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sarah1979

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

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It took me years to finish Jane Eyre, I started it at 14 and finished it in my 20s. No it was not on my school book list, a friend recommended it. I liked the beginning but couldn't feel anything for her getting the job as governess and falling for Mr. Rochester. It was whent things turned to this that I put the book down for some years.

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It took me years to finish Jane Eyre, I started it at 14 and finished it in my 20s. No it was not on my school book list, a friend recommended it. I liked the beginning but couldn't feel anything for her getting the job as governess and falling for Mr. Rochester. It was whent things turned to this that I put the book down for some years.

 

I understand what you mean, the beginning was more absorbing. But years?! C'mon!

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This is also one of my all-time favorite books. I loved the fact that Rochester could see past Jane's "plain Jane" exterior. He loved her for who she was, warts and all as they say. I think most every woman would like to have a relationship like this.

Also, regardless of the cost, Jane stayed true to herself and her beliefs. She was very independent and though she wanted nothing more than to stay with Rochester, she went her own way when she discovered he was already married. I liked her old fashioned values and ability to stick with them no matter what.

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Just started this book last night after picking it up about a week ago at clearance at waterstones. ;) Have read only about 50-ish pages, it's been easier than I thought! With some classics I have trouble getting into the characters because they are quite two dimensional and unemotional. However, even if this might be the case here a little, this book so far is well written and I am shooting through the pages faster than I thought. I loved the, what was it, 2006 version of the miniseries, and even before then always wanted to read the Bronte sisters books, but since I am not a big fan of books that have mostly female fans (romance novels, drama), I kind of put it off. I have read somewhere this is the easiest book by them to read, and I can believe it.

 

Might have to grab a notepad to write down some words, I have no idea what they mean.. not plain english words, but words involving things customary to that period, like items of clothing and such. :giggle2:

 

but yeah, loving this book so far.

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I am so glad you are enjoying this, it has to be one of my favourite Classic books and my favourite Bronte book not being a big fan of Wuthering Heights. I love her interaction with Mr Rochester which I am guessing you are not as far as that yet. I can imagine some of the English is a little old fashioned especially when it comes to descriptions of the clothing.

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It's definitely time for me to reread Jane Eyre. I have several copies, the first and favorite being the one an English cousin of my mother's sent to her in 1937. :cool:

 

My favorite line - in the garden, is

"Because," he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you--especially when you are near me, as now: It is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred mies or so of land come broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you,--you'd forget me."

 

/sigh/ :)

Edited by pontalba

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[]

It's definitely time for me to reread Jane Eyre. I have several copies, the first and favorite being the one an English cousin of my mother's sent to her in 1937. :cool:

 

My favorite line - in the garden, is

"Because," he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you--especially when you are near me, as now: It is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred mies or so of land come broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you,--you'd forget me."

 

/sigh/ :)

 

 

I know what you mean I love it when he refers to

His heart as the 'organ of adhesiveness'

 

 

sigh indeed:

Edited by pickle

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I really mean to re-read this at some point, too! It's my favourite, favourite book and I feel like another read would bring out more of it that I never saw before! Great quote, too.

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I had to read Jane Eyre for my English Literature GCE, ( as it was all those years ago ). I did not like it then , I guess because I had to read it.

 

I then tried it again in my twenties and what a difference, I loved every page of it.

 

It's well worth having a second try with the classics, after a suitable break, if you don't make it the first time.

 

I agree that Jane Eyre is probably the easiest Bronte sisters book to read. :readingtwo:

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I really mean to re-read this at some point, too!

I really need to get around to re-reading this again too. It's been many years since I read it; back when I was teenager in fact and I loved it then, so I'd love to re-read it to see if I enjoy it even more now that I'm older and more mature!

