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      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
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Kell

Brom (aka Gerald Brom)

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Having already managed to infect many members of the forum with Otherworld-itis, I felt it was time to try and introduce another author to the masses in the hopes that many of you will become similarly infected with love of his work.

 

The author in question is Brom (aka Gerald Brom) who is an artist and writer of immense talent.

 

His first illustrated novel was The Plucker, a nightmarish tale with a whimsical element that is stunningly illustrated by the author. Both words and pictures are filled with a dark beauty.

 

The Devil's Rose was his second illustrated novel and was darker and bleaker still, but with Brom's trademark artwork being the perfect accompanyment to the eloqeunt writing.

 

Most recently, Brom has published The Child Thief, his first full-length novel based on Peter Pan but once again looking at the darker side of one of the most beloved children's tales.

SYNOPSES FOR ALL THREE BOOKS (from Amazon):

 

plucker.th.jpg

 

THE PLUCKER

The Plucker is a dark and twisted tale about a Jack-in-the-Box, aptly named Jack, who must fight for the life of his "human boy owner" against an evil force, called the Plucker (because he plucks your eyeballs out and sucks out your life force). One by one the Plucker and his minions, called Foulthings, capture the toys in the boy's room, and carry them off to the bowels of the earth, deep beneath the boy's house. There the toys are tortured and have their mojo extracted. The toy's mojo comes from the boy's love and his belief that the toys are real, so as the Plucker sucks up all the toys's mojo, he begins to take over the boy's body. Only Jack can save the boy, with the help of the boy's nanny, Mabelle, who practices the dark arts. Spine-tingling and creepy, the story is for all ages, but especially for those in love with graphic novels, fantasy, and sci-fi.

 

devilsrose.th.jpg[/url]

 

THE DEVIL'S ROSE

From the creator of "Plucker" comes another illustrated novel, set in Texas and hell. Escapees from hell fill the pages of this book, terrifying and slaying the living as they try to flee their guards from the underworld. Cole, one of the undead, has been sent to reclaim these souls in flight and return them to the fiery depths. But one escaped soul is not like the others: Rath. He in fact wants to return to hell. But why? And why does Cole, a tormented soul from hell strive to capture his fellow mates? It has to do with a woman named Rose, who he did wrong and a pact he made with the devil.

 

childthief.th.jpg

 

THE CHILD THIEF

In the vein of Gregory Maguire's bestselling works, the award-winning artist Brom takes us on a haunting look at the true world of Peter Pan, in his first full-length novel. From modern day New York to the dying land of Faerie, "The Child Thief" reveals the world of Peter Pan through the eyes of an insecure runaway who is seduced by Peter's charm. But any dreams of a fairy wonderland are quickly replaced by the reality of life and death survival as Peter's recruits are forced into a lethal battle in which the line between good and evil is blurred.

 

 

 

 

As someone who isn't really into graphic novels, I was so surprised to find myself a major fan of a graphic artist and his illustrated novels - believe me, there's such beauty to the pictures that anyone, even those who don't "do" graphic or illustrated novels, will love to look at them.

 

I've read both The Plucker and The Devil's Rose and rated both of them 10/10. I'm part way through reading The Child Thief and if it continues to be as good as it has been so far, it will surely be another 10/10! I don't think I've ever before come across someone who has such as way with both images AND words.

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Having been totally infected with Otherworld-itis (one of my favourite series'), I had no hesitation on checking out this thread :).

 

Brom's website looks good and his artwork is fab.I do already have The Devil's Rose on my wishlish after reading a review from Weave, but I'm definately adding the other two as well on your recommendation. Do they need to be read in order? I also think that this may be something my teenage son would like.

 

Thanks for this Kell :) (No antibiotics required!)

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Oooh. These look Gaiman-y in concept (always a good thing :)) plus this guy actually does his own artwork - man do I envy the man's talent - so I think I have no choice but to seek his books out. The Child Thief looks particularly brilliant so I'll hunt that one down first. Thank you Kell!

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Thanks again Kell for showing me the path to Brom :)

 

Brom is nothing short of brilliant, his words and illustrations are excellent, dark but beautiful at the same time.

