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#41 hume

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 03:20 AM

I have the complete works of Shakespere. Apart from his sonnets, Anthony and Cleopatra and The Taming of the Shrew (I saw Ten Things I Hate About You, which is based upon it - I loved it!) I've read all of his plays. All are masterpieces in their own right.

Edited by Kell, 02 February 2009 - 12:39 PM.
Inserted ALL the capitals!


#42 jewell

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 03:24 AM

I've always thought it a bit of a crime the way teachers ruin Shakespeare for the kids they're teaching. If the teacher doesn't love his work, then the enthusiasm isn't instilled in the youngsters. I was fortunate in that I had teachers who adored the Bard and made it exciting for us to experience in the classroom.


I had the same enthusiasm instilled in me by my English teacher, who i have to say has played a hugh part in my interests and studies. He encouraged us to absorb Shakespere and taught us how to work things out for ourselves. I used to work at a high school as a teacher support, and the teachers just told them what each sentence meant and told them to copy it down. How silly! Yes, it took a lot of effort to get them involved in his work and to work things out for themselves. But it was possible. And with more effort on the teachers part, i'm sure it would get easier.

My fav's are Much Ado About Nothing and Taming Of The Shrew. I also love his sonnets.

#43 Suzanne123

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 01:43 PM

The teachers just told them what each sentence meant and told them to copy it down. How silly!



That is what my teachers do-and its why I don't like Hamlet which i'm doing at the moment cause its taught so boringly, which means I will probably fail the exam! :lol: Over the christmas holidays, i'm going to read it again and study it on my own which will hopefully make it more intereasting and I will hopefully learn to like it! :)

#44 Kell

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 04:49 PM

Try and see a good production of it - it can help immensely in getting folks into it properly. :)

#45 Suzanne123

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:04 PM

Id love to see the David Tennant version of Hamlet! But then the whole way through, id be like AHHHH THE DOCTOR and not beable to concentrate on the play! I would love to see a version though if I can :)

#46 jewell

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:24 PM

id be like AHHHH THE DOCTOR and not beable to concentrate on the play! :lol:


It's a shame his other work wasn't well known before he became the Doctor. I think i'd fid it hard o concentrate as well. But i think he's a very good acter. We might both be surprised. :) :lol:

#47 Nollaig

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:29 PM

Patrick Stewart is the best Shakespearean actor I've seen - though thats usually movies. I think he does stage shows too, or did.

I love him primarily because hes Captain Picard, but I think hes superb in Shakespearean dramas and also classic english ones - A Christmas Carol/Canterville Ghost.

#48 jewell

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:30 PM

suzanne123 - Have you seen any other Shakespere fims, etc? I was thinking i you find something you like about shakepere that you found yourself, it might make it a bit easier for you to grasp/enjoy Hamlet. I find sometimes that if i get into the writers frame of mind from one of his/her books, i find their other works easier to manage. Sometimes i even find i enjoy them. Then you may not need your teachers enthusiasm and you can run on your own enthusiasm.

I love patrick stuart too. And i luuurrrvve Star trek!

#49 Suzanne123

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 12:39 AM

For Hamlet, I have seen the Laurence Olivier, Mel Gibson and Kenneth Branagh versions, which has helped me more with the text and given me different interpretations of it :lol: Ok, i'll try that with the writers frame of mind thingy when I re-read Hamlet... thanks! :)

#50 The Library Nook

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 01:07 AM

When at school I read Measure for Measure and Midsummer Nights Dream and really enjoyed them. In the past year I set myself the personal challenge of reading some more Shakespeare but I got as far as getting copies of the major plays from The Book People but so far haven't managed any. 2009 will be my year to change this!

#51 Suzanne123

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 02:52 AM

I really want to read A Midsummers Night Dream :)
Although I have no idea what its about!

#52 jewell

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 09:26 PM

A Midsummer Night's Dream was the first book i studied at school and then i did Macbeth. I wasn't to bothered about either. Both of them are about the havoc created by supernatural creatures. Only ones darker than the other. Give you one guess as to which one!

#53 rach.at.the.disco

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 09:32 PM

Can't say I'm a huge fan of Shakespeare, I find it a bit hard to read. Although I'm currently doing a "Women In Shakespeare" module at uni :roll:.

At high school we studied;
Macbeth
Romeo and Juliet (although I don't think we read it)

At uni we've studied;
King Lear
Macbeth
The Taming Of The Shrew (the only one I read all the way through)
Twelfth Night
Othello
Antony and Cleopatra (we're doing that next week but I haven't read it - yet)

I hope to try and read Romeo and Juliet at somepoint in the future.

