Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
Janet

Janet's reading 2010

Recommended Posts

I think we're agreed Janet, this book is brilliant :) My copy was library loaned but I will definitely buy it and put it on my bookcase of favourite books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are indeed agreed! <--- Hey look, poetry and everyfink! :)

 

Mine was a birthday present from my hubby (who worked out how to access my Amazon Wishlist, to my surprise) and the children. It's heading over for my Mum to read next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Poppy. :)

 

I read Buster Fleabags by Rolf Harris this afternoon.

 

Lots of little adventures of Rolf and his beloved dog Buster Fleabags, this book is one of the 'Quick Reads' bought out for World Book Day and is therefore a very short book.

 

I am a Rolf fan (I love his artwork - the BBC programme Rolf on Art back in 2001 is one of my favourite 'non fiction' TV shows) and I would like to know more about the man and this has given a good taster. I must get hold of his autobiography, Can You Tell What It Is Yet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

026-2010-Jun-07-JonathanLivingstonS.jpg

 

Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach

 

The �blurb�

People who make their own rules when they know they�re right� people who get a special pleasure out of doing something well (even if only for themselves)� people who know there�s more to this whole living thing than meets the eye: they�ll be with Jonathan Seagull all the way. Others may simply escape into a delightful adventure about freedom and flight.

 

This book, quite simply, is unique.

 

If only the blurb hadn�t already used the word delightful. This is the exact adjective that I would have used myself to sum up this little, but gorgeously written, novella.

 

Fewer than 100 pages long, and that includes some drawings and photographs of seagulls, this tells the story of Jonathan Seagull, a bird who is determined to learn the art of flying - despite strong objections from his flock, which eventually see him ostracised by the rest of the group.

 

 

But rather than be dejected, Jonathan strives to create perfection in his flying, until eventually he transcends to a higher plane where he is able to help others just like him�

 

 

I didn�t know much about this book before I bought it. I�d added it to my Amazon wishlist a long time ago, but couldn�t remember why! I was lucky enough to come across it for �1 in a charity sale, and I feel sure that I�ll read it again, even though I don�t often re-read books.

 

I think it�s quite an expensive book for the length of it (currently it has an RRP of �6.99) but I�d say definitely get it from a library and read it, just for the sublime writing alone.

 

The paperback is just 93 pages long and is published by Element. The ISBN number is 978-0006490340.

 

9/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to say that I really didn't enjoy this book very much. :lol: In complete contrast to you, it's one that I definitely won't be re-reading and also one that I will probably give away at the next opportunity (which is a rare thing for me to do).

 

I think it's just me though. It's becoming apparent to me that I'm not really into these short, fable-like books. I guess I like my morals to be meatier.

 

I'm glad you enjoyed it at least. :blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished The Quickening Maze by Adam Foulds yesterday - it was good. :D

 

Next up is Incendiary by Chris Cleave. I loved The Other Hand so I hope this is as good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incendiary is a fabulous book, Janet. And if you like it, I'd recommend watching the film too - I gave myself a headache because I cried so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This morning I finished Incendiary by Chris Cleave - thoughts to follow. :blush:

 

I've just started Life's Too Short [Quick Reads] by various contributors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

028-2010-Jun-17-Incendiary.jpg

 

Incendiary by Chris Cleave

 

The �blurb�

You aren�t stupid. You know there�s no such thing as a perfect mother. Plenty of other books will tell you there is, but this one won�t lie to you.

 

I was weak and I cheated and I was punished, but my god I loved my child through all of it. Love means you never break, and it means you�re stronger than the things they do to you. I know this is true because I have been through fire, and I am the proof love survives.

 

I am not a perfect mother but I will tell you the perfect truth, because this is you and me talking. This is my story.

 

Written in the form of a letter to Osama Bin Laden following an attack on the Emirates Stadium, this tells of the downward spiral into despair of the unnamed protagonist after the death of her husband and son in the tragedy. Racked with guilt about her actions at the time of their deaths, she writes an impassioned letter to Osama telling him of her loss and life after the devastating act of violence.

 

Again, like in his later novel The Other Hand, Chris Cleave writes from the female perspective - and he does it so well. The protagonist is believable, and although she shouldn�t be likeable, the reader still manages to feel empathy for her.

