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dogmatix

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Posts posted by dogmatix


  1. Okay Sophia I just finished up. What an ending!

     

     

    It's as if the superintendant knew he was bound to be killed and martyred himself as a final solution. I loved the images of the fountain woman waiting for the water to flow. And what a surpirse... after the interior minister was fired I thought, "Great now thing will get back to some normalcy and sense will rule and then out of nowhere the wife of the doctor is killed by the very same man. Great, great ending:readingtwo:

     

     

    "Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we pracice to deceive"

     

    So Stone Raft in a couple of months then? :D


  2. Just remember Pontalba I realy didn't like Lolita (shame I know) but I loved Speak, Memory and it was only with your persistent recommendation that I even picked it up.

     

    If you wan't non politcal and fabulous I would strongly recommend The Double first. It's my favorite Saramago and I promise no politics.


  3. First off I think that the popularity of cat literature is such a strange phenomenon. I don't mean that it's unwarranted, it just surprizes me. Somehow cats and books or cats and readers just seem to "fit". Maybe it's because cats love to keep your lap warm while you read. And God knows ya can't read with a cold lap.

     

    Anyways as a child I read Tailchaser's Song by Tad Wiliams.

     

    I also have on my shelf as part of my large Richard Adams collection The Beaurocats (haven't read it)

     

    Someday I'd like to pick up a couple of books in that mystery series The Cat Who.....


  4. Geeze Muggs and I haven't bought you anything for Xmas. :D

     

    Glad to see the move is "moving" along and you'll be in for the holidays.

     

    BTW Brian sold his first home yesterday. He is so excited and I'm so proud of him. He's already looking at lots to build the next one.

     

    Haven't tried anything new this week, mostly been staying with my standards Toasted Head and Diamond Claret, which I stocked up on last week. I did by a new set of wine glasss though. Perhaps it's time for a trip back to Total Wine with a printout of this thread in hand.

     

    Keep the suggestions comming everyone.


  5. I loved that bit too muggle, it was beautiful. And when he sees her for the last time in Paris, I remember thinking how Nabokov really loves and more importantly likes women. I always feel that he held women in awe a bit. He was a sensualist to the Nth degree and almost worshiped women, but in a good way.

    :D That is an excellent description and really hits the nail on he head. Muggle you've got a little VN in you don't ya?

     

    So Pontalba I won't be ready for a while (got several others screeming to be read) but what book should be next in my VN journey?


  6. Wow what a great post. I am so glad you liked this book as much as I.

     

    I love your points and heartily agree with them all.

     

    Why didn't she go blind? Really I have no idea either. Your point on optimism is well stated though. I wonder though; was she optimistic merely as a survival tactic, to preseve herself?

     

    The bathing scene was touching and gorgeous. What did you think about the dog of tears? How heartwrenching was that? Certainly made me cry.

     

    The amazing thing about Saramago is how he can evoke strong images and emotions with little use of descriptives.

     

    As for your question about Seeing. Why don't you jump over to our little thread on it? Hint. hint..... you'll recognized some familiar characters there.


  7. I was up half the night reading.....Okay the government's cleary insane and interested in it's own survival here. Saramago is making such a powerful statement about how limited the power of the peple in a democracy really could be if they allow it. Or do they have a choice?

     

    "All your suffering will have been futile, all you stubborness in vain, and then you will understand, too late, that rights only exist fully in the words and on the piece of paper on which they were recorded, whether in the form of a constitution, a law or a regulation, you will understand and, one hopes, be convinced, that their wrong or unthinking application will convulse the most firmly established society, you will understand at last, that simple common sense tells us to take them as a mere symbol of what could be, but never as a possible concrete reality"

     

    Another great line:

     

    "..they are preparing to hold a demonstration. What on earth do they hope to achieve by that, demonstrations never achieve anything, if they did, we wouldn't allow them..."

     

     

    So Saramago is exploring here the power of peaceful protestation in the extreme. I'm excited to see if the public will be able to "hold out" and not

    resort to violence as the government clearly has.

     


  8. a friend recommended a german or canadian 'ice wine'...aanybody ever try any? How about you Muggle?? Dogmatix??

     

    I just read a big article about ice wines but I've not tried one yet. Let me know if you do.

     

     

    Oh and Pilgrim, I also enjoy Rosemont Estate Merlot. I've bought it a couple of times.


  9. Well I'm a bit further on now and this sentence really gave me serious chills

     

    "In the end they'll say you lied, you'll deny it, you'll swear you told the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, and that might be true, you didn't lie, you just happen to be a very nervous person, with a strong will, it's true, but you are nevertheless a tremulous reed that shivers in the slightest breeze, so they'll connect you up to the machine again and it will be even worse, they'll ask if you're alive and you'll say, of course I am, but your body will protest, will contradict you, the tremor in your chin will say, no you're dead, and it might be right, perhaps your body knows before you do that they are going to kill you."

     

    eerie...

     

    I also love when he says that "inalienable rights" should only be employed in "homeopathic doses....drop by drop.......you can't come here with a pitcher overflowing...." In otherwords you can't exercise your rights in any way which will be effective. It's more the principle of having rights rather than acually using them to achieve any goal. How ironic and insightful.

     

    Back to the book:readingtwo:


  10. I'll throw this question out there? (Posted it in a small discussion of Seeing by Saramago as well)

     

    What do you think about Saramago's use of the word "we"? He has this uncanny ability to throw that word into a sentence where it's grammatically incorrect and nonsensical and yet it works beautifully and serves to make the story more intimate. When I read Saramago it's like I'm sitting in dark room with him watching the story unfold and there he is saying "Ooohh now watch this part, this is important because later...."


  11. :) I've also got all the Nabokov's....but have only read about half so far. :dunno::motz:

     

    You and I are the same. This need to have a "complete" set of whatever. I mean they just look so much better on the shelf that way.:D

     

    Sophia what do you think about Saramago's use of the word "we"? He has his uncanny ability to throw that word into a sentence where it's grammatically incorrect and nonsensical and yet it works beautifully and serves to make the story more intimate. When I read Saramago it's like I'm sitting in dark room with him watching the story unfold and there he is saying "Ooohh now watch this part, this is important because later...."


  12. No. These are independant books.

     

    Pontalba you aren't considering reading some Saramago are you? :dunno::motz::):D:smile2:

     

     

    OOOHHHHH I hope so. The Double is my favorite but I also loved All the Names...... okay I've really loved them all.

     

    I've got the day off tomorrow so I'm hoping to get a good chunk of Seeing read. I'll post more.


  13. Sorry it's been going a little slow, not because of the book, I've just had a few issues here at the hospital that have been consuming me.

     

    I have started though and it's definitely classic Saramago and a very interesting concept. I'm impressed with the level of tension he has managed to muster within just the first 23 pages. It's got a "wildfire" feel to it and I can just feel martial law comming already.

     

    Funny the more Saramgo I read the shorter his sentences seem. It's a kind of immunity or accommodation that I believe he is trying to achieve. Adds to the immersive quality of his works IMHO.

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