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A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

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I did enjoy this book, although I wasn't as captivated at the beginning as I'd expected to be after enjoying The Kite Runner so much. After reading the first couple of chapters, it was a few weeks before I picked it up again to continue with it, and I actually had to re-read the chapters again as I'd forgotten them already. Once I got into it, though, I whizzed through it, and was totally engrossed. However, I did feel a bit let down by the ending. I get the feeling that the author wants to give readers hope that there is potential in the future for Afghanistan, and for me, it didn't feel like a genuine, truthful conclusion for all the characters.

 

Definitely worth reading, though, and I have recommended it to others, particularly those who loved The Kite Runner.

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Love this book! .. To me, was even better than "The Kite Runner." The story is just hard to put down, and the writing is done really well. Will post more later as almost my bedtime!

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I have this book and im looking forward to reading it! To many books to read so little time!:lol:

 

The amount of times I've said that surprises even me! :lol:

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Fraaid I didn't enjoy this very much. yes the subject was harrowing but I thought he doesn't write well enough to overcome the simplistic charecterisation and predictable plot.

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The writer: I wish I could meet this physician/husband/possessor of a great vocabulary. I am guessing he must be a very warm and engaging person to speak with. Thank goodness he had people around him to help him share what life was like from the 1970s to the near-present in Afghanistan. I may know a little more than the average nineteen-year-old about what has happened and is happening in the rest of the world, but this man's simple presentation of Kabul, the city with potential, let me know I still should think a lot more about the world outside of my own little circle.

The story (more important to me): I checked out A Thousand Splendid Suns in December. I spent much of my break sitting with my mom since she had major surgery on the 21st, and I wanted to use the time without homework to catch up on reading for pleasure. Thankfully my dad consented to drop me off at the local library. I am thankful for this forum, since I probably wouldn't have heard enough about this book to spot it and check it out myself without you guys. Anyway, I had such a hard time tearing myself away from Suns! Usually I don't show too much outward emotion when I read; but my mom kept having to ask me what was wrong, as I would verbally grunt in frustration at how unfair the characters had it, or audibly gasp at the horror of what took place in their country and family. That doesn't mean you're going to feel miserable reading it - it's how compelling a story it is! I think the plight of the two women and the few good people around them will bring forth compassion from the surliest person.

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Im reading this book at the moment, im only on page 50 but enjoying it so far, think its still warming up though. It seems like a really interesting story. Has anyone else read this? What did you think?

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Threads merged. :lol:

 

Sarah - I thought it was wonderful. I wasn't sure if he could improve on The Kite Runner - but for me, he did.

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I'm reading A Thousand Splendid Suns at the moment. It's got me completely hooked. I read The Kite Runner and though I enjoyed it, I think I'm liking this one more. Can't wait to get back to it. Will come back when I've finished. :blush:

 

Well, I've just finished reading this remarkable book. I absolutely loved it, even though it was so harrowing at times. I found the characters believable and felt for them every step of the way. I found this book much more engaging than The Kite Runner, maybe simply because the main characters in this one are female. I can't recommend this highly enough.

Edited by sparkle1106
Finished book

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I've not long finished this book and thought it was amazing. It initially appealed to me because it was set in Afghan and my huuby has been out there several times as he is in the army. I really enjoyed it and couldnt stop thinking about the characters inbetween reading it!

Will have to give kite runner a go soon but as others have said it is quite similar I might wait a while.

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Now, I don't know that I would agree that they are quite similar. I think they're nothing alike - unless you count that they are written by the same author & both take place in Afghanistan..............................................

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I have read both and yes, I think that A Thousand Splendid Suns was better. I agree it makes you go up and then down in the same page. The story is unbelievable.

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a-thousand-splendid-suns.jpg

Waterstones Synopsis:

 

Mariam is only fifteen when she is sent to Kabul to marry Rasheed. Nearly two decades later, a friendship grows between Mariam and a local teenager, Laila, as strong as the ties between mother and daughter. When the Taliban take over, life becomes a desperate struggle against starvation, brutality and fear. Yet love can move a person to act in unexpected ways, and lead them to overcome the most daunting obstacles with a startling heroism.

I did not enjoy The Kite Runner so was apprehensive when I started this book. I didn't need to be - I thoroughly enjoyed it. It is harrowing and disturbing and completely readable. Hosseini writes a good, moving story. With terrorism such a real issue in the 21st century I felt he is brave writing this book as it features not only the Soviets, but the Taliban and 9/11. This could be seen as acontroversial thing to do, but I felt Hosseini dealt with these horrors in a commendable way.

Hosseini writes some great characters. I felt something towards all of them. I felt for Mariam and what she faced in Herat before moving to Kabul, and my heart broke with Laila's many times. And I did not like Rasheed - what a horrid man. I wanted him to be punished; he really sparked some anger in me - which I think is a sign of a good character and a well written book.

This book does contain a whole host of horrors, but not really ones I was expecting. War is prominent throughout the majority of the book, but it is not all Taliban based. The first half of the book sees the Soviets in Afghanistan. The horrors faced by the women mainly occurred at home at the hands of Rasheed as well. I felt that the blurb was a bit misleading in this respect. It is a bit of a disturbing read, but I found myself wanting to know what happened, and actually it didn't take me long to read. I don't think this book is for the weak hearted, but it is definitely up there with my other high-rated books. I think this story will stay with me for a long time.

9/10

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I haven't read A Thousand Splendid Suns, though I did read The Kite Runner and I really enjoyed it. Seeing that many of you said A Thousand Splendid Suns is even better I'll certainly check it out.

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I finished it this weekend. It was my first book by Hosseini having last year only watched the movie of 'The Kite Runner'. Very very emotional book, or maybe I'm just emotional. My heart goes out to the Miriams and Lailas of this world, no matter where they live, what culture or religion they're from. No female should have to go through abuse.

 

Thanks to stories by Hosseini, I'm learning and understanding more about Afghanistan now. After watching 'The Kite Runner', I realised they had an interesting culture and reading 'A thousand splendid suns' has taught me more, it's very sad how their country was demolished and devastated by successive wars and terrible governments. I look at Afghanistan with a different view now thanks to these stories.

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I have got this one to read which was passed onto me by a friend, but something else always gets ahead of it, I will read it eventually though

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Have just ordered this on the strength of the reviews here, thank you. Another lovely book about Afghanistan is "Under A Million Shadows" by Andrea Busfield, written from the viewpoint of a young boy. Very lightly written with many moments that will make you smile but still having a very serious undertone.

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The first time I started to read this book, I could not get into the story and gave up a few pages in. A few months later I started to read and couldn't put it down.

The book takes the reader through a string of emotions and I found myself holding back the tears on numerous occassions.

Very powerful and how wonderful to read of a time when Kabul was not so war torn. One of my favourates! :D

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One of the best books I have read this year - although I thought The Kite Runner just edged it for me

 

Ian

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One of the best books I have read this year - although I thought The Kite Runner just edged it for me

 

Ian

 

glad u liked it :D

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