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Haruki Murakami


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#41 chrysalis_stage

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 10:12 PM

I've been talking to some friends and it struck me while this was occurring that Murakami is very much akin to Sushi.

Clean, fresh, fragrant, stimulating, crisp...

Murakami is Sushi for the mind!

:lol:


Thats great way to look Mac and like sushi you either love it or hate it. :lol:

#42 Loopyloo100

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 08:45 PM

I've just borrowed Sputnik Sweetheart from the library and have just finished reading it. I was curious to know what I was missing. I really did enjoy the style of writing and found myself completely immersed and found the part with the ferris wheel to be very strange. I certainly would like to read more and I do fancy Norwegian Wood and South of the Border, West of the Sun.

#43 Maureen

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Posted 10 May 2009 - 08:02 PM

I have just started it as well, and am enjoying the style. His descriptions are awesome. I have found myself reading particular sentences twice or three times, just because they read so good.

#44 Weave

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 02:30 AM

I really enjoyed 'Sputnik Sweetheart' :readingtwo: Haruki Murakami has such a lovely way with words, they just seem to flow and I always feel I am meeting an old friend when I start reading another one of his books :D

#45 pipread

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 06:32 PM

I`ve just finished After Dark, I really enjoyed the writing style and the wonderfully descriptive language.:readingtwo: It`s the first book I`ve read by Haruki Murakami, but I`ll definately be reading more in the future. :D

#46 Alia Idaho

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 07:14 AM

I love Haruki Murakami books. My favorites are Wind Up Bird Chronicles, Dance Dance Dance and Norwegian Wood. Sometimes I feel like I'm reading a series but I guess it's just how Murakami keeps his works tied together while being inventive and creative.

#47 Weave

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 12:28 PM

I am glad to hear you enjoyed 'After Dark' pipread, I loved the collection of characters in the story.

Alia Idaho, 'The Wind Up Bird Chronicle' is my favourite, I loved 'Dance Dance Dance' and still to read Norwegian Wood (but it is on my TBR pile). Have you read 'A Wild Sheep Chase'? :D


#48 Weave

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 02:45 PM

I started reading 'Norwegian Wood' last night ;) (I have the vintage copy).

This is from amazon ~

The novel is split into two volumes and beautifully presented here in a "gold" box containing both the green book and the red book. Young Japanese fans became so obsessed with the work that they would dress entirely in one or other colour denoting which volume they most identified with.


Haruki Murakami's writing is very much open to interpretation, I admit the first book I read, 'Kafka on the shore', left me very perplexed but I enjoyed it, I love his style of writing, he has amazing gift of seeing beauty in the most random of things. It was 'The Wind Up Bird Chronicle' which was a turning point for me, so much went into the story, you shared Toru's journey and some of it was so familiar, if that makes sense?

:icon_eek:

#49 frankie

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 03:02 PM

I've just borrowed Sputnik Sweetheart from the library and have just finished reading it. I was curious to know what I was missing. I really did enjoy the style of writing and found myself completely immersed and found the part with the ferris wheel to be very strange. I certainly would like to read more and I do fancy Norwegian Wood and South of the Border, West of the Sun.


I hear what you're saying Loopyloo, I was also curious to know if I was missing something because there's only 10 pages left and I didn't think Murakami could wrap it all up in that space, making 100% logical sense. I was talking about this in the Book Activity thread and Gyre and chrysalis_stage were kind enough to illuminate Murakami's style to me. It seems there's no actual point to it, you just take it as it is and make your own thoughts on it.

The Ferris Wheel trip was really creepy and yet totally captivating. It was something I've never come across with in a novel before.

After realising what Murakami's style is about (= he leaves things to the readers own interpretation), I appreciate the story much more because I don't now have to make my brain understand it logically, because it's impossible.

I hope this makes sense :icon_eek: I'm definitely going to read his other books as well. For some reason I'm really hoping to read Norwegian Wood, I heard someplace that it was a real hit in its' days.

Edit: I just checked the local library and uni library and there are only two novels by Murakami there, Sputnik Sweetheart and A Wild Sheep Chase, both of which I currently have at my possession. There's also Kafka on the Shore but it's in Finnish and I don't know if I want to read Murakami in Finnish. So I'm going to have to order Murakami's books online at some point if I want to read him ;)

Edited by frankie, 15 July 2009 - 03:11 PM.


#50 Freewheeling Andy

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 04:11 PM

That's really the thing I love most about Murukami.

