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chesilbeach

Your Book Activity - November 2014

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Halfway through Graham Masterton's Drought, probably the best Masterton bok ive read so far

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Still tentatively pushing Hurwitz's I See You to the other site but I will get back to it soon...

 

Sadly not enough to read as I'd like (work, bleurgh!) but I did get through a hundred or so pages of Richard Montanari's The Devil's Garden before bed. *gulp* I'm a big fan - as far as crime thrillers go he's got that page-turning suspense down to a tee.

Edited by Ben

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I'm beginning to wish she'd just get out of her own head for once and look around.

 

I've seen that criticism elsewhere. Well, I've seen the criticism that she's too self-absorbed and had a charmed life. I think (and none of this is directed towards what you've said) she's actually extremely self-aware and self-deprecating. Some people speak as though she shouldn't have any complaints or problems because her family was relatively well off, but that's a load of crock. Of course rich people can have problems and be depressed!

 

As for her obsession with sex, well I guess she did speak about it a lot, but not so much that it annoyed me. Perhaps those events were defining moments for her. *shrugs* Anyway, I totally understand how the things you mentioned are annoying. Personally I was hoping to hear a little more about her TV show, but there weren't many insights there...

 

 

I visited T S Eliot's grave a few years ago.  His ashes were interred under this tablet in East Coker church in Somerset.  :)

 

Aw, that's nice. :) You're so lucky to have so much literary history around you!

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I've seen that criticism elsewhere. Well, I've seen the criticism that she's too self-absorbed and had a charmed life. I think (and none of this is directed towards what you've said) she's actually extremely self-aware and self-deprecating. Some people speak as though she shouldn't have any complaints or problems because her family was relatively well off, but that's a load of crock. Of course rich people can have problems and be depressed!

 

I don't know so much about her to have known that she's coming from a privileged background, I didn't know anything about her past and where she comes from. Of course well off people can have problems, too, and complain about them, I'm with you on that one.

 

And I also think that Lena's self-aware and self-deprecating, but unfortunately she does it in such a subtle, perhaps non-humoristic way that I sometimes forget that she doesn't mean for herself to be taken so seriously. I don't blame Lena for that, it's just that I guess I'm not on the same wave length as her. I have nothing against her as a person, I love how she's being herself and not conforming to what everyone thinks she should look like and be like :)

 

 

As for her obsession with sex, well I guess she did speak about it a lot, but not so much that it annoyed me. Perhaps those events were defining moments for her. *shrugs* Anyway, I totally understand how the things you mentioned are annoying. Personally I was hoping to hear a little more about her TV show, but there weren't many insights there...

I didn't get very far in the book (maybe 80 pages or so), but there wasn't a lot of talk about her writing and her show and career. So that was a disappointment for me, too. Too bad she didn't get to that more in the later chapters, either.

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Well, after struggling to finish Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, I decided I really couldn't get on with it. Unfortunately, I was already a couple of hundred pages in. I find even if I really dislike a book, I hate to give up. I just can't stand books that overuse accent as if that's a good substitute for character personality and development. It may be 'realistic', but it's nigh on impossible to read without getting a headache. :'(

 

I'm now reading The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which I really like. The characters are interesting and the relationships are well developed. I notice there are a lot of similar elements in the Bronte's novels, with a lot of descriptive scenery and troubled romance.

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Well, after struggling to finish Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, I decided I really couldn't get on with it. Unfortunately, I was already a couple of hundred pages in. I find even if I really dislike a book, I hate to give up. I just can't stand books that overuse accent as if that's a good substitute for character personality and development. It may be 'realistic', but it's nigh on impossible to read without getting a headache. :'(

Awww that's a shame to hear. The book is on my wishlist but I think your criticism would annoy me too!

 

I started to read James Dashner - The Maze Runner 3: The Death Cure yesterday, I'm only on page 18 atm, almost at chapter 5, but so far it's interesting. I look forward to read more in it later today.

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Well, after struggling to finish Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, I decided I really couldn't get on with it. Unfortunately, I was already a couple of hundred pages in. I find even if I really dislike a book, I hate to give up. I just can't stand books that overuse accent as if that's a good substitute for character personality and development. It may be 'realistic', but it's nigh on impossible to read without getting a headache. :'(

 

I'm now reading The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which I really like. The characters are interesting and the relationships are well developed. I notice there are a lot of similar elements in the Bronte's novels, with a lot of descriptive scenery and troubled romance.

