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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

 

Brief summary from Amazon:

 

Somewhere in contemporary Britain, "the man Jack" uses his razor-sharp knife to murder a family, but the youngest, a toddler, slips away. The boy ends up in a graveyard, where the ghostly inhabitants adopt him to keep him safe. Nobody Owens, so named because he "looks like nobody but himself," grows up among a multigenerational cast of dead and half-dead characters from different historical periods that includes matronly Mistress Owens; ancient Roman Caius Pompeius; an opinionated young witch; a melodramatic hack poet; and Bod's beloved mentor and guardian, Silas, who is neither living nor dead and has secrets of his own. As he grows up, Bod has a series of adventures, both in and out of the graveyard, and the threat of the man Jack who continues to hunt for him is ever present. Bod's love for his graveyard family and vice versa provide the emotional center, amid suspense, spot-on humor, and delightful scene-setting. Gaiman creates a rich, surprising, and sometimes disturbing tale of dreams, ghouls, murderers, trickery, and family.

 

This is my introduction to Gaiman. I really enjoyed the book and the scope of its imagination. (I bet you Gaiman has an interesting tale to tell about himself). A quick fun read, but I would recommend it more for older children (12 and up). I loved the characters, especially Silas ( a serious but loving “undead”). A good story to illustrate the need for children eventually to “ go and explore your life.”

 

I give it an 8/10

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I really want to read this (big Gaiman fan) but am unsure which version to get - the children's and adult's editions are illustrated by entirely different people, and I don't know whose style would suit the story better. Which one did you read, Readwine?

 

May I suggest "Neverwhere" for your next Gaiman fix? By far the favourite amongst the ones I've read. "Stardust" and "Anansi Boys" are also really good.

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I thought this book was quite charming and enjoyable, though i didn't enjoy it anywhere near how much i did with Stardust. He is certainly an original writer with a lot of good ideas, but i don't feel the novel had as much action as it could have done so found myself being a little bored as it plodded along in parts. It shouldn't put you off though as it is a good read. I need to start Neverwhere when i can make space in my reading schedule.

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BJ, I read the version illustrated by Dave McKean. I enjoyed his illustrations as they capture the darkness of the Graveyard. I am not familiar of the other version. No sure if it published in the US.

Thanks for the recommendations. Gaiman will be back on my list soon.

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I got the one illustrated by Chris Riddell and LOVED it. You can see my review HERE.

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I want to read this one. Someone gave me a link to listen to Neil Gaiman reading it online but by speakers aren't very good and I couldn't really hear when I tried to

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I gave it to Charm coz I didn't like it enough to keep it.

 

It's gorgeous, and for the art alone worth having but I'd rather someone who actually enjoyed the story had it instead.

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I really enjoyed it .. I've read it and listened to Neil reading it also .. magical and with a central character that you care about which is key.

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I've just finished this - it took me quite some time though, not because I wasn't enjoying it but just because I've been so busy.

 

Because it took me so long, it felt rather disjointed. I'm still confused as to why

the Jacks of all Trades killed Bod's family - was it because they thought he was the boy from the ancient prophecy. And if that's the reason, how did they know it was Bod?

 

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I have the children's illustrated edition of this book. I thought it was a very imaginative and original story. I saw the adult version at a bookshop recently, but didn't think it would be any different from the one I have... but I'll take a peek next time and perhaps purchase it if I like what I see. :17:

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I listened to the audio book a couple of months ago and I loved it. I liked the fact it was read by neil gaiman himself and the story was good. I like being read to while I work :17:

 

I'll probably buy the book when I see it, just to have it.

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This is my first Neil Gaiman book. I'd been tempted in the past, and seen lots of good reviews of some of his other books, but (and I know this shouldn't influence me) I was put off after watching the episode of Doctor Who he wrote, which I didn't like at all. However, the kindle version came on offer for only £1, so I decided I'd give him a go after all. It was pretty good, I did enjoy it, but it sort of felt like a bunch of ideas for short stories on the same theme that were then organised to so that they could be cobbled together with an overarching narrative to make it into a single book. That sounds more disparaging than I mean it to, but I'm struggling to put into words exactly what I mean. I did like it, but didn't love it. I will, however, give Gaiman another go, based on this introduction into his novels.

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I do love me some Gaiman!

 

The Graveyard Book, classified as a children's novel it may well be, I must own that it is a favourite of mine amongst Gaiman's stories.

 

Last evening I finished reading the The Graveyard Book (again!) to my son. He has a visual impairment and a subsequent severe physical disability which restricts his ability to access Braille to...well...nil, and as my son is a lover of literature books need to be physically read to him.

 

I've lost count how many times, by his urging, I have read this book to my son. He does also have the Graveyard Book in audio form, however, he prefers the interaction that comes from having someone read to him, and the opportunity it allows him to question and discuss points throughout the story.

 

My son has chosen another Gaiman as his next book, American Gods.

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You've just reminded me that I read something about The Graveyard Book at the weekend. A BBC news article (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-17887405) about film adaptations says that Disney have acquired the film rights. What intrigued me was that it says the book is based on The Jungle Book with Bod being based on Mowgli and raised by ghosts instead of wolves. I have to say that never even occurred to me when I was reading it!

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You've just reminded me that I read something about The Graveyard Book at the weekend. A BBC news article (http://www.bbc.co.uk...t-arts-17887405) about film adaptations says that Disney have acquired the film rights. What intrigued me was that it says the book is based on The Jungle Book with Bod being based on Mowgli and raised by ghosts instead of wolves. I have to say that never even occurred to me when I was reading it!

 

Thank you for sharing the link to the article, chesilbeach. An interesting read. I honestly had never associated the one with the other. It does put the story in a new light somewhat.

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I thoroughly enjoyed The Graveyard Book and now I'm looking forward to the film! Nice one ;)

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My son has chosen another Gaiman as his next book, American Gods.

 

Have you read American Gods yourself Parenthesis? I liked it very much but the theme is quite adult. Probably nothing your son cannot handle though.

 

PS when I get to know you better can I call you Brackets?

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Have you read American Gods yourself Parenthesis? I liked it very much but the theme is quite adult. Probably nothing your son cannot handle though.

 

PS when I get to know you better can I call you Brackets?

 

I have indeed, vodkafan. :) I'm a huge fan of Neil Gaiman, and have read most of his work. American Gods slips right into my son's favourite genres; fantasy, mythology, sci-fi etc. The adult theme of the book will not be an issue as my son is 19, and will not grapple with the content.

 

LOL! You may call me brackets, punctuation marks etc...anytime you wish. ;)

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Sorry for just jumping on this thread but I have just bought The Graveyard Book after a reading an author review on here. Can't wait to start reading it but not sure if I have bought the adult or child version, will see when it arrives. Review to follow....

 

Andie P x

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