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#21 julie

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:13 PM

Hi Ingrid

 I bet it would be really rewarding to get emails from your fans . I have never attempted to write a book, but if I were to write one with a character that was a teen, I'd definitely have to go back in time to revisit my teen years and try to remember things that happened during those years .Such a lot of really good memories .

 

 

Thanks for taking time to reply !



#22 Michelle

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:15 PM

The levels of tension and conflict - YA novels are gripping.  Publishers have the impression that teenagers will not persist with a book that is boring them, so while an adult novel can (and often does) get away with pages of exposition, describing the sunlight on a grassy field etc. YA books tend to get on with the action. Not that we don't include beautiful description and literary language, but YA novelists are not self-indulgent with it.  We are trained to pick out the best couple of sentences, the most effective description and lose the rest.  That is one of the reasons I love to both read and write YA, in a way it is harder than writing adult literature because we have only a couple of sentences to convey what an adult novelist might use two pages for, it is more difficult (but more effective) to write concisely than floridly (as anyone writing to a tight word count will attest).

This is a really good point, and one which is important to me. I rarely get a decent length of time for reading, it's always done in short bursts, with interruptions. I've found that I don't particularly want to get caught up in long descriptions etc.. each time I pick up the book, I want to have the story move along.

 

I also see it with my teen daughter - she will happily admit that a book needs to grab her attention at the outset, and keep that attention held. She also doesn't get much time for reading, so she wants that time to count. 



#23 cassandra.rose

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 02:12 PM

Great questions, chesil, and interesting answers, thank you! :)

 

I have a question, but I fear it's not really to do with the YA aspect, but it's more a general question (or a series of related questions) I would love to ask all authors, and now that I have the opportunity, I shall :)

 

 

Are you an avid reader yourself, and if so, have you always been? And what kinds of books do you enjoy reading the most?

 

Also (and this just occurred to me): do any of you have a young adult as a sounding board for your ideas? How much 'help' do you get from young adults themselves when it comes to the whole process of writing a book?

 

I am an avid reader! I read across pretty much all the genres--literary fiction, science fiction, mysteries, fantasy, thrillers... it all depends on what I'm in the mood for.  So I wouldn't say there's one type of books I enjoy reading the most. It's all about what I feel like reading at that particular time. And I've always been like this, too. My mom was a librarian and I used to come home with stacks of books every couple of weeks. It was awesome!

 

I don't have a particularly young adult that I ask for input, but I am a teacher, and I work with both high school students and first year college students. I definitely think that helps me when it comes to writing teenagers.

 

 

Hi All

Very interesting questions and answers  ! 

 

 

Do any of you watch the book reviews done on YouTube ? There are hundreds of them ,and from what I've watched, the majority are about YA books, so that shows how popular that Genre is .

I'm wondering how many of you get fan mail , and if you have your email address in your books so that fans can contact you ?

 

 

How many of you draw on your years as a teen when it comes to writing your books  ?

 

 

Do you guys get any percentages of ages of your readers ? YA is a very popular Genre for adults, too ,so I'm wondering if anyone knows what the percentages are ?

 

 

Thank you in advance for your time .

 

I generally stay away from reviews in general because it gives me anxiety :( But I do think it's wonderful that people are posting YA reviews on Youtube! That's really neat.

 

I have gotten fan mail and it makes my day every time I get some  :smile: And I do list my email address on my website so people can contact me (for any reason, not just fan mail!)

 

I actually don't know much about the percentage of my readers. I feel like most of the people who've contacted me through email or on Twitter tend to be high school or college aged, but that's not really a scientific survey. It's an interesting questions, though. 



#24 dex

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:25 PM

I have a general question.
Why do authors write First Person pov, I've always found them hard to read. I much prefer Third.

#25 Gwenda007

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:01 PM

Hi All

Very interesting questions and answers  ! 

 

 

Do any of you watch the book reviews done on YouTube ? There are hundreds of them ,and from what I've watched, the majority are about YA books, so that shows how popular that Genre is .

I'm wondering how many of you get fan mail , and if you have your email address in your books so that fans can contact you ?

