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East Sussex - Winnie-The-Pooh by A. A. Milne

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EAST SUSSEX
 
Winnie-The-Pooh by A. A. Milne
 
Synopsis:
AA Milne, born in 1882, based the characters of Pooh Bear, Eeyore the Donkey, Piglet, Tigger, Kanger and Roo on his son, Christopher Robin's real nursery toys. The Milne family live in Ashdown Forest and the stories of their adventures are based there. 
 
You are cordially invited into the Hundred Acre Wood. Meet Pooh, Eeyore and the rest of the friends.
 
 
Other East Sussex books:
 
Mapp and Lucia by E. F. Benson
Brighton Rock by Graham Greene
Between The Acts by Virginia Woolf 
The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell

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I might read one of the other choices for East Sussex as I have read this before (many times!), but as this is one of my all-time favourite children's books I thought I would re-read it anyway.
 
I have posted a review of it in my reading log but I just wanted to add here that although it doesn't necessarily give a feeling of East Sussex it has made me even more determined to visit Five Hundred Acre Wood in Ashdown Forest on which the Hundred Acre wood was based. 

 

Despite the fact that this book is nearly 90 years old it still feels fresh to me.  And I really appreciate the humour in the book - probably more than I did when I read it as a child.  Also, as an adult the different traits of Pooh's friends really come across - I'd always been aware of "gloomy old eeyore" but as a child I didn't really appreciate the personalities of the other characters. 

 

Top stuff!

 

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How about “Sherlock Holmes - Gods of War” by James Lovegrove. The action takes place in 1913 when Holmes has retired from his "consulting detective" practice, but does involve him and Watson solving a murder.  The action mainly takes place in East Sussex (Eastbourne, East Dean - where Holmes lives, and Alfriston).

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Hi David - welcome to the forum :welcome2:

 

Thanks for the suggestion for East Sussex.  We've actually already had a discussion about the books chosen for each county over here -> http://www.bookclubforum.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/12146-the-english-counties-challenge/.  Anyone taking part in the challenge can tailor it to their own preferences, but we tried to come up with the list of the most famous book for each county, and Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes was actually chosen for two other counties (Dorset and Greater London).  As Sherlock Holmes: Gods of War is a very recently published book, it wouldn't really fit our criteria for the most famous book of the county, but if anyone wanted their own challenge to be to read any book set in the county, then they could choose it for their own challenge if they wanted. :)

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Read this one a couple of months ago … my first time reading it, can you believe?

Review:
Another book from the English Counties Challenge, and surprisingly, a classic children's book I've never read (I've also never seen the film adaptations either). Winnie-The-Pooh is obviously a well-known, well-loved character, so it's not like I wasn't aware of him, and I'd maybe heard the books read on Jackanory when I was little, but I'd never actually read one myself. What an utterly charming book this was. A delight to read from start to end, and a lovely introduction to all the characters of the Hundred Acre Wood, I can't imagine anyone would fail to fall in love with this book and all the characters in it, and it would make absolutely perfect reading as a bedtime story for young children. Lovely.

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Winnie-the-Pooh by AA Milne ******
(Mini-review copied from my blog thread)

I haven't read this classic for many years in spite (or maybe because?) of the fact that I have such joyful memories of it from my childhood (and reading it to my own child). Indeed, I came to it with slight trepidation, as it really is one of those books which is so ingrained in the fabric of my child-orientated memory that I was worried the gloss might come off it reading it purely as an adult.

I needn't have worried! Beautifully written, wiith something that strikes a chord on every page, and so much gentle humour, it was easy to see why this continues to maintain its position as one of the great classics of children's literature. I was doubly fortunate to be reading the Folio Society edition, with the wonderful EH Shepard drawings in colour (along with examples of his original sketches as an appendix) - the book simply wouldn't have been the same without them.

Any child who has only encountered Winnie-the-Pooh through the Disney version has surely missed out on one of the great childhood experiences, the film being a very pale shadow of the original. Words can't really do the book justice; suffice to say, it is sheer genius.

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