 

I enjoyed 'The Plucker', I loved the ideas of toys having their own existence (when I was a kid, I always thought my toys came alive at night, so I was nice to them all and played with them equally ~ yeah I was a weird kid), so 'The Plucker' was familiar to me plus a great dose of the good guys beating the bad guys.

 

As much as I enjoyed 'The Plucker', I enjoyed 'The Devil's Rose' more, I enjoyed Cole's story, the predicament he finds himself in and his search for his Rose, it was a dark tale but lovely at the same time.

 

There is also various themes throughout his books, feelings of loneliness, fear, etc but at the same time there is over~powering feeling of the good will always win out, and your view of what exactly is 'good' (if that makes sense) is questioned.

 

People, people, read some Brom today!

 

PAngel.jpg

^Angel from 'The Plucker', she is such a poor wee soul :)

 

:lol:

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Do they need to be read in order? I also think that this may be something my teenage son would like.

No, they are all completely stand alone and completely different. I wouldn't recommend for yougner teens as there is some *ahem* "bad" language in them that parents may prefer not to hear their kids repeating, but older teens and adults alike will love them. As for The Plucker and The Child Thief, they may be based around toys and a childrens' story repectively, but they are most definitely NOT aimed at or suitable for children. Strictly for the grown-ups. :)

 

... I enjoyed 'The Plucker', I loved the ideas of toys having their own existence (when I was a kid, I always thought my toys came alive at night, so I was nice to them all and played with them equally ~ yeah I was a weird kid)...

I was that kid too - LOL!

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Count me in! The Child Thief sounds like my kind of book so I'll head into Waterstone's asap :roll: I also agree with Bookjumper in that they have something very Neil Gaiman about them. I love Mr Gaiman so hopefully these will be just as good :D Thanks Kell!

 

Edit: The strangest thing has just happened! I thought I'd check out The Child Thief on Amazon before popping to Waterstones and the books have just popped up on the home page.....how bizarre! It's like the world wide web also wants me to have these books :D

Edited by Nicola

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No, they are all completely stand alone and completely different. I wouldn't recommend for yougner teens as there is some *ahem* "bad" language in them that parents may prefer not to hear their kids repeating, but older teens and adults alike will love them. As for The Plucker and The Child Thief, they may be based around toys and a childrens' story repectively, but they are most definitely NOT aimed at or suitable for children. Strictly for the grown-ups. :lol:

 

Oh my son's almost 17, so I'm pretty sure he has uttered words and seen stuff that I don't want to know about! :roll: He's also addicted to World Of Warcraft, for which I read that Brom did some illustrations. Now that is bound to put him on my son's cool radar and earn me some coolness points into the bargain! :D

 

Thanks :(

 

Edit: The strangest thing has just happened! I thought I'd check out The Child Thief on Amazon before popping to Waterstones and the books have just popped up on the home page.....how bizarre! It's like the world wide web also wants me to have these books :D

 

It does! It does! :D

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I want The Child Thief.

 

Now.

 

NOW!! :roll:

 

Thanks Kell, I'm gonna grab that as soon as I can, and possibly the other two at a later stage. Given my love of "The Book Of Lost Things", you can imagine how much the sound of The Child Thief appleals to me :D

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I've also decided to go with The Child Thief.

 

A question: Kell, you mentioned that The Child Thief is Brom's first full-length novel, but it's still a graphic novel, right?

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A question: Kell, you mentioned that The Child Thief is Brom's first full-length novel, but it's still a graphic novel, right?

No, it's not a graphic novel, but it does contain some pictures byh Brom - not the same amount of artwork that's in the other two books (they have it on every single page), but perhaps a picture per chapter or so. All have been in black and white so far (I'm still reading it) and all are stunningly beautiful. It's definitely more novel than graphci novel.

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they may be based around toys and a childrens' story repectively, but they are most definitely NOT aimed at or suitable for children. Strictly for the grown-ups.
Just noticed this - Kell, before I part with any cash, is this just because of language and themes, or are there some naughty bits in there as well :roll:?

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Oh my son's almost 17, so I'm pretty sure he has uttered words and seen stuff that I don't want to know about! :roll: He's also addicted to World Of Warcraft, for which I read that Brom did some illustrations. Now that is bound to put him on my son's cool radar and earn me some coolness points into the bargain! :D

THen, by all accounts he's going to LOVE these books! You will definitely be given the "Cool Mom" moniker if you got him those, although he'll probably get miffed when you pinch them back off him for a read - LOL!

