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Chrissy

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15 hours ago, Chrissy said:

@Athena It makes COMPLETE sense.

 

If I get an urge to re read a certain book there is a part of my brain that will say "Too soon, I remember everything" OR "I remember the story, but not the details - go ahead". This little head voice will decide for me. 

With films (unlike books) you cannot control the stream of input - there is a bombardment of information (story, dialogue, characters, scenes, etc). If I have enjoyed a film enough at first viewing I will go back to it at some stage to try and catch stuff I may have missed.

 

I have found in the past 5 years that my reading ability goes through cycles, and I can get very wobbly. Reading and writing is so fundamental to who I believe myself to be that I have had to become philosophical about this, while also finding ways to manage things - so re reading serves a proper purpose in that regard. 

 

To have to deal with the competing desires/requirements of the autism and ADD must be exhausting, and I am blown away by the compromise you have found - just so brilliant! 

 

Thanks Chrissy :flowers2:.

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39) Time Travelling With A Hamster by Ross Welford

 

The title tickled my reading fancy! I am so delighted that it did, else I may have missed this little gem. 

 

From Amazon

Quote

On Al Chaudhury’s twelfth birthday his beloved Grandpa Byron gives him a letter from Al’s late father. In it Al receives a mission

 

This is a touching and well written story of a young boy attempting to navigate the heart aching waters of parental loss, hope and the eternal questions of what makes us who we are. The characters are beautifully drawn, and the text tugs you along gently through young Al's adventures.

 

A lovely, warm and well balanced novel. 

Edited by Chrissy

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I recently bought this book. Great to hear you enjoyed it :)! I bought it because Amazon kept recommending it to me :P. So it's great to hear of a friend who enjoyed it :).

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40) Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

Karin Slaughter has never shied away from being graphically descriptive when conveying in her books the inhuman way that some people can treat others, but I was not quite prepared for the very visceral and harrowing depictions of violence in this novel.There is no distance created between you and the victims via the usual medical examiner / police officer / witness.  I was actually unable to read the book anywhere near bedtime, and kept to daylight and fully awake reading. 

 

This story of those left behind when the oldest of three sisters disappears is well written. We are many years down the line, and the paths that have been taken both then and now are shown in sympathetic detail. But you cannot relax, as this is a thriller with psychological and heart stopping twist and turns, desperately painful recollections and often a sense of utter hopelessness.

 

It is not a book I could recommend, despite the writing and structure being to Karin Slaughter's usual high standard. It is a hard book to read, and will be difficult to forget. If you have read and enjoyed her previous books, and are thinking of this one, just know that she has descriptively stepped things up a notch with this stand alone novel. It is raw and ragged. You Have Been Warned! 

 

What the blazes do I read now? 

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On 10.7.2017 at 0:43 PM, Chrissy said:

40) Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

...

I was actually unable to read the book anywhere near bedtime, and kept to daylight and fully awake reading. 

 

That's quite telling of the content. And the talent of Karin Slaughter! 

 

On 10.7.2017 at 0:43 PM, Chrissy said:

 

It is not a book I could recommend, despite the writing and structure being to Karin Slaughter's usual high standard. It is a hard book to read, and will be difficult to forget. If you have read and enjoyed her previous books, and are thinking of this one, just know that she has descriptively stepped things up a notch with this stand alone novel. It is raw and ragged. You Have Been Warned! 

 

She's stepped things up a notch? Intrigue!! Despite my vow not to reserve any more books from the library in order to finally get to my TBR, I have now reserved a copy of this :giggle2:

 

On 10.7.2017 at 0:43 PM, Chrissy said:

 

What the blazes do I read now? 

 

Slaughter is a tough act to follow. :unsure:

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52 minutes ago, frankie said:

That's quite telling of the content. And the talent of Karin Slaughter! 

She's stepped things up a notch? Intrigue!! Despite my vow not to reserve any more books from the library in order to finally get to my TBR, I have now reserved a copy of this :giggle2:

 

It is definitely a well written book - but ay curumba! I hope that she has lots of fluffy kittens around, and lots of ornamental unicorns on her shelves to counter the darkness! 

 

Quote

Slaughter is a tough act to follow. :unsure:

 

I hope you are referring to the author with this statement! :o if not.....nice Frankie....good Frankie.......:flowers2:

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2 minutes ago, Chrissy said:

 

It is definitely a well written book - but ay curumba! I hope that she has lots of fluffy kittens around, and lots of ornamental unicorns on her shelves to counter the darkness! 

 

It might be interesting to be her live-in partner.... :ph34r::D 

 

2 minutes ago, Chrissy said:

 

I hope you are referring to the author with this statement! :o if not.....nice Frankie....good Frankie.......:flowers2:

 

Wow, I didn't even realize you could read it another way :D But no, I'm not going to compete!! 

