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    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
Onion Budgie

Your Book Activity - July 2019

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It's July, and it's HOT!  What's everyone reading this month, between ice baths?

 

I've 60 pages left of Wuthering Heights, and I'm really enjoying it.  Teenage me obviously wasn't in the right mood for Emily Bronte, but present-day me definitely is.  It's melodramatic bedlam, and every single character is foul -- much like our Tory government, in fact.  I'm reading it at arm's length and in small chunks, because it's intense!

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I'm just about finished Dogs of Riga by Henning Mankell.   I'm really enjoying this series.  I'm also watching the TV series which is just as good as the books.  Kenneth Branagh is fantastic as Wallender.

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This evening I will make a start on Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch. I don’t know anything about it really except for the fact the people on this forum seem to really like it. I trust your collective judgement. :P

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Completed Moonwalking with Einstein, by Joshua Foer, the latest read for one of my book groups.  We choose from a list of books provided by Bradford Council for reading groups, and to be honest it's a bit of a mystery why some of them are on the list.  This is one - it's not bad, but given how few non-fiction books are provided, I can't for the life of me see why anybody selected this particular one.  Subject material - yes (an exploration of memory), but otherwise it's just a fairly bog-standard ordinary.  TBH, getting bored with so many of this group's selections (a complete contrast to the other group who have not limited themselves to any list of books). 3/6 stars - an OK read.

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I'm reading Peter V. Brett - Demon Cycle 5: The Core. I remembered I had some short story that take place in this series, so I've temporarily stopped my read of The Core (I'm partway through it) to read these short stories. I read Brayan's Gold yesterday and am maybe 75% through The Great Bazaar. Then I've got Messenger's Legacy to read, and after that I plan to continue with The Core. Since the read-a-thon is this upcoming weekend though I'll not be reading The Core for the read-a-thon but will instead turn to my usual graphic novels & manga etc.

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1 hour ago, Brian. said:

This evening I will make a start on Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch. I don’t know anything about it really except for the fact the people on this forum seem to really like it. I trust your collective judgement. :P

I really hope you like it now! :lol:

 

I'm going to start reading Witch Born by Nicholas Bowling. My sister just finished reading it and gave it to me because she thinks I'll like it too. I'm planning to get some reading done on my kindle for the read-a-thon at the weekend though :) 

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17 hours ago, Hayley said:

I'm going to start reading Witch Born by Nicholas Bowling. My sister just finished reading it and gave it to me because she thinks I'll like it too. I'm planning to get some reading done on my kindle for the read-a-thon at the weekend though :) 

 

I love that your sister recommended a book to you :). It's nice when you have a family member who also likes to read. My sister and I talk about books sometimes too :).

 

I finished the short stories (see my earlier post) and went back to reading The Core. Though since the read-a-thon is coming up, I'll be reading some graphic novels & manga etc, from today to (the end of) Sunday.

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I'm just about to start A Lovely View of Sea by Michael Carson -- it arrived in the post this morning.  If it hadn't arrived, I would have begun reading Good Omens instead.  So that one will be next.  (The excitement about the new TV adaptation of that is infectious!)

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Hello friends, (I don't speak english well) I'm cuban, speak spanish but I like some british books. In these days I´m reading Wuthering Heights and Brave New World. Hey, @onionbudgie have you ever seen Wuthering ... film with Juliette Binoche and Ralph Fiennes, this my favorite film, do you like it?

 

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Hi Luis, and welcome.  No, I've never seen any film adaptation of the book.  I'll be sure to watch it the next time it comes up on TV!  I hope you're enjoying the book as much as the film?

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Just finished The Big Fat Surprise by Nina Teicholz.  It's a detailed examination of the science, or lack of it, behind the low fat-high carbohydrate diet that has been the recommended standard in much of the western world for the past 30-40 years or more.  Have been looking into this a bit more since I received NHS advice on pre-diabetes diet that simply didn't make sense given the causes. Slightly heavy going in places as science gets quite detailed, but readable to the end.  5 stars.

