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    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
Milo MInderbinder

Looking for Writers Like Cormac McCarthy

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I'm on my seventh CM novel at the moment but there aren't many left to go at. I love McCarthy's writing and I would appreciate it if anybody could point me in the direction of authors of a similar style and quality.

 

Thanks in advance! M

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Hi Aruki

 

The main attraction for me is the landscapes he paints with words. I have said it before on here about him but with his vivid descriptive narratives he puts the reader IN the book. I love writers who make every sentence count but McCarthy makes every word count. His stories are mainly set in the Southern states of the U.S. and cover the good the bad and the ugly of human nature. I loved The Road but it was a big departure from his usual themes. At the moment I'm reading CM's Blood Meridian and its one of the most poetic novels I have ever read.

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I love the literature map - it has caused my wishlist to expand considerably in the past!

 

Another fan of Cormac McCarthy here - although I've only read two of his books: The Road, and No Country For Old Men. I find his writing very clean and spare (hope that makes sense - I know what I'm trying to say), and like Milo says, he makes every word count. Having said that I lent The Road to three colleagues and NOT ONE of them liked it!!!

 

The film adaptation of No Country... is well worth seeing as well. They made a really good job of it.

 

As for writers like Cormac McCarthy - I'm tempted to say Annie Proulx. She writes beautifully too.

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okay then, have a go at The Life and Times of Michael K by Coetzee. In my opinion, Coetzee will make McCarthy seem unnecessarily verbose.

 

Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton: probably the most beautifully written novel most people have never read.

 

The Waves by Virginia Woolf is about as sublime as you can get when it comes to painting with words. Before I'd read it, I wouldn't have believed prose of this kind was possible.

 

That should keep you busy.

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okay then, have a go at The Life and Times of Michael K by Coetzee. In my opinion, Coetzee will make McCarthy seem unnecessarily verbose.

 

Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton: probably the most beautifully written novel most people have never read.

 

The Waves by Virginia Woolf is about as sublime as you can get when it comes to painting with words. Before I'd read it, I wouldn't have believed prose of this kind was possible.

 

That should keep you busy.

 

Thanks Aruki. I shall have a look at those. Thanks for posting them.

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