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John Steinbeck


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#21 thatdifficultfirstnovel

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 08:24 PM

I'm a teacher, and am annoyed that I won't be able to teach OMAM anymore. A good book that the pupils generally always enjoyed.



#22 Athena

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Posted 10 July 2015 - 05:09 AM

Am I missing something, or why won't you be able to teach it anymore?

#23 thatdifficultfirstnovel

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 03:25 PM

It's getting removed from the GCSE curriculum. Bigger focus on writers in England, rather than writers who write in English. Fairly narrow minded choice.

Will teach Jekyll and Hyde and The Sign Of Four starting next year. Neither excites me from a reading or teaching perspective.

I guess it could be taught lower down the school, but the push will naturally be towards books of a similar context/ilk.

Edited by thatdifficultfirstnovel, 11 July 2015 - 03:26 PM.


#24 chaliepud

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 04:07 PM

That is a big shame, my son did OMAM and Animal Farm for his GCSE this year and loved them both. Waiting to hear what he will be doing for his A Level and what my daughter will be doing for her GCSE now. They really need good books with understandable references!

#25 thatdifficultfirstnovel

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 04:15 PM

I like Sign Of Four, but don't think there is enough meat to it. Didn't like Jekyll, but there is meat to it, yet it is much too difficult for many pupils.

Animal Farm is where I'd be looking, since that is still an option I believe.

#26 chaliepud

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 04:25 PM

Charlie did say that Animal Farm appealed much more to the boys than the girls though. Another of the classes did To Kill A Mockingbird which went down well I think.

#27 bobblybear

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Posted 12 July 2015 - 07:02 AM

I read The Grapes of Wrath last year (or maybe the year before) and thought it was very powerful. The struggle of the Joads (and others) is just heart-breaking.

 

I have also read Of Mice and Men (many years ago) and The Red Pony (back in school, but don't recall anything). After reading The Grapes of Wrath I kept telling myself to read more Steinbeck, but there are just so many others books that catch my attention instead. :doh:



#28 Athena

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Posted 12 July 2015 - 09:54 AM

It's getting removed from the GCSE curriculum. Bigger focus on writers in England, rather than writers who write in English. Fairly narrow minded choice.

Will teach Jekyll and Hyde and The Sign Of Four starting next year. Neither excites me from a reading or teaching perspective.

I guess it could be taught lower down the school, but the push will naturally be towards books of a similar context/ilk.


Ah I understand now! I'm sorry to hear it :(.

#29 woolf woolf

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Posted 12 July 2015 - 12:40 PM

It's getting removed from the GCSE curriculum. Bigger focus on writers in England, rather than writers who write in English. Fairly narrow minded choice.

 

I would like my local language teachers to have as broad a mind as yours seems to be. I've only read Mia Couto, from non-european portuguese literature, and that by my own account. Hopefully, with Erasmus and the immigration waves these numbers get better. It honestly isn't hard, make it obligatory to learn the local language and english from the beginning and introduce the third a few years ahead; with migrant parents, there would be a lot of children proficient in at least three languages.



#30 thatdifficultfirstnovel

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Posted 12 July 2015 - 02:01 PM

It just confuses me. Surely, English as a subject should focus on writing in the English language, wherever that may come from.



#31 Athena

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Posted 13 July 2015 - 07:13 AM

I would agree. In my English lessons at secondary school, we read both British and American English language books. In my Dutch lessons, in the higher classes, I don't know if we were allowed Belgian authors, I don't think so, but we were allowed to read books of what were at the time part of the Netherlands (for example I read a book by an author who was partly from CuraƧao). In the earlier years of secondary school we were allowed any book as long as it was in Dutch (so even a translated work) and we had a pretty free choice in this, but in the later years you had to pick from a list of literary works allowed for the course. For English we had to pick one book of ourselves and the rest of the books and also poetry, they were all picked by the teachers and everyone read the same book and poems.

#32 Kylie

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 11:05 AM

That's such a shame, welovebooks. :( Luckily I didn't know the ending when I read the book, so it had a huge effect. It's so annoying when a great twist gets ruined by careless people!



#33 catherine_wilson

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 08:49 PM

Of mice and men... such a fabulous book. My favourite character was Curleys wife seen as though she's the only woman in the entire book and she doesn't even have a name! It's such a good book and also gives an insight as to how it was during the great depression from lots of different viewpoints: the landowners, the wives, the itinerant workers etc. Such a powerful book!






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