you - some David Gemmell  :giggle2:

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Thanks Kylie. I can definitely recommend Dorothy L Sayers. She wrote 11 of the books, with a few pretty good final ones written by an associate/fan. Lord Peter is around 40 years old in the books (in his late 30's in the first one).  :smile:

 

Thanks for the info. :) 11 sounds manageable! I was afraid you were going to say that Sayers was as prolific as Christie!

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1) Lord Peter Views The Body by Dorothy L Sayers

 

Nine short stories with Lord Peter at the centre of each. They vary in length, and none are entirely predictable, which is surprising because I read this collection a few years ago!.  :smile:

 

My plan is to work my way through the Wimsey series, interspersing them with other books. Can't wait!  :D

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Thanks Kay.  :smile:

 

2) The Unpleasantness At The Bellona Club by Dorothy L Sayers

 

I decided to head straight into another Lord Peter Wimsey story, so next in the series was this one. Following a visit with his dying sister, General Fentiman is found dead. The General had suffered with a heart condition for years, so surely his death was not a surprise? No one would have thought more of it had there not been a proviso in the wills that was dependent upon the timing of each death. 

 

Aside from the development of the plot and the characters in this 1928 novel, I found the many references to the Great War (World War One) both fascinating and touching. Sayers clearly had great sympathy and understanding for the post war suffering of those who served. It is a depth to the story that is unexpected but seamlessly included.  

 

(I have already started on my next Sayers book :smile:

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