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vodkafan

Vodkafan's Reading Blog 2018

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I just finished The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope. It was a doorstop! It took me a month to get through mainly because I only read it on the bus to work. I will do a full review soon.

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10 hours ago, vodkafan said:

I just finished The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope. It was a doorstop! It took me a month to get through mainly because I only read it on the bus to work. I will do a full review soon.

 

I'll be particularly interested to read that as I'm thinking of nominating it for my book group (we usually meet monthly, but don't in January to enable us to tackle a bigger book over the Christmas/New Year break).

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3 hours ago, willoyd said:

 

I'll be particularly interested to read that as I'm thinking of nominating it for my book group (we usually meet monthly, but don't in January to enable us to tackle a bigger book over the Christmas/New Year break).

 

You are welcome to my copy if you want one to make notes in etc, as it was just going to be left on the book table at work...

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51 minutes ago, vodkafan said:

 

You are welcome to my copy if you want one to make notes in etc, as it was just going to be left on the book table at work...

 

Thank you - that's really thoughtful - but I've actually got both a cheap paperback copy and a nice hardback already.  Guess which one is the working copy!

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8 hours ago, willoyd said:

 

Thank you - that's really thoughtful - but I've actually got both a cheap paperback copy and a nice hardback already.  Guess which one is the working copy!

 

I am going to review it saturday  and give my opinions on it. I will say here I thought it worth the effort. I couldn't help but see the characters in the book as they were portrayed by the actors in the TV version, all except for Shirley Henderson as Marie Melmotte; her voice in the book seemed much younger.

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5 hours ago, vodkafan said:

 

I couldn't help but see the characters in the book as they were portrayed by the actors in the TV version, all except for Shirley Henderson as Marie Melmotte; her voice in the book seemed much younger.

 

I avoided watching this for that very reason.

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The Way We Live Now                 3/5

Anthony Trollope

 

This huge doorstop took me a whole month to read , mainly because I only read it  on the bus to work and breaktimes. That is actually a good way to read a book like this  because you can digest events and unfamiliar language in small bitesize chunks and retain it.  This is only the second Trollope I have read but I shall most likely read more. It is a stand alone novel and not related to any of his linked series. It is now apparently seen as his masterpiece, so all in all probably the best novel of his to read if you only want to read one!

I don't want to detail the plot but I will say the plot is overall quite simple. You have to remember that back then in 1875, Victorians thought that society was going to the dogs and values meant nothing (just like today!). To quote a line from one of George Gissing's characters : "Everything is sham and rottenness." (In the year of Jubilee).

There are a couple of sub-plots involving minor characters which are interesting in themselves and help to round out the main story. 

 The writing, which is a whole generation on from Jane Austen is fairly modern I would say and will not give any trouble to today's reader who is willing to put in a little effort. The pace is not brisk but on the other hand  it never flagged for me. There was always something going on that I wanted to see the outcome of.  There is not a great deal of description of  the Victorian environment, because Trollope was writing in his own age of contemporary things. The telegraph had been around for decades  and this features but  letters were still important and readers who like epistolary novels will find plenty of these too. 

For me the best thing was the well rounded characters and the authentic language . It is always thrilling to me to read a contemporary Victorian novel because we know the language used is exactly how real people spoke.  "I know a trick worth two of that!"  " I say, draw it mild!" Even the posh characters say the word "ain't"  (which I was forever being told off for as a child!) which has sadly now turned into the wretched "innit" today.

Some of the minor characters are so funny. Georgiana Longstaffe was a particular favourite; she was wonderfully selfish but I could also completely understand her impulses and actions to try to better her lot in the face of circumstances. She reminds me of an increasingly desperate rat trying to escape a maze. 

Thinking back I could have perhaps scored it a bit higher.

Edited by vodkafan

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46 minutes ago, vodkafan said:

The Way We Live Now                 3/5

Anthony Trollope

Thinking back I could have perhaps scored it a bit higher.

 

Interesting review.  Thank you, vodkafan.  I'm even more likely to make it my nomination for the book group now - looks just the sort of thing that would work well as a choice.

 

On your scoring, do you always stick with your first rating, or do you ever change?  Just wondered, as this suggests you don't.  I've been known to go back and change, and I have actually built that in as a default in at least one case: I score out of 6, with 6 being reserved for books that are beyond 'Excellent' and have, for whatever reason, become a 'favourite' (don't have to be great literature, just something that makes it particularly special); A fair number of my sixes, I've initially scored as a 5, and then waited to see what I thought of it long term.  I've also downgraded books when I realise that post-reading, it really hasn't made the impact I thought.  So, just wondered what you do.

Edited by willoyd

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On 5/19/2018 at 3:32 PM, willoyd said:

 

Interesting review.  Thank you, vodkafan.  I'm even more likely to make it my nomination for the book group now - looks just the sort of thing that would work well as a choice.

 

On your scoring, do you always stick with your first rating, or do you ever change?  Just wondered, as this suggests you don't.  I've been known to go back and change, and I have actually built that in as a default in at least one case: I score out of 6, with 6 being reserved for books that are beyond 'Excellent' and have, for whatever reason, become a 'favourite' (don't have to be great literature, just something that makes it particularly special); A fair number of my sixes, I've initially scored as a 5, and then waited to see what I thought of it long term.  I've also downgraded books when I realise that post-reading, it really hasn't made the impact I thought.  So, just wondered what you do.

 

Hi Willoyd, I do go back and change sometimes but I don't really have a policy on it .

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