 

 

How many of you draw on your years as a teen when it comes to writing your books  ?

 

 

Do you guys get any percentages of ages of your readers ? YA is a very popular Genre for adults, too ,so I'm wondering if anyone knows what the percentages are ?

 

 

Thank you in advance for your time .

 

I have seen a few review vlogs and think it's incredibly cool they're so popular. Any way people can talk about books is good by me. :-)

 

Getting fan mail or a nice email or an @ on twitter about one of my books never fails to makes my day. I list both a snail mail (po box) address and an email on my site, and am easy to find online generally, so I hear from a fair number of readers. I do not imagine this will ever get old. And, yes, as others have said: my inner teenager is very easy to access; I suspect that's true for all of us.

 

There's no way to know for sure exactly who's reading. I would say that I hear from more adults or just out of high school teens directly than actual teens. But there are exceptions. Bowker did a study a few years back that said 55 percent of YA book buyers are adults (though the YAs buy more YA books overall).



#26 Ingrid Jonach

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 08:03 AM

I have a general question.
Why do authors write First Person pov, I've always found them hard to read. I much prefer Third.

 

Hi!

 

I write in first person, so I am probably well-placed to answer.

 

I have to say I often land in first person after trying third and realizing it just doesn't work for the story.

 

I write YA, which is generally considered a natural fit for writing in first person. My stories tend to be personal journeys, rather than action or adventure, so first person allows me to show the full breadth of the journey by revealing the inner workings of the protagonist's mind. There are ways to achieve this with third person, but I find first person more immediate and therefore more effective for me, at least. My stories also tend to have an element of mystery and I find that telling the story in first person means the reader can only know what the protagonist knows and therefore are forced to undertake the same journey as the main character.

 

I agree that this can create difficulties with the reader in terms of connecting - especially if they are worlds apart from the protagonist.

 

I hope that gives some insight into at least one author's reasons :-)



#27 dex

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 11:35 AM

thank you for answering my question Ingrid.



#28 AlexiaCasale

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 03:56 PM

Re: First person versus third person narratives...

 

It all depends on the story for me. If I want to focus on the contrast between what's going on in  the character's head versus in the story, then first person is the only effective way to do this. Talking in detail about emotions and thoughts in third person is awkward. If, however, I want to focus on what a variety of people are doing and leave the reader to interpret the thoughts and emotions, then third person is best. It all depends where the focus of the story is and what type of subtext I want to play with.

 

 

>>Do any of you watch the book reviews done on YouTube? I'm wondering how many of you get fan mail , and if you have your email address in your books so that fans can contact you?

 

I do my best to stay up to date with what people are saying about my work. Different people have different views on this, but for me being a professional writer means being well-informed. Sometimes reviews - especially on GoodReads - are hard to take, especially when I feel that they're discourteous or unfair... but that's part of being a writer. And I'd hate to miss out of something that could really drive an improvement in my writing.

 

Plus it means that when I do events I can challenge what I see as misconceptions of the book. I never say 'Such and such said X, Y, Z and they're just WRONG because...' but I *can* and do choose to bring up subjects and general lines of interpretation that I'd like to challenge. It's a way of getting my side across without speaking directly to - or even specifically about - a review I have an issue with.

 

Most of all, there's the amazing rush of happiness I get when I read a good review or a positive comment. The negative stuff is well worth putting up with to make sure I don't miss all the wonderful stuff. I've been really lucky in that almost everyone has been polite and generous in their feedback: I'd never want to miss out on all that kindness and goodwill over fear about the odd thing that might upset me. I think this is part and parcel also of having worked in the theatre: that's a real learning curve of understanding that if you're going to do it, you have to listen to what people say - good and bad.

 

 

>>How many of you draw on your years as a teen when it comes to writing your bools?

 

I definitely do... but then I draw on my life in general, and the lives of those around me. But there's so much change when you're a teenager - it's a really rich period of life to work from... and obviously my teen year are my 'way in' to teenage characters.

 

 

>>Do you guys get any percentages of ages of your readers?

 