I love the descriptions, and the mundane lives of mundane people who have weird and wonderful things that happen to them. I love the repeated use of the same cyphers and places. The spaghetti and beer and food and TV and cats that always repeat - in a much more low-key and urban equivalent of Ballards broken sunglasses and empty swimming pools. I love the vaguely cyber-punk/matrix-y stuff that happens, where people get sucked into parallel worlds, but those parallel worlds don't bother with the high-tech stuff, and the attempts at explanation, that make cyberpunk feel astonshingly dated very quickly.

I love all that stuff. But really what grabs me is the lack of explanation, the lack of conclusion. The way it's left to the reader to think, and wonder. The way that narratives don't have clearly defined endings, the way they don't in real life.

I think it's fantastic stuff.

I really must read Hard-Boiled Wonderland.

#51 Weave

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 06:35 PM

That's really the thing I love most about Murukami.

I love the descriptions, and the mundane lives of mundane people who have weird and wonderful things that happen to them. I love the repeated use of the same cyphers and places. The spaghetti and beer and food and TV and cats that always repeat - in a much more low-key and urban equivalent of Ballards broken sunglasses and empty swimming pools. I love the vaguely cyber-punk/matrix-y stuff that happens, where people get sucked into parallel worlds, but those parallel worlds don't bother with the high-tech stuff, and the attempts at explanation, that make cyberpunk feel astonshingly dated very quickly.

I love all that stuff. But really what grabs me is the lack of explanation, the lack of conclusion. The way it's left to the reader to think, and wonder. The way that narratives don't have clearly defined endings, the way they don't in real life.

I think it's fantastic stuff.

I really must read Hard-Boiled Wonderland.


Great stuff Andy, the best thing I find about his books is they always involve a cat in some way, he loves cats :icon_eek:

#52 Kylie

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 02:46 AM

Great post, Andy. You're making it very difficult for me to resist those Murakamis on my bookshelf. Too many books to read!

#53 Loopyloo100

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 07:58 PM

I hear what you're saying Loopyloo, I was also curious to know if I was missing something because there's only 10 pages left and I didn't think Murakami could wrap it all up in that space, making 100% logical sense.


Now I've reread what I wrote I don't think I was clear: what I was meaning was that I wondered what I was missing by not reading Murakami when everyone else seemed to be. :mrgreen:

I think I was expecting it not have a beginning, middle and end as in the conventional sense because of the posts I'd read previously.

I've still not gotten round to reading more as I just have too much to get through at the moment!

#54 frankie

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 09:42 AM

Now I've reread what I wrote I don't think I was clear: what I was meaning was that I wondered what I was missing by not reading Murakami when everyone else seemed to be. :D


Aaaaa! ;) I probably read it all wrong myself. Well it did make sense to me, though from a totally different perspective :mrgreen:

#55 Weave

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 04:40 AM

I find it really difficult (as you may have guessed :lol:) to describe Haruki Murakami, its like, 'yeah I really like him because he is so different' and people ask, 'why different', which results in me saying 'er....'

:lol:

#56 Weave

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 05:19 AM

This is articles about Haruki Murakami's new book titled '1Q84', he is being secretive due to the leaks of 'Kafka on the shore' back in 2002 ~

Click here

The Millions blog ~ click here

:mrgreen:

#57 Kylie

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 05:46 AM

Ooh, interesting links, thanks Gyre. That's an intriguing title for a book. I have no doubt that it will be translated into English at some point, given his popularity in English-speaking countries (I'm surprised the article would even mention it).

#58 bartleby

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 12:33 PM

Thanks for that Gyre. I was wondering when he would follow up with another fiction gem. Looks like there might be a follow-up or -ups to 1Q84 in the making already!

He did release a sort of biog last year centring on his love for running marathons - What I Talk ABout When I Talk About Running. (Note the homage to Ray Carver's 'What We Talk About When We Talk About Love' in that title... but don't get me started on Carver.)
Bart

#59 Weave

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Posted 16 August 2009 - 03:35 PM

I am looking forward to it too, Kylie I was surprised too that they mentioned that in the article because I am sure it is a given that the book will be translated into english :)

Bart, I did not know that 'What I Talk ABout When I Talk About Running' was a homage to Ray Carver, I am not familar with his work, sorry to say. :)

#60 notbryan.ryan

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 03:35 PM

Alongside Milan Kundera, this guy is probably my favourite writer ever.

I find the juxtaposition of the ordinary and the downright bizarre in his writing style fascinating. There really aren't many people who could tackle the kind of oddness that he does and still resonate in a very human way.

I think Kafka On The Shore is probably my favourite of his, closely followed by The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Like many other people, Norwegian Wood was the first book of his I read and it is definately a good, gentle introduction to his work for anyone that hasn't read him before.




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