Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     

Recommended Posts

I am of no use there muggle not. I thought like Raven and considered that maybe he was a Took. :blush2:

 

It's not Bilbo himself is it? All that Elvish / Ring magic keeping him clipping along?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am of no use there muggle not. I thought like Raven and considered that maybe he was a Took. :blush2:

 

It's not Bilbo himself is it? All that Elvish / Ring magic keeping him clipping along?

Ok, it was Gollum (Smeagol) who was the oldest. You were correct on the magic of the ring, but it was gollum whose life was extended.

However, Bilbo Baggins was 131 years old when he left and sailed away across the sea and it is unknown whether he still lives.

 

Poppy - btw, since you just recently read The Hobbit, how did you like the book.

Edited by muggle not

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's clever muggle-not!

I'd forgotten that Smeagol was originally a hobbit too!

When I saw your question, like Chrissy, I too thought it of Bilbo Baggins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's clever muggle-not!

I'd forgotten that Smeagol was originally a hobbit too!

When I saw your question, like Chrissy, I too thought it of Bilbo Baggins.

 

Bree, and it may well be Bilbo Baggins who was/is the oldest as his death has yet to be confirmed. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bree, and it may well be Bilbo Baggins who was/is the oldest as his death has yet to be confirmed. :)

There you go, dazzling me with your cleverness again.

You are, of course right!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poppy - btw, since you just recently read The Hobbit, how did you like the book.

 

Really enjoyed it Muggles. Became very fond of Bilbo Baggins and his liking for home comforts and good food. :D

Edited by poppy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never really viewed Smeagol/Gollum as an actual Hobbit, because I thought there was a reference in LotR where Tolkien says they are distant relations of "modern" Hobbits and not actual Hobbits themselves. Wikipedia seems to disagree with my memory on this, however!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never really viewed Smeagol/Gollum as an actual Hobbit, because I thought there was a reference in LotR where Tolkien says they are distant relations of "modern" Hobbits and not actual Hobbits themselves. Wikipedia seems to disagree with my memory on this, however!

As you stated .....this is from Wikipedia (but who is to say they are 100% correct):

 

Gollum, originally known as Sméagol (or Trahald), was a Stoor, one of the three early hobbit-types.

 

actually though, I would like to think of Bilbo as still living and surpassing Gollum in longevity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quoting Gandalf from The Fellowship of the Rings-

 

Long after, but still very long ago, there lived by the banks of the Great River on the edge of Wilderland a clever-handed and quiet-footed little people. I guess they were of hobbit-kind; akin to the fathers of the fathers of the Stoors, for they loved the River, and often swam in it, or made little boats of reeds. There was among them a family of high repute, for it was large and wealthier than most, and it was ruled by a grandmother of the folk, stern and wise in old lore, such as they had. The most inquisitive and curious-minded of that family was called Sméagol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quoting Gandalf from The Fellowship of the Rings-

 

Long after, but still very long ago, there lived by the banks of the Great River on the edge of Wilderland a clever-handed and quiet-footed little people. I guess they were of hobbit-kind; akin to the fathers of the fathers of the Stoors, for they loved the River, and often swam in it, or made little boats of reeds. There was among them a family of high repute, for it was large and wealthier than most, and it was ruled by a grandmother of the folk, stern and wise in old lore, such as they had. The most inquisitive and curious-minded of that family was called Sméagol.

Bree, your memory is surely "not" like a sieve..... (:) sorry poppy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh no - muggle-not - I didn't quote from memory! :blush2:

I only remembered the book it was mentioned in, and that it was Gandalf who spoke of it - and I looked it up.

(The only thing that can be said of my memory is : "selective")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quoting Gandalf from The Fellowship of the Rings-

 

Long after, but still very long ago, there lived by the banks of the Great River on the edge of Wilderland a clever-handed and quiet-footed little people. I guess they were of hobbit-kind; akin to the fathers of the fathers of the Stoors, for they loved the River, and often swam in it, or made little boats of reeds. There was among them a family of high repute, for it was large and wealthier than most, and it was ruled by a grandmother of the folk, stern and wise in old lore, such as they had. The most inquisitive and curious-minded of that family was called Sméagol.

 

That's the line I remember, but at the time I took "of hobbit-kind" to mean they were like hobbits, but not hobbits.

 

Oh no - muggle-not - I didn't quote from memory! :blush2:

I only remembered the book it was mentioned in, and that it was Gandalf who spoke of it - and I looked it up.

(The only thing that can be said of my memory is : "selective")

 

It helps that the books have an index as well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It helps that the books have an index as well!

 

You'll be saying you like maps next. The world's gone mad :wacko::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did read the index, but I didn't think much of the plot.

 

By the way, you've missed the point of my fantasy novel map hatred! I don't actually mind the maps in Tolkien's books, it's every other fantasy author since Tolkien who has felt compelled to have a map at the beginning of their books - just because they are writing fantasy - that I have a problem with! (There will probably be another map related rant in my Game of Thrones thread shortly!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, you've missed the point of my fantasy novel map hatred! I don't actually mind the maps in Tolkien's books, it's every other fantasy author since Tolkien who has felt compelled to have a map at the beginning of their books - just because they are writing fantasy - that I have a problem with! (There will probably be another map related rant in my Game of Thrones thread shortly!).

 

I actually find the maps quite helpful (well to be perfectly honest VERY helpful) I have a completely useless sense of direction, and they've no sooner left home, followed the river to the south, made a couple of turns hither and thither .....and I'm hopelessly lost. However, I pride myself on my map reading skills, although my husband is quick to dispute this fact since once, well maybe twice, I took us on a rather scenic route. I still feel it was the maps accuracy that was at fault.

So when fantasy books have these great treks all over the place, I rather like to see where we are going (and how we're going to get home again ....I'm a bit like Bilbo and miss my home comforts)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually find the maps quite helpful (well to be perfectly honest VERY helpful) I have a completely useless sense of direction, and they've no sooner left home, followed the river to the south, made a couple of turns hither and thither .....and I'm hopelessly lost. However, I pride myself on my map reading skills, although my husband is quick to dispute this fact since once, well maybe twice, I took us on a rather scenic route. I still feel it was the maps accuracy that was at fault.

So when fantasy books have these great treks all over the place, I rather like to see where we are going (and how we're going to get home again ....I'm a bit like Bilbo and miss my home comforts)

 

I agree. I find myself frequently referring to the maps.

 

btw, there is nothing wrong with a scenic route, I frequently enjoy it. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. I find myself frequently referring to the maps.

 

btw, there is nothing wrong with a scenic route, I frequently enjoy it. :)

 

Trouble with map reading too Muggles? *asks very innocently* :angel_not:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble with map reading too Muggles? *asks very innocently* :angel_not:

Aw shucks, a little unplanned scenic highway never hurt anyone. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble with map reading too Muggles? *asks very innocently* :angel_not:

Aw shucks, a little unplanned scenic highway never hurt anyone. :P

May I join you lost folk?

It's common knowledge now, among family and friends, that when I insist one route is the right one, that is the one that'll get us lost even more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May I join you lost folk?

It's common knowledge now, among family and friends, that when I insist one route is the right one, that is the one that'll get us lost even more.

 

I never mind getting lost when I'm with friends :friends3:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started a re-read of The Hobbit, however, I found it difficult reading the papreback (although I read it the first time with no problem :) )instead, Ii put in a request at the library for the kindle edition and will wait until it is available

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7/10 as well.

 

"Half-way there, but beware the bite of Shelob."

 

 

Had to go and mention a giant frelling spider, didn't they? :hide:  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×