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      April Supporter Giveaway   04/01/2019

        "If you look the right way you can see that the whole world is a garden."   In honour of spring, the April giveaway is a print of this wonderful quote from The Secret Garden (thanks, once again to www.thestorygift.co.uk) along with a Secret Garden tea (Victoria Sponge flavoured!) from the  Literary Tea Company! (You can find them both at their own website theliteraryteacompany.co.uk and at their etsy store www.etsy.com/uk/shop/LiteraryTeaCompany ).   As always, patreon supporters will be entered automatically and if you don't support but want to be included in this month's giveaway you can join the patreon here: www.patreon.com/bookclubforum A winner will be chosen at random on the last day of the month!

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On 04.02.2019 at 3:53 PM, ~Andrea~ said:

I've not read any of his short stories but I I enjoyed the TV series.

 

Always promising myself to watch all the TV series and screen adaptations of the books I've read (Electric dreams, Jonathan Strange and Mr Norell, Gone with the wind, Blade runnner). Still none of them have been watched.:giggle2:

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7th  -From the other side (Bernard Werber).

 

When I was 15 or 16 I really enjoyed the "Angels" and the "Gods" cycles. Really liked his Universe and ideas, but this was so long ago so I've decided to find out if I still love Werber's style.

Well, the answer is clearly "Yes". Although when I was a teenager the books seemed(for my inexperienced mind) to be the essence of wisdom and originality at the same time and now I've just had a good time reading a book about something grim written in a light and humouristic way.

Not that I'd add it to the list of my favorites, but it  amused me for the time.

 

And now I'm finally reading Mort, I've switched back to e-book from paper ones, so need a bit of time to get used to the screen.

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On 2/12/2019 at 3:52 PM, Busy_Bee said:

And now I'm finally reading Mort, I've switched back to e-book from paper ones, so need a bit of time to get used to the screen.

 

I hope you enjoy Mort, I really liked that one :).

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8th - Mort

Well, I did enjoy it! It was fun, easy reading. Waking the desire to immerse into the Pratchett's Discwolrd even more.

 

 

9th - A man called Ove by Frederik Backman

Moving, touching, striking the chord. I liked it immensely. Cannot even count how may times I've felt tears running down my cheeks while reading it. Such a bleak existence that the main charcater leads and still so much space for kindness, friendship and empathy in it (even when he tries to hide from everyone and gives them hell). I'll rememeber this book with a great warmth, because everyone has a bit of Ove or Sonia inside and that's wonderful.

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10th - Outsider by Stephen King

 

That was great. Creepy, tense and gripping. it was a bit darker than I am used to, a little less of the supernatural in it  and focused on the psychological side of the story (characters' behaviour, thoughts, doubts and worries), but I liked it just the same.

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I'm glad you enjoyed this recent Stephen King release! I really should read another book by him some time, maybe later this year.

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11th and 12th are 2 volumes of "Les Misérables" by Victor Hugo.

 

       I've got this habit of watching promos of some TV series or films, find out that there is a book (or couple of them) and decide to watch these things after reading. Guess what, after reading I never actually watch anything. Same with the LM. I saw trailer of the TV series with Lily Collins as Fantine and thought that the time has come to read the book. I did it and never ever shall I say that I regret that I've spent almost whole March on it. it is sooo powerful, beautiful, crawling under my skin, into my consciousness, enriching my understanding of the world, of people and, of course, French revolution.

 

      Besides, where else could I find such entertaining description of the Paris' sewage system? What else could make me think of  people who build, fix or clean them? Not the smallest chapter or detail in the description of the characters' lives seems insighificant. 

 

      The characters are so vivid, so real that I feel as if I've met them the other day on my way from work. Looked into wise and sad eyes of Jean Valjean on the bus stop, took a stroll in silence with Monseigneur Bienvenu, listened to the passionate "ABC" club's discussions in the local pub.

 

This book is in my list of favourites.

 

P.S. Although, I know Cosette represents the chastity, innocence and beauty of the world, but as a character she became the most unnoticeable one, such a pity.

 

P.S. #2 I'll try to find time to watch the film and/or TV series.

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13th   - "Good omens" by Terry Ptatchett and Neil Gaiman.

 

Again, the bits of information I've picked about the upcoming TV series brought me to the book.

Ooooh, it's so delicious! I  find that the passages that make me laugh inwardly or lines that contain such deep, hidden irony or satire (that I need to re-read them several time to fully grasp the idea of it)  are extremely rare and thus precious to me.  And this book is full of such. I liked every bit of it and am looking forward to see the charcters on the screen (love for David Tennant will make sure that I watch it).

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