 

I am in total agreement SunnyShadows. I kept reading in the hope of some amazing development later in the book which would bring it all together and blow my mind. Sadly it did not happen. I'm just not a fan. I particularly hated the middle story. I have not read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall but was not a particular fan of the other Bronte sisters work.

 

I just finished The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion which I loved. Simple storyline but laugh out loud funny and I find the way he writes the character of Don Tillman makes me totally understand his unique point of view.

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I just finished The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion which I loved. Simple storyline but laugh out loud funny and I find the way he writes the character of Don Tillman makes me totally understand his unique point of view.

That's great to hear/read :)! I'm waiting for the English paperback release, I really liked the first book.

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I finished reading The Scorch Trials and haven't started reading The Death Cure.

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I'm now reading The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, which I really like. The characters are interesting and the relationships are well developed. I notice there are a lot of similar elements in the Bronte's novels, with a lot of descriptive scenery and troubled romance.

I must read this soon. I'm currently reading a biography of Charlotte and am gaining a real insight into the girls and how they lived etc. I have read Agnes Grey but really want to read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall as most regard it as Anne's masterpiece. The sad thing is .. neither Emily or Anne knew that their books would become so celebrated. Only Charlotte had success in her lifetime. They'd all be amazed though at just how famous their books and their names have become.

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Awww that's a shame to hear. The book is on my wishlist but I think your criticism would annoy me too!I started to read James Dashner - The Maze Runner 3: The Death Cure yesterday, I'm only on page 18 atm, almost at chapter 5, but so far it's interesting. I look forward to read more in it later today.

 

 

The book has its good points, so I'd say it's still worth a go. I just really can't move past accents. XD I also didn't really know where the story was going, nor was I that invested in the characters, and I was a good way through. I'm glad you're enjoying your book, though! :)

 

I must read this soon. I'm currently reading a biography of Charlotte and am gaining a real insight into the girls and how they lived etc. I have read Agnes Grey but really want to read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall as most regard it as Anne's masterpiece. The sad thing is .. neither Emily or Anne knew that their books would become so celebrated. Only Charlotte had success in her lifetime. They'd all be amazed though at just how famous their books and their names have become.

It was so sad that they all died so young, and around the same time. It must have been sad for Charlotte who outlived all her siblings. I read she was terribly saddened by her sisters' lack of success.

 

I'd like to read Agnes Grey as well, since Anne's books are probably the least well known. I think it's amazing that three sisters should all become famous authors.

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I finished Gold by Dan Rhodes yesterday, and I thought it was great.  In fact, as I think back on it and contemplate the story more, the more it makes me smile.  Dan Rhodes is definitely going on my list of authors to read more of, but I'll have to be careful, as I think there are some that won't suit me! :D

Yippee!! This is very good news indeed Claire  :exc: brilliant! I do like Dan Rhodes' other work but this will always be my fave so I think you've read the best one first  :blush2: He can be a bit macabre ... not to say sick and twisted :D .. but there's always humour. I borrowed some from the library but I'll dig out what I have and put them aside for you .. you'll know within a few pages if they're for you or not.

You are officially included in the Gold fan club now .. woohoo!!  :17:  :doowapstart:

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I just finished The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion which I loved. Simple storyline but laugh out loud funny and I find the way he writes the character of Don Tillman makes me totally understand his unique point of view.

 

Very pleased to hear you enjoyed this novel so much! Don is such a darling character :wub: And the book is so funny! :) 

 

I was reading Confessions of a Sociopath in bed last night, but started feeling I wanted to read something fictitious instead, so I picked up Rebuilding Coventry by Sue Townsend which I borrowed from the library yesterday. I've read the book once before, but I've been dying to re-read it. I'm enjoying it a  lot more this time around for some reason :smile2: 

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I finished The Maze Runner last night, kept me up late!  A great read.  I am starting The Scorch Trials (Maze Runner series, Book 2) right now.

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It was so sad that they all died so young, and around the same time. It must have been sad for Charlotte who outlived all her siblings. I read she was terribly saddened by her sisters' lack of success.

