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      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
Snowflake

Funny books

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Guest Tiresias

In the classics department: Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais, and Don Quixote by Cervantes (currently reading). Ulysses is a very funny book, too, which too few people realize.

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Definitely Bill Bryson.

P.G.Wodehouse and I recently read 'Three Men and a Boat' by Jerome K Jerome which was very funny.

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Poppy, I can't wait to get a hold of PG Wodehouse. I have a feeling he's an author I'm really going to enjoy. I was browsing books the other day and noticed his works are being re-released (the covers looks great), so now looks like an ideal time to be getting into them! I'm going to try and hold off until the post-Christmas book sales though, because if I'm going to get them all, the cost will add up!

 

I also found George Grossmith's Diary of a Nobody to be very funny.

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Please excuse double post.

 

OK, so I couldn't wait until after Christmas. I just went out and bought Thank You, Jeeves. Hopefully this will be the beginning of a beautiful friendship! :lol:

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Oh, I do hope you enjoy it Kylie. Let me know. There is a wonderful TV series made of Jeeves and Wooster, starring Hugh Laurie as Bertie Wooster and Steven Fry as Jeeves. They are absolutely brilliant in these parts - I'm sure you would love it.

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Thanks, Poppy. I've been eyeing off the DVDs recently but I'd like to read some of the books first. Does each episode relate specifically to a certain story?

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P.G.Wodehouse...
Poppy, I can't wait to get a hold of PG Wodehouse...
OK, so I couldn't wait until after Christmas. I just went out and bought Thank You, Jeeves. Hopefully this will be the beginning of a beautiful friendship! :lol:

Yes, definitely PG Wodehouse - the Jeeves and Wooster stories are incredibly funny and SO well written!

 

Thanks, Poppy. I've been eyeing off the DVDs recently but I'd like to read some of the books first. Does each episode relate specifically to a certain story?

Yes, the episodes link directly back to the stories. I think there are some episodes are are loosely based on aspects of several stories and that there are some that are just in the spirit of the stories, but it's an excellent series and I LOVE being able to play "Spot the Story" when I watch it on telly.

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I've been thinking of reading some Jeeves and Wooster books (I wonder where that idea came from! :lol: ). Do they need to be read in order?

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I recently read 'Three Men and a Boat' by Jerome K Jerome which was very funny.

 

Ah yes. I enjoyed that one. It's almost like observational stand-up comedy in a way.

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Catcher in the Rye makes me laugh out loud in places, Confederacy of Dunces is a classic and I recently re-read The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole which is still funny! I've also been recommended a new book called The Sewerside Chronicles - there's a couple of extracts on the website which made me smile - sewersidechronicles.com (or uk?...)

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Sue Townsend's books, namely the Adrian Mole series and the ones where the royal family go and live on a council estate (I can't remember the titles and my books are packed away). I love the Adrian Mole books - great observational comedy and satire. Very funny indeed. Sue Townsend is an unrecognised genius.

 

I would also second Round Ireland With A Fridge.

 

Depending on your humour, you might like Douglas Adams books or Terry Pratchett too. :lol:

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I've been thinking of reading some Jeeves and Wooster books (I wonder where that idea came from! :friends0: ). Do they need to be read in order?

 

I believe each book works as a 'standalone' and they don't necessarily need to be read in order, but perhaps someone who has more experience with Jeeves and Wooster can shed some light on that.

 

How many Adrian Mole books are there? I bought a second-hand copy of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole back at the end of last year, I think. I'm sure I read it when I was younger but I really don't remember much of it. Has it dated at all?

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I believe each book works as a 'standalone' and they don't necessarily need to be read in order, but perhaps someone who has more experience with Jeeves and Wooster can shed some light on that.

 

We probably need to ask sib, our resident Wodehouse expert.

 

I've read a lot of Jeeves and Wooster, I'm sure they weren't in order and it didn't seem to make much difference.

The Blandings series with Lord Emsworth and his prize pig 'The Empress' (another excellent series by Wodehouse) are a bit more in sequence.

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How many Adrian Mole books are there? I bought a second-hand copy of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole back at the end of last year, I think. I'm sure I read it when I was younger but I really don't remember much of it. Has it dated at all?

 

There must be at least 5 or 6 Adrian Mole books... maybe 7. If I get to Amazon before anyone else does I'll come back and post the titles!

 

Some of it has dated, eg references to the Falklands War or to TV programmes/celebrities of the time, but a lot of it is pretty timeless as it deals with the family relationships and characters. I love these books. When all my books are properly arranged and I can actually get to them, I'm going to sit down and re-read them all in order!

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The Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging series are quite funny...

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As has been mentioned, Roddy Doyle's Barrytown Trilogy - laugh out loud funny - as you work through the three books they just seem to get funnier.

 

Bill Bryson - particularly Neither here nor there

 

Nick Hornby - High Fidelity

 

The "Pratt" series of books by David Nobbs

("Pratt of the Argus", "Second from last in the sack race", "The Cucumber man" etc)

 

Most books by David Lodge

 

Stephen Fry - The Hippopotamus; Moab is my washpot

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I've been thinking of reading some Jeeves and Wooster books (I wonder where that idea came from! :smile2: ). Do they need to be read in order?

 

You don

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Thanks sib. :)

 

We had that book (years ago) but I can't find it now. :) I am definitely going to buy one though, so I'll look out for this title. :)

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Captain Underpants, Hiccup Horrendous books, Harry Potter (Fred and George mostly).:)

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Calvin & Hobbes:D

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Dry by Augsten Burroughs. He is the same guy that wrote Running with Scissors. I loved Dry because it was funny, yet serious at the same time. I was not a fan of Running and perhaps I will try it again, but Dry made me laugh so hard.

 

I sort of agree. Dry was a great read and it was funny, but I think it was a lot more sad than Running with Scissors. I laughed but also cried during Dry, but with Running I just laughed - but I laughed all the way home :)

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Hi all,

I know humour is very subjective but can anyone suggest a 'funny' book.

Preferably dark humour, but really any books that have made you giggle.

 

thanks

 

mick

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