 

Just noticed this - Kell, before I part with any cash, is this just because of language and themes, or are there some naughty bits in there as well :D?

More language than anything else. There's no sex in The Plucker. :lol: And it's only a few choice words - not expletives every other word, so it's not overtly "bad language".

 

Edit: The strangest thing has just happened! I thought I'd check out The Child Thief on Amazon before popping to Waterstones and the books have just popped up on the home page.....how bizarre! It's like the world wide web also wants me to have these books :D

 

Nicola that be Kell she propalry sent the page to come up with that book:tong:

Aha! You have spotted my magical Amazon-Influence powers - LOL!

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No, it's not a graphic novel, but it does contain some pictures byh Brom - not the same amount of artwork that's in the other two books (they have it on every single page), but perhaps a picture per chapter or so. All have been in black and white so far (I'm still reading it) and all are stunningly beautiful. It's definitely more novel than graphci novel.

 

I thought as much, thanks! Now I'm really torn: do I go with the slightly more interesting sounding story with less artwork, or an actual graphic novel? Any tips, Kell?

 

Aha! You have spotted my magical Amazon-Influence powers - LOL!

 

Cor! You couldn't do us a bulk discount on Kindles or something, could you? :roll:

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I thought as much, thanks! Now I'm really torn: do I go with the slightly more interesting sounding story with less artwork, or an actual graphic novel? Any tips, Kell?

It really depends on your mood. Have a look at THe Plucker next time you're ni a shop or library that has it, and if you like the look of the pics you see, then definitely take it home with you because the story is actually fantastic too. If you find you love The Plucker, go out and get The Devil's Rose too. However, if you want to be able to sit down and read more than loko at pics, get The Child Thief.

 

 

Cor! You couldn't do us a bulk discount on Kindles or something, could you? :roll:
I wish my powers extended that far... :D

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I'm more into novels so I'm going to start with The Child Thief, and if the author's style catches my interest that will be enough to make me like the graphic novels. :roll:

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It really depends on your mood. Have a look at THe Plucker next time you're ni a shop or library that has it, and if you like the look of the pics you see, then definitely take it home with you because the story is actually fantastic too. If you find you love The Plucker, go out and get The Devil's Rose too. However, if you want to be able to sit down and read more than loko at pics, get The Child Thief.

 

Good idea. I was going to try and order it this week, but I'll try and contain myself until I'm back at work next week and nearer the bookstore that I know sells Brom's works so I can check them out. :roll:

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Or you could have a look at Brom's website - he has some of his artwork (including some from The Plucker) displayed there and you'll be able to get a feel for his art. :roll:

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Okay, scratch what I said. That artwork is insanely awesome. I'm buying all three books. :roll: That is EXACTLY the kind of dark, morbid, and including the gallery art, occasionally perverse art I love. Fantastic stuff.

 

They WILL be my next purchases.

 

ETA: I notice on the website Holly Black praises The Child Thief - she's not much of an author herself, but I love the style of her books (morbid fairytales) so much that I love them irrespective of poor writing. So that's another promising sign.

Edited by Nollaig

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YAY!!!!!! I am SO chuffed with your last post there, Nolly! :roll: If you're impressed by the art on his site then there is no way you can fail to be enamoured of the books. :D

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I had a look at The Child Thief in a bookstore today and it looks quite good, but I ended up ordering The Plucker last week. I'd like something with more artwork just for now (I'm sure I'll end up getting them all :lol:).

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I called into Waterstones to ask about his books and they didn't have any, not even that they could order, except one which seemed to be a general art book. I was rather disappointed :lol:

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Aw, that's no good :lol: I'm surprised they can't order them in as they haven't been around for that long. I've ordered mine from The Book Depository.

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Yeah I'm going to get them online but that's difficult for me as I don't have a credit card or anything.

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Did Waterstone's say WHY they can't order them? It's not like they're out of print or anything as they're none of them more than a few years old and they're freely available from various sources online. You can certainly get them at Waterstone's online so it seems very strange that they can't order them for you at their shop. :lol:

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