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I'm intrigued by the Slaughter novel - never read anything by her, and I like quite dark books.

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10 hours ago, Nollaig said:

I'm intrigued by the Slaughter novel - never read anything by her, and I like quite dark books.

 

The violence that takes place in her novels is highly descriptive, but I found this one tougher to stomach. Violence against woman is fairly typical in her books, but this one is so raw and specifically against the women characters, both physically and psychologically, it made me flinch at times.

 

I like Karin Slaughter's writing, and the way the story is structured worked well, and the characters are well drawn. Good, but harrowing stuff. 

 

Edited by Chrissy

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I started to read one of her books, a few years back, on the recommendation of a colleague, but I didn't make it past the first chapter because of the violence.

 

I'm not squeamish, I just felt it was violence/being graphic for the sake of it... 

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On ‎25‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 9:26 PM, frankie said:

 

Slaughter is a tough act to follow. :unsure:

 

On ‎25‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 10:25 PM, Chrissy said:

 

I hope you are referring to the author with this statement! :o if not.....nice Frankie....good Frankie.......:flowers2:

 

Haven't read any of her books so can't comment, but had to giggle at this exchange:giggle2:

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16 hours ago, Raven said:

I started to read one of her books, a few years back, on the recommendation of a colleague, but I didn't make it past the first chapter because of the violence.

 

I'm not squeamish, I just felt it was violence/being graphic for the sake of it... 

 

Some years ago I got a little worried that I could read books with really violent scenes in them, yet still say I enjoyed the book. After a lot of thought I came to understand that if the writing was good, with characters I could like/admire/hope for, and a story that leads from criminal act, through investigation / twists and turns, to finally arrive at a close with a resolution (arrest of or death of the perpetrator), then that is what I was seeking. However heinous the crime, in a s*t awful situation there will always be people who seek to catch/stop the baddie, who will go above and beyond to achieve that. 

 

I know the book I am reading is fiction, while I also know that there is little an author can come up with that hasn't taken place somewhere in the real world. The book is a'safe' representation of a wholly awful world. It's the conclusion, the closure, the resolution that I am looking for when I read them. 

 

 

9 hours ago, poppy said:

Haven't read any of her books so can't comment, but had to giggle at this exchange:giggle2:

 

I know! :D I had an image of Frankie with a bloodied axe slung over her shoulder thinking "Waddu I do now?"  :lol:

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On 29.7.2017 at 2:35 PM, Chrissy said:

I know! :D I had an image of Frankie with a bloodied axe slung over her shoulder thinking "Waddu I do now?"  :lol:

 

:lol: It's kind of scary that she isn't saying 'What did I just do' instead :ph34r:

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On 01/08/2017 at 7:19 PM, frankie said:

 

:lol: It's kind of scary that she isn't saying 'What did I just do' instead :ph34r:

 

No, I believe that if you had reached the decision that an axe murder was necessary, then you would commit yourself 100% to it - none of this wobbly angst! :D 

 

41) Rivers Of London by Ben Aaronovitch

42) Moon Over Soho by Ben Aaronovitch

43) Whispers Underground  by Ben Aaronovitch

44) Broken Homes  by Ben Aaronovitch

45) Foxglove Summer  by Ben Aaronovitch

46) Rivers of London ; Body Work by Ben Aaronovitch, Cartmel, Sullivan, Guerrero (Graphic Novel) 

 

Recently I bought the latest book in the series, (plus the next two graphic novels, Night Witch and Black Mould).  I first read the series in May (page two on this thread) last year, and wondered if I would enjoy them as much this time around. I need not have worried.

 

Such good writing, great plots and characters. Each book tells a really inventive story, while an arc effortlessly stretches across the books. I love London based stories - especially ones that look at London in a quirky way (Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere springs to mind), and Mr Aaronovitch manages to often make his locations another character of sorts  in the books. 

 

I plan on reading the two graphic novels before I move onto the latest by him, The Hanging Tree

 

 

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16 hours ago, Chrissy said:

 

No, I believe that if you had reached the decision that an axe murder was necessary, then you would commit yourself 100% to it - none of this wobbly angst! :D 

 

 

Thank you for having such faith in me! :blush::lol::lol:

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I'm now reading Pretty Girls. It took me a long long time to get into the book, maybe because I've been ill and stressed about stuff. I'm so glad I gave it another go, though. I've now read past

Spoiler

the funeral and the wake that didn't happen and I'm really curious about what's going to happen. What I wanted to write about, though, was when Lydia went to see Paul's grave and she had the urge to pee and thought, what a more appropriate place to pee in/on. :D And then Claire shows up.... :D

 

Good times! 

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I wish you a Happy New Year Chrissy, I hope 2018 will be a great year for you :hug:.

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Have a good one, Chrissy!

 

May all the books you wish to read be all the ones you want too!

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