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I've just finished re-reading this novel. I've read it twice in the space of a year, and it's even better the second time round. First time around, I was focused more on the storyline, whereas second time around, I was fixated more on the characters; the components of their personalities that made them unique. This is a brilliant class by Brontë, that has been perfectly written and executed. It's a great page-turner, and the writing definitely allows you to empathise with the protagonist. It's by far my favourite classic to-date, and so far, my favourite book off all time. (Of course, I'm a novice in books in comparison to some of you out there...)

 

 

"Because," he said, "I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you--especially when you are near me, as now: It is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred mies or so of land come broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I've a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you,--you'd forget me."

 

That quote is ingenious, and rather touching. There are numerous quotes in the novel that I adore. It'd take another read or a bit of research to refresh my memory of them all. I'm pretty sure this is a quote in the book, though.

 

 

"...all the sunshine I feel is in her presence."

 

 

Fantastic.

Edited by Bunce

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I have some questions I have been pondering in my head lately about two things: Jane Eyre + St. John's relationship, and WWS depiction of Mr. Rochester and his effects on his first wife.

 

Have any of you ever considered that perhaps St. John did love Jane Eyre? But...because he had such religious fervor, and he was so fully aware of her feelings for Mr. Rochester, he used "it's duty not love" to compel her to India as his wife? I think people are so quick to label him as a boring missionary with only one thing in mind... but if we see that J.E too felt quite passionately about duty to God (I.e leaving Rochester and not being his mistress, as well as wanting to go to India as a single young woman regardless of the implications society might have placed upon S.J) and if we see that back religion was always of utmost importance regardless that maybe it was the most comfortable way he could find to bring about his true feelings for her? Especially, when you think how everyone knew how in love he was with ... oh darn I can't recall her name right now, the girl he says he cannot be with because of his love for her, maybe that was his way of caving in to pressure? I mean think back to high school or junior high, it was common to tease someone incessantly about their crushes, even if the crush ended up seeing someone else. To this day, my family will say "Oh! Didn't you have a crush on him when you were in school!" No matter how much time has passed they still remember that crush, so maybe though he had moved on to J.E people still were bringing up his past feelings for another woman and he didn't know how to handle it?

 

Then my second pondering in regards to WWS: if in fact Rochester was the reason his first wife went mad...is this truly who anyone would want the heroine of the novel or anyone for that matter to love and marry? I realize we don't choose who we fall in love with, but to think that a character as strong willed as J.E would fall for someone who, speculatively treated his first wife so poorly that it brought about madness in her? Or is it to assume that after all the passing time Rochester changed, and learned to be a better man? Especially, in the end after the accident occurs, it humbles him so we know then that J.E will be safe being with him?

I realize it's a prequel and it's written by someone completely different, and Bronte never truly says why the first wife was mad, it's just hinted at, if this were the true cause ... I don't know I think I would be a tad upset! To think that J.E would fall for someone of that nature and cruelty!

 

Thoughts?

 

I hope none of this is "spoilery" if it is could someone explain to me how to mark it as such? Thank you! ^_^

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I read this last year. It was one of the first classics I have read for a long time. I really enjoyed it, great characters and good story and as you say Univerze, I also found it much easier and quicker to read than I though I would. I am often put off classics by the idea that they will be a bit of a struggle to get through in places, but this was not like that at all and has made me want to read more classics.

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I have not yet read Jane Eyre but I read Wide Sargasso Sea by chance a couple of years back without realising it was anything to do with JE at all. I thought it was an excellent character study, not boring at all.

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I would say that Jane Eyre is my favourite Classic. Lots of people here seem to also be saying that they are struggling to get into Wuthering Heights. I would encourage anyone to endure the first 2 chapters, which are a bit of a grind (IMHO), put it does pay back the effort! Stick with it!

