Dimitra

John Steinbeck

37 posts in this topic

Charlie did say that Animal Farm appealed much more to the boys than the girls though. Another of the classes did To Kill A Mockingbird which went down well I think.

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I read The Grapes of Wrath last year (or maybe the year before) and thought it was very powerful. The struggle of the Joads (and others) is just heart-breaking.

 

I have also read Of Mice and Men (many years ago) and The Red Pony (back in school, but don't recall anything). After reading The Grapes of Wrath I kept telling myself to read more Steinbeck, but there are just so many others books that catch my attention instead. :doh:

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It's getting removed from the GCSE curriculum. Bigger focus on writers in England, rather than writers who write in English. Fairly narrow minded choice.

 

Will teach Jekyll and Hyde and The Sign Of Four starting next year. Neither excites me from a reading or teaching perspective.

 

I guess it could be taught lower down the school, but the push will naturally be towards books of a similar context/ilk.

Ah I understand now! I'm sorry to hear it :(.

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It's getting removed from the GCSE curriculum. Bigger focus on writers in England, rather than writers who write in English. Fairly narrow minded choice.

 

I would like my local language teachers to have as broad a mind as yours seems to be. I've only read Mia Couto, from non-european portuguese literature, and that by my own account. Hopefully, with Erasmus and the immigration waves these numbers get better. It honestly isn't hard, make it obligatory to learn the local language and english from the beginning and introduce the third a few years ahead; with migrant parents, there would be a lot of children proficient in at least three languages.

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It just confuses me. Surely, English as a subject should focus on writing in the English language, wherever that may come from.

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I would agree. In my English lessons at secondary school, we read both British and American English language books. In my Dutch lessons, in the higher classes, I don't know if we were allowed Belgian authors, I don't think so, but we were allowed to read books of what were at the time part of the Netherlands (for example I read a book by an author who was partly from Curaçao). In the earlier years of secondary school we were allowed any book as long as it was in Dutch (so even a translated work) and we had a pretty free choice in this, but in the later years you had to pick from a list of literary works allowed for the course. For English we had to pick one book of ourselves and the rest of the books and also poetry, they were all picked by the teachers and everyone read the same book and poems.

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That's such a shame, welovebooks. :( Luckily I didn't know the ending when I read the book, so it had a huge effect. It's so annoying when a great twist gets ruined by careless people!

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Of mice and men... such a fabulous book. My favourite character was Curleys wife seen as though she's the only woman in the entire book and she doesn't even have a name! It's such a good book and also gives an insight as to how it was during the great depression from lots of different viewpoints: the landowners, the wives, the itinerant workers etc. Such a powerful book!

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Steinbeck has an almost pragmatic way of showing how depressing the world is. (if that makes any sense)

His simplistic style was one of the reasons I was drawn to The Pearl , a simplistic way of illustrating the total breakdown of a man for greed. It was deliciously brutal and straightforward.

 

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On 5/19/2017 at 4:28 AM, Qoajo said:

Steinbeck has an almost pragmatic way of showing how depressing the world is.

 

 

I think that's a perfect way of describing Steinbeck's work. After reading The Grapes of Wrath, I had to sit down and take a breath. The emotions I felt throughout that story were so intense, yet his writing is so simple and the plot is by no means complex.

 

I read The Grapes of Wrath years ago, but it is one of the few books that has stayed with me.

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We had to read The Pearl in class at secondary school.  I found it horribly depressing.  I wonder if I might like it better now, 30 years on.  I've read other Steinbecks which I enjoyed far more, Of Mice and Men, Cannery Row, etc.  He was always a favourite author of my mother's, and I would borrow her copies.  

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We were given The Pearl to read as well, thankfully it wasn't a set book, as the blurb on the back put us all off reading it!

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