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On 5/7/2019 at 1:23 PM, Onion Budgie said:

Hi Luis, and welcome.  No, I've never seen any film adaptation of the book.  I'll be sure to watch it the next time it comes up on TV!  I hope you're enjoying the book as much as the film?

Hi man. No, I'm not. I'm not sure why, maybe the performance of Juliette Binoche is very convincing or perhaps I sow the film first, althought the book is very "young" yet  (40 pages, I have some books in line, turning them). In the mostly of cases I prefer the book, right now I'm thinking in "The name of the rose" by Umberto Eco. Every day I am surprised of the importance of the books for the civilization, some days ago I watched the film "The reader", do you know it? (based on Bernhard Schlink's book)

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Hi Luis and welcome. :) I found the characters in Wuthering Heights intensely annoying, but I loved The Reader, both the book and film. Have you seen The English Patient with Juliette Binoche and Ralph Fiennes? Excellent film.

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I must admit I didn't like the Fiennes/Binoche version of Wuthering Heights, it did stay faithful to the book but I couldn't handle Juliette speaking with a French accent - nothing against the French or Binoche but WH is so much a "Yorkshire" book that it just didn't work for me!

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Hello Luis. Welcome to the forum. :smile:

 

I recently finished a wonderful re reading of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. I have since moved on to the latest Dan Brown Origin. I enjoy the Dan Brown books as you get a nice few nuggets of interesting thrown in amongst improbable action and characters. Not challenging reading, but certainly escapism. 

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I've not heard of The Reader.  (I'm very bad at keeping up with films!)

 

I'm past the halfway point with A Lovely View of Sea.  There's not much of a plot so far; just a precocious 12-yr-old kid wandering around New Brighton, talking to people.  And there are hundreds of spelling errors and typos.  It evidently wasn't proofread before publishing.  A bit sloppy.

 

I spent a couple of hours this evening reading Heartstopper Volume 2 by Alice Oseman, and it was lovely, fluffy, and wondrous.

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10 hours ago, Onion Budgie said:

I spent a couple of hours this evening reading Heartstopper Volume 2 by Alice Oseman, and it was lovely, fluffy, and wondrous.

 

:D!! I received my copy yesterday but am saving it for a read-a-thon :). Very excited to read it though :exc: . Happy reading!!

 

I'm still reading The Core by Peter V. Brett (book 5 in the Demon Cycle quintet). I should be able to finish it this weekend I think :).

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I am about 40% of the way through Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport.

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As well as reading Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Armin, I have been reading old diaries of my mother, father and grandfather of their travels within New Zealand in the 50's. My parents hitch-hiked round the South Island and worked on various orchards and farms ( several which many years later we ended up living near, which is quite strange.) My grandparents did a trip in an Austin 10 which boiled on steep climbs and most of the roads were loose metal. I would love to retrace the journey my grandparents did sometime and even stay in the places they did, if they still exist.

Edited by poppy

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Poppy, what a wonderful read you must be having, and a lovely idea to retrace the journey. My heart warms just at the thought of hearing about it from you! 

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Just finished A Border Station by Shane Connaughton and making a start on The Distant Echo by Val McDermid.

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On 7/12/2019 at 12:28 PM, poppy said:

As well as reading Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Armin, I have been reading old diaries of my mother, father and grandfather of their travels within New Zealand in the 50's. My parents hitch-hiked round the South Island and worked on various orchards and farms ( several which many years later we ended up living near, which is quite strange.) My grandparents did a trip in an Austin 10 which boiled on steep climbs and most of the roads were loose metal. I would love to retrace the journey my grandparents did sometime and even stay in the places they did, if they still exist.

 

That sounds so special!

 

I finished Demon Cycle 5: The Core by Peter V. Brett. I'm thinking of taking a break from reading for one or two days, after finishing off such a big book.

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On ‎14‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 4:08 AM, Chrissy said:

Poppy, what a wonderful read you must be having, and a lovely idea to retrace the journey. My heart warms just at the thought of hearing about it from you! 

 

20 hours ago, Athena said:

 

That sounds so special!

 

 

It is very special. I'm glad they didn't destroy their old diaries as I intend to do to mine, but then mine are filled with a load of twaddle whereas as theirs are quite factual. :blush:

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