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      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
dakingavenue

Edward Rutherford

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London by Edward Rutherfurd is the best historical fiction novel I've read.

It's huge - thirteen hundred pages.

It takes you through sixteen centuries of the history of London, from Roman times right through to the developement of the docklands.

It's the story of London but also the story of the British Isles.

Each chapter revolves around a different generation, gradually moving through the ages. The characters are all geneticly related, a direct desent from Roman to present day.

This book should be on the national carriculum, as an history lesson for all British school children.

It might give them some pride in there country. If you like this book, then try Sarum by Rutherfurd, it's a more complete story of the whole of England.

Edited by Kell
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I agree, London is an incredible book, so much detail and very readable. I also read Sarum and The Forest, by Edward Rutherford as well, which were both good too.

London`s the best one though, in my opinion. :smile2:

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I read Sarum quite a while ago, and loved it.

 

I have London sitting amongst my TBR books. I will have to get around to reading it sometime.

 

I hadn't even heard of The Forest - I will have to investigate! :smile2:

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And the Irish ones whose names have escaped me!

Russka is ace too.

 

I tried Russka but couldn`t get into it, I`ll have to try it again sometime.

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Rutherfurd's epic has to be The Rebels of Ireland and The Princes of Ireland. A 2 book epic that was great reading.

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something terrible happened to me, not long ago, about this book. I was in the only english bookshop we have here, which is far from where I live, so I don't happen to be there often; while I was there I came across London. I suddently I fell in love with it. Just a second later I realized I didn't have any money with me. I had to leave it behind and come back to my normal life outside the library. now after a year I recall it reading this post. happy ending: I'll buy it soon on the net :smile2:

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I've read London and Sarum, ages ago, and thoroughly enjoyed them, but Russka stopped me for some reason, I guess I should try again, I will eventually as it's on my shelf. I also have The Forest and the Irish books to be read.

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It happened, finally. As I've written few days ago on Your book activity thread: I finally bought London!!!

I just hope it won't disappoint me...

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Sarum and London have been in my TBR for quite a fews years now, they keep getting moved down the pile. I think it is now time to pull them out and give them a go. Hmmm, now what to read first, Sarum or London .........

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I've only read Sarum - but can recommend it.

 

Ever been to Salisbury SueK? You can visit the old site of Sarum nearby - fascinating! :)

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Hi Chrissy, yes we went last year and loved it. That made me think of reading Sarum as I do love the history surrounding it. But best laid plans and all that ..........:) Will definitely give it a go (after I've read the Count of Monte Cristo - which could take some time :D).

 

why am I giving myself these doorstep challenges........

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I've not heard of London, by Edward Rutherfurd until this thread - what an excellent theme for a book like that. Following the generations through London as the city develops. Great idea. 1300 pages though - wow!

 

 

It was so interesting it didn`t seem that long at all, honest! :) I really enjoyed it and would recommend his books. :)

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I've always been fascinated with London, and I keep picking up this book in the bookstore, but never actually buying it. I think it's time I do. I can add it to The Pile. :)

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I completely forgot about Edward Rutherford. I loved Sarum which I read years ago but have never read London. I think that will have to be my next Door Step challenge! Thanks for the recommendation :)

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This book is unexpectedly great. I say unexpectedly because it has been sitting on my shelf for abnout 2 years, from my days working in a book shop where many of my customers reccommended it to me. Personally I took one look at it and thought it was one of those pieces of historical fiction that was hardgoing and required a fair bit of time and patience to get through. However, I picked it up the other day, after exhausting my reading reserves and was instantly gripped. You certainly care about the characters and want to read on for the purposes of discovering what happens to them through their descendents (it does skip decades). But I have found the beauty of the novel is that is almost like a collection of seqential short stories. If you only have half an hour, you can read about the tears and triumphs of a single life/ family. You can then pick it up the next day and read about the tears and triumphs of that persons grandchild/ great grandchild. It is so unique and epic, but so highly readable!

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I'm so glad I found this topic. I go to used sales and bookstores with a of authors and Rutherford is at the top of the list. I bought Sarum and The Forest, just last month, in an effort to compile all his titles. Still looking for London, the one I really want to read. Thanks to all of you, Sarum just moved to the top of my TBR pile.

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Amazon tried to deliver my copy today but I will have to wait till tomorrow to pick it now. I ordered as soon as I read this thread!

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I started reading it yesterday and so far I like it. Perhaps because I like to read about history topics. You learn something from this book and it has interesting stories.

 

I can't stop reading it now. It's getting more and more interesting, all day I was delaying to read this book, knowing it would be difficult to stop reading. Now I'm sleepy and yet I come online to read and write about this book. :D I should listen to my body and go to sleep now. I wish I could sleep and read at the same time.

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