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Coffin Nail

Self Help Books

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I've never read any, but some surely must be helpful? Unless one becomes too self-reliant on them, of course.

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I've merged the two self-help threads.

 

I think people can be quite cynical towards self-help books, but there's a big market for them, which means they sell well, and I don't think they'd sell if they weren't helping people in some way.

 

If they can help people to view things differently/in a better light for even for a short time, I'd say that's a good thing.

 

The only self-help book I can remember reading is Don't Sweat the Small Stuff...and it's All Small Stuff. Everything in it was common sense (and it was quite repetitive, as I recall), but It helped me to put a few things into perspective at the time.

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I think most self-help books fall into two categories - firstly there are the ones that provide factual advice such as how to improve your CV, how to get a job abroad, etc., and there then there are the aspirational ones, more about the psychology (for want of a better word) of how to improve you own being. I've only ever read the first type, and then it was pre-internet, and at the time they were useful, but I would imagine that some of these type of books would be out of date quite quickly now. I can't comment on the other type, as I haven't read any that I can think of, but I've never felt the need to read one.

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I've merged the two self-help threads.

 

I think people can be quite cynical towards self-help books, but there's a big market for them, which means they sell well, and I don't think they'd sell if they weren't helping people in some way.

 

If they can help people to view things differently/in a better light for even for a short time, I'd say that's a good thing.

 

The only self-help book I can remember reading is Don't Sweat the Small Stuff...and it's All Small Stuff. Everything in it was common sense (and it was quite repetitive, as I recall), but It helped me to put a few things into perspective at the time.

 

Thanks,

 

I hadn't seen the first thread before I started mine.

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No book has changed my life. Despite reading lots of helpful and motivational books it is you who has to truly make the change. The books make you feel good for a while and then you sunk back into your regular habits. This won't work. I don't read such books any more.

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I've read a few self help and professional development books and most were very dissapointing but I can recommend two which made a big impact on my life.

 

 

How To Win Friends and Influnce People by Dale Carnegie - we moved around a bit when I was growing up and I ended up being a bit quiet and withdrawn. Thankfully I was recommended this book and it totally changed my social life. Essentially it shows you how to strike up a conversation with anyone and teaches basic negotiation skills. I do a lot presentations in my job now and still use the techniques in the book.

 

 

The Jetstream of Success by Julian Pencilliah - my wife gave me this book last Christmas as I was looking to start a new business. This book teaches you three basic things - how to move on from setbacks, how to spot new opportunities and ways to constantly improve yourself. I have found what it syas to be very practical and have used them in my career and particulrlly love the way its so precise instead of just giving the same "think positively" which most other self-help books tend to do. I also discovered later that the author established and runs his own vc company and so maybe the reason why I find what he says so useful is because its what he has used himself.

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Yes,

 

Self help books can often be just a bunch of common sense frases pilled up in a enough thick paper stack to be called book!

 

Though that is not the case with the following:

 

The Hapinnes Hypotesis - Jonathan Haidt (more scientific/research point of view)

 

The 4 hours work week - Tim Ferris (it sounds like a scam, it seems as a scam many times during the book, but it gives life changing insights!)

 

:readingtwo: 

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Curious thought though has anyone here read Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance? It piqued my interest after knowing that it can improve my rational problem-solving skills so I want to give it a try. What are your thoughts about this book? 

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I read it a few years ago and I didn't get on with it particularly well, I thought it was ok but nothing more. Why not give it 50 pages and see if you like it?

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Like other things as well, hey will only work if you are prepared to put in the work. There are no quick fixes unfortunately. 

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On 1/3/2019 at 3:16 PM, Brian. said:

I read it a few years ago and I didn't get on with it particularly well, I thought it was ok but nothing more. Why not give it 50 pages and see if you like it?

 

Same here. I assumed I must be missing something as it has been so highly reviewed and recommended. I still have it on my bookshelf to re-read in the hopes that I will 'get it'. :mellow:

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