#54 The Library Nook

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 12:30 AM

A Midsummer Night's Dream was the first book i studied at school and then i did Macbeth.


Ah I did Macbeth as well, had forgotten that!

#55 Kate

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 12:44 PM

My favourite Shakespeare is King Lear, although I found Twelfth Night hilarious!

#56 supergran71

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 04:54 PM

The memory of ~The Merchant of Venice always stayed with me from school. I found it very exciting and have loved it since.

When I was doing the Open University, I saw a production of Twelfth Night and also Midsummer Night's Dream and enjoyed both.

Also as a school girl, I was taken to see Henry V and Hamlet.

All this has left me with a liking for Shakespeare's work and would take any opportunity to see a live portrayal.

#57 BookJumper

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 09:36 AM

From someone who's besotted enough with the Bard she's doing a whole M.A. in Shakespeare (!!), some favourites and least favourites, with film recommendations where appropriate, just off the top of my head 'cos I need to run off to uni for my Hamlet monograph module:

Favs:

King Lear: as my B.A. professor put it, "so what do we think? bleakest play ever written?" and it is. Combines the best elements of tradegy and history though, the villains are deliciously villainous - prepare for a love/hate relationship with vile Edmund, who gets all the best lines - and the ending is heartbreaking. Don't miss the 1998 RSC version, directed by Trevor Nunn, with Ian McKellen as King Lear, it's magnificent. Personally I found Peter Brook's 1971 b/w "masterpiece" a bit dull and uncommunicative.

Hamlet: We all know this one, so straight to the film reccomendations: if you like dramatic landscapes and "wow" soliloquy delivery, look no further than Laurence Olivier; if you're after every word that was written for that play ever, even though they never appeared in the same version, check out Kenneth Branagh's interesting version; if you want a modern version, with great bits and terrible bits, which will make you think, the 2000 film with Ethan Hawke is for you. Don't bother with Zeffirelli (otherwise a stunning director, do make sure you see his Romeo and Juliet), for he made the mistake of casting Mel Gibson, who speaks "To be or not to be" like he does "Freeeeeeedom" in Braveheart (don't get me wrong, I love Braveheart, just the skill is not transferable).

The Merchant of Venice: Revenge or justice? Religious intolerance: do two wrongs make one right? These the questions at the heart of one of Will's most complex plays - four hundred years on, critics are still divided on whether Shylock is a hero or a villain, how's that for multifaceted? Please go out this instant and borrow, see, acquire the stunning version with Al Pacino as Shylock, plus Jeremy Irons and Ralph Fiennes for good measure.

Least Favs:


The Tempest: I never really "got it"? Felt slightly silly when my classmates where discussing the postcolonial interpretations of the play and I was like, wha? But probably it's me that's slow.

Othello: a really layered, powerful play; with the villain Iago getting some amazing speeches - then why don't I like this? It's too well-written, I think; too realistic in its portayal of jealous domestic violence. It makes me uncomfortable.

#58 book

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:30 PM

Never heard of him...is he the one that does the cookery shows on channel 4?

Only kidding! Personally, I'm not a great fan of the Merchant of Venice or even Romeo and Juliet - at least in respect to the other Shakespeare works I've read. Midsummer Night is definitely my favourite.

Does Shakespeare still have his relevance today though?

#59 chesilbeach

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 06:05 PM

I am far from a Shakespeare expert, but my introduction was at school where we studied The Merchant of Venice which I thoroughly enjoyed, and we actually had a trip to London where we saw a production of The Taming of the Shrew with Timothy Dalton and Vanessa Redgrave.

Probably the best live performance of one of his plays was the Renaissance company production of A Midsummer Night's Dream in the 1990's with an absolutely amazing cast, and a fantastic production.

I've also seen A Comedy of Errors, The Tempest (although I only wanted to see that because I have a soft spot of Richard Briers who was playing Prospero, and he was doing a Q&A session afterwards and I couldn't pass up the opportunity), Hamlet and Love's Labours Lost.

I've enjoyed all the productions I've seen on stage, but I have to admit, I'm not even tempted to go for some of the tragedies, like King Lear or Macbeth.

Some of the film versions I've liked have been Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet, Kenneth Branagh's Love's Labours Lost and Much Ado About Nothing.

#60 BookJumper

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 10:07 PM

I'm not even tempted to go for some of the tragedies, like King Lear or Macbeth


... why is that? (Just plain curious, sorry.)




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