Yes .. and she did all she could to promote them. They were published during Anne and Emily's lifetime but there wasn't much interest (now I've just seen that Wiki says that The Tenant was wildly successful .. and sold out .. but that Charlotte prevented it being re-published .. hmmm .. I need to do more research I think). At the moment (in the biog) Charlotte is editing Wuthering Heights (after Emily's death) for re-publication .. not sure if that is the version we know or not. The biog is written by Elizabeth Gaskell (who knew Charlotte) so it's not written from a contemporary point of view and it could be said to be slightly biased. I know Mrs Gaskell was commissioned by Charlotte's father to write it and it's said that she omitted things that might cause him upset etc. The Bronte Parsonage museum lay great faith in Elizabeth's words but not sure if I'm getting the whole truth.  Wiki of course is not the fount of all knowledge either :D  Lord!! .. 400 pages and I still need to read a more thorough account :D 

I'd like to read Agnes Grey as well, since Anne's books are probably the least well known. I think it's amazing that three sisters should all become famous authors.

Isn't it .. and considering what confined lives they led .. Emily in particular (she hated being away from home, didn't really socialise with anyone except her sisters and was a woman of few words) it is just amazing that she could have written a book with so much passion in it and with such an outspoken heroine. Anne's books seem like Anne herself .. quieter or less noticed but for all that equally as valuable.

 

They had two elder sisters too who died young, their brother died shortly before Emily and their mother had died long before. Poor Mr Bronte outlived them all and must have been so, so, sad when his last precious child passed away :( 

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Maybe it was just Emily, then. The description in the front of my copy of The Tenant says it was popular, but I believe it was rather controversial and criticised. I'd like to read about the Brontes since I enjoy their books, but I'll probably wait till I've read all the books since I don't want to read any spoilers. I'd love to visit the museum someday, too.

 

I believe they read a lot and had great imagination, so I suppose the isolation gave them a need for writing stories.

 

I know there was quite a bit of drama relating to Branwell, as well, and Anne blamed herself for it.

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You are officially included in the Gold fan club now .. woohoo!!  :17:  :doowapstart:

Thanks! When does my membership card arrive? :D

 

I'm reading Grace Williams Says It Loud by Emma Henderson at the moment. It's for my book group next week, so I need to get it finished today … head down, no distractions …  :readingtwo:  :readingtwo:  :readingtwo:

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I'd love to visit the museum someday, too.

Definitely worth a visit - but make sure it's not during the tourist season, as all atmosphere disappears under the crush. Best time is mid-winter, on a stormy/gloomy day, midweek. We're lucky in that it's fairly close (I can see Haworth from the hills the other side of Keighley when I drive into work), so were able to pick the time, but it is worthwhile. Quite uncanny standing in the dining room (the first room you visit) and thinking that this was where so much was written, and where Emily died.

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Just re: the Bronte discussion, I live about ten minutes away from where they lived in Thornton. If that...

 

I finished The Devil's Garden by Richard Montanari this morning, after sensibly not pushing myself any later than quarter to three in the small hours last night in order to get it done. Really enjoyed it, as usual with his novels. I liked the unique approach of knowing who the killer was from the start rather than the traditional 'whodunnit'. Don't get me wrong, he's great at the former as well - but it's good to mix it up a bit.

 

This one was suitably gripping and had an interesting plot to it - would definitely recommend to those that appreciate murky crime thrillers.

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I just downloaded "For Whom The Bell Tolls" by Ernest Hemingway. I don't believe I have previously read this book but will soon find out. :) One of my favorite books was The Old Man And The Sea by Hemingway.

 

I have 6 books on hold at the library and hopefully they will start becoming available soon.

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I just downloaded "For Whom The Bell Tolls" by Ernest Hemingway.

My top 5 of all time for sure, if not my top 3.  :smile:

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Finished Moonfleet, and now on to The Innocence of Father Brown. Ploughing through it, but not quite sure why as it's very disappointing - really dull, all the short stories pretty much the same plot: somebody gets killed, something odd happens/goes with it, everybody guesses wrong, Father Brown sees it and immediately solves the problem with a solution that would be highly unlikely (and sometimes nigh on impossible) in real life.

Books acquired recently (spending birthday book tokens!):
The Saint-Fiacre Affair by Georges Simenon
The Savage Storm by David Andress
The Long Shadow by David Reynolds
The English and their History by Robert Tombs

Germany, Memories of a Nation by Neil Macgregor
The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jaaskaleinen

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