 

In spooky irony, this novel was published on the day of the July 2005 London attacks.

 

Of Cleave�s two novels I preferred The Other Hand, but this is an excellent read, and I�m looking forward to seeing what he has in store for us next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

029-2010-Jun-19-LifesTooShortQuickR.jpg

 

Life’s Too Short by Various Contributors

 

The ‘blurb’

A short, sharp shot of laughter and tears.

 

What does it feel like to drive a lorry out of control? What really goes on in a school of unruly children? Could you travel all over the world for work?

 

Whether we love it or hate it, work has a huge impact on our lives and in recent times working life has totally changed. So what is life really like at work today?

 

From builder to baker to social care worker, these writers let us know. Some of their stories might make you laugh and some might make you cry. The one thing they all prove is that you can never be sure what your working day will bring

 

This is the last of the four books that I won in the World Book Day competition to be read.

 

It's set of short accounts of experiences at work written by members of trade unions who won a competition run by unionlearn, which is a government initiative set up in 1998 to fund union-led projects aimed at increasing union capacity in learning and skills.

 

Some of the stories are amusing and some touching. I wasn’t over enamoured with the one about the dead dog though!

 

The books I won were:

 

Life's Too Short by various contributors

The Perfect Murder bu Peter James

Traitors of the Tower by Alison Weir

Buster Fleabags by Rolf Harris

 

Of the four books, this was my least favourite, but it is a good book for the target audience. My favourite was the Rolf Harris one, followed by Alison Weir and then Peter James.

 

Huge thanks again to Kell for organising the competition. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that last year and I found it really heavy going. I was quite disappointed as I thought I was going to love it. I have a stack of Shakespeare on my shelf as well :D Glad you enjoyed it though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aww, that's a shame. :D

 

I use the Cambridge School Shakespeare where possible. It's the original language, but they give you translations of the mostly-unknown-these-days words, which I like.

 

I have Romeo and Juliet, The Comedy of Errors and Twelfth Night on my 'to read' pile - I'm going to try to do them all this year. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think something like that would help. There is a glossary in the back of the ones I've got to be fair. I think part of the problem is that I tend to read in bed before going to sleep, so I'm usually quite tired by then. I am intent on giving both Othello and twelfth night a good stab in the near future. I hope Twelfth night will be a bit lighter and easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really liked Othello, which was my first Shakespeare - I did it a few years ago as a GCSE English mature student.

 

I've just found Hamlet on the bookcase in the hallway - another to add to my 'to do' list!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just found Hamlet on the bookcase in the hallway - another to add to my 'to do' list!

 

i love this book so much! i studyed it at A level and got to see David Tennant in it aswell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Laura - I don't know how I missed your post. I bet that was good. I would have loved to have seen it. :(

 

I finished Bloody Jack: Being an Account of the Curious Adventures of Mary "Jacky" Faber, Ship's Boy by L A Meyer this morning - thoughts to follow.

 

I sat in the garden this afternoon and started I'm Not Scared by Niccol� Ammaniti, which (unsurprisingly) covers Italy in my World Challenge. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a chance to see a production of Hamlet - I don't actually know the story but have it 'to read' - but it's with a modern-sounding setting so I'm not sure...

 

A reworked interpretation of Shakespeare's well known tale of family tragedy and betrayal.

 

Focussing on the journey of an adolescent boy through a minefield of death, drugs and endless mind games, this story resonates with modern audiences whilst retaining the original language.

Hmm... :D

 

I finished I'm Not Scared this morning - for a book purely impulse purchased as it fit my 'World' challenge, it was really good! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm, the version of hamlet i saw was a bit modern, the cast in the modern clothes i.e jeans and things like that but everything else was still the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished The Earth Hums in B Flat by Mari Strachan tonight. One of my favourite reads of 2010 so far! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I finished The Earth Hums in B Flat by Mari Strachan tonight. One of my favourite reads of 2010 so far! :)

 

I'm so pleased you liked it, Janet! It really is a lovely book, isn't it? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really is - it's just gorgeous! It's my choice for our book club (meeting on Monday!) and has lots to discuss in it. I hope the others liked it as much. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×