 

 

Ian

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I read it and enjoyed it (its a definite favourite), I have added 'Wide Sargasso Sea' to my wishlist :) (Thanks Chesil) :D

Edited by Weave

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You're welcome, Weave! Hope you enjoy it :smile2:

 

I will let you know :)

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I have just read Jane Eyre and thoroughly enjoyed it and cannot underestimate the writers talent, but I could not stop getting angry when she turns away from true love (at this point, Jane did not pressume that an happy ever after would come from a call in the night!). Okay, so this classic was from a period of religious doctrine, but the realities for Jane to walk away from her true love after finding he was still married to a redundant madwoman, too much to digest. The harshness she had lived under and the reality to suffer some more and at one point, near death, surely, alittle rebelliousness to survive would of been wiser.

 

Anyway, I plan to read Wuthering heights next, and plan to be more open minded and less sensitive! But what is this I read, below comments say this book is hard going...oh cripes, this might not be such a doddle. But alot safer than registration with match.com where eager fellows wink (and lie) into your email account that I find creepy and surreal when this is reality!!!!

 

I also wonder if anyone will ever read this piece as the last review was in 2009...and they are not going to know how frusting it has been for me when I previously written my piece, when accidently deleting it and then having to restart with less enthuasiasm..but it is done, phew!

 

Bon voyage and thank you ever so.

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I also wonder if anyone will ever read this piece as the last review was in 2009...and they are not going to know how frusting it has been for me when I previously written my piece, when accidently deleting it and then having to restart with less enthuasiasm..but it is done, phew!

 

Bon voyage and thank you ever so.

 

Well I read your review Babooshka! (sorry about the italics it won't unstick for some reason)

 

Here is mine:

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte

 

I enjoyed this book very much. It is worthy of the epithet "classic". Although I knew a little of the story I did not realise there was so much more in it. For instance I didn't know it started off during the main characters childhood. Jane Eyre was a very likeable character, always interesting, never bland. When shown coldness and disdain she learned to rebel and hate; later when shown the example of forgiveness (by her first friend Helen Burns) she learns patience and compassion for others. She grows into a sensible young woman who nevertheless has a wild streak that yearns for freedom. I found the plot meaty and it never flagged for me.

I thought Mr Rochester was a very silly man, also quite selfish and devious. He only ever saw his own wants. In a way he was a large child who had never grown up and faced his responsibilities. I almost laughed at his attempt to "explain" to Jane after his scheme was rumbled that he considered himself free to marry in his own mind . In his self delusion he was almost as mad as his wife.

However, Jane's cousin St John was truly much worse.

Through all her troubles Jane always acted properly and according to her principles. I didn't really understand why she did what she did at the end , she could have done much better for herself but at least it was her own choice. I might mention that I had read Wide Sargasso Sea some years beforehand.

 

Also one thing that I found interesting was that the language had started to change a little more towards the modern when compared to Jane Austen who was writing about 1805.

Edited by Kell

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There you go - I managed to unstick the itallics for you. ;)

 

I'm so glad you enjoyed Jane Eyre - I loved it and agree with you entirely about the characters. I've never read Wide Sargasso Sea, but it's on my extended list of books I intend ot get to at some point in the future. :)

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I'm so glad you enjoyed Jane Eyre - I loved it and agree with you entirely about the characters. I've never read Wide Sargasso Sea, but it's on my extended list of books I intend ot get to at some point in the future. :)

 

It really was a very enjoyable read- they just don't build up characters like that any more in novels where you feel they are so real. Wide Sargasso Sea was clever because it gives a much -needed extra dimension to the mad woman, and on Mr Rochester' s. character flaws.

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Yes that is what is wonderful about Jane, how real she is. Very passionate and honest! But I liked Rochester too. I felt sorry for him and I loved his wit! The conversations between Jane and Rochester are what makes the novel!

 

As to Wuthering Heights equally passionate and haunting! It is just different from Jane Eyre but no less a great read.

Edited by Delilah

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I'm so glad you enjoyed the book. It's one of my very favourites; Jane was a woman very ahead of her time in many ways. I loved Rochester too :)

 

If you like adaptations, I can highly recommend the four part adaptation starring Ruth Wilson as Jane, and Toby Stephens as Rochester.

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