Cabrasopa

Non Fiction

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Me too. I used to read about an even amount when I was a child and young teenager, but nowadays I read more fiction than non-fiction. Last year the ratio was 70% vs. 30%, this year I think I've read more fiction than 70%. I do find non-fiction interesting but it depends on my mood and tiredness.

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Night, Dawn and Day are 3 of my favorite non fiction books written by Elie Wiesel.  And another one of my favorite books is Unbroken by Laura Hilldenbrand about Louis Zamperini, a downed and captured WW2 pilot.   It was no 1 on the NY Times Best Sellers List for 178 weeks and is being made into a movie directed by Angelina Jolie.  I like Non- fiction and learning about people's lives.  I like historical non fiction too, like with Alison Weir, who also writes historical fiction.

Edited by Anna Begins

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I love reading books but I prefer non-fiction books like 'Genius at Work' by Peter Freeth. When I read this book, I found it highly interesting. I got to know lots of interesting things from it which we can apply in our real life. This book gives in-depth information about identifying high performers, selection and recruitment processes.

 

Can I ask if you are in any way affiliated with this book or author? 

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I guess maybe the original question here might have been whether we read more fiction or nonfiction . Nonfiction would definitely win for me. I used to read a lot more fiction, but like reading memoirs ,travel and true crime, and some historical books, so I'd say NF for the most part . ( Or even fiction based on a true story )

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I read both.  I like fiction for relaxing before I go to sleep, and if I need to wait for a doctor or something I always carry a fiction book.  I'm also a huge history fan and have a lot of history books that I read if I get a chance during the day. 

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I have started to read more non-fiction over the past few years. Particularly books around mental health including Psychiatry, Psychology and Anthropology.. More recently I've started to delve into books about Philosophy which I've found have given me a lot to think about and really changed my perspective on a lot of things.

 

I've never read a biography or autobiography though, but I recently bought the Autobiography of Bertrand Russell, so I look forward to seeing how I react to such styles of writing.

 

I also have a sizeable collection of books on writing and publishing

Have you found these books on writing helpful?

Edited by Angury

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I read mainly non fictions - memoirs and history in the main. I can't seem to engage with much fiction - I always have "this isn't real" in my head for some reason.

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I've been reading much more non-fiction than fiction over the last month, and I've actually struggled to pick up fiction at all.  As I've posted elsewhere, I'm currently reading the long list of the 2016 Wainwright Prize for nature and travel writing, and currently have five books left to go, of which I've actually started two at the same time!  I'm reading The Snow Mothstorm by Michael McCarthy and Being A Beast by Charles Foster. :)

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I don't read non-fiction unless I am very interested in the author. Non-fiction books are a nice change from time to time and I have read some great books by Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins or George Orwell but still they are a small part of my reading. I used to read mostly engineering and math books in college so I maybe I could count those years as reading non fiction. 

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I don't read non-fiction unless I am very interested in the author. Non-fiction books are a nice change from time to time and I have read some great books by Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins or George Orwell but still they are a small part of my reading. I used to read mostly engineering and math books in college so I maybe I could count those years as reading non fiction.

What are your thoughts on Hitchens books? I have a collection of his essays which is currently stacked on my bookshelf. I know he is a good speaker and was interested to read his writing and explore more of his ideas.

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What are your thoughts on Hitchens books? I have a collection of his essays which is currently stacked on my bookshelf. I know he is a good speaker and was interested to read his writing and explore more of his ideas.

 

Hitchens is great. If you like his talk then you will like his books. His books are mostly on the same matter as his speeches with exceptions like Mortality and Hitch 22. I sometimes find his takes on religion too edgy and it feels like he's trying too hard but even so, he saves the situation with excellent writing. 

 

While reading his books, I always though of reading in his voice. There is something calculated and assertive in his voice that makes whatever he is saying seem that more important. If you are interested in the man behind the ideas on screen, I highly suggest Hitch 22. His life was so damn full of everything that at some point I thought he was making things up. 

 

I have not read the essays that you mentioned but I hope I will get to them at some point. Maybe read Orwell's essays after. 

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Hitchens work is excellent. He was a fine writer and orator, and a decent mammal. Yet another beloved casualty of ineffable entropy. He is sorely missed.

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I think I read more fiction books because they are easier to read.  But I do like some non fiction thrown in as well at the minute I am reading the Outrun by Amy Liptrot which I have to say is keeping my interest but can only be read a chapter at a time to digest what you have read.

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Occasionally I almost have to. Keeps me grounded and aware of things around me from a medium aside from television.

I used to read a lot of non fiction when I was in school. I found it a lot more fun to conversate based on reality with the intellects of academia. They always seemed to more well read than most. 

 

Currently reading "Let the Trumpets Sound", not a bio exactly but about the life of Martin Luther King.

 

And I was given "The Brothers Bulger" for the holidays and kind of pick that one up while waiting in line for something, or while I am eating and just want to drift into the story for a few minutes.

 

"Let The Trumpets Sound" takes a little more focus so read that when I have hour long spurts of time

 

But I have and enjoyed reading a lot of non fiction

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Occasionally I almost have to. Keeps me grounded and aware of things around me from a medium aside from television.

I used to read a lot of non fiction when I was in school. I found it a lot more fun to conversate based on reality with the intellects of academia. They always seemed to more well read than most. 

 

 

 

One would hope that academics should be well read!

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I usually aim for between 10% and 20% non-fiction each year, and last year, it came in at 14%, so happy with that.  Most of my non-fiction is more travel and memoir, although I do like the odd science or maths book too.  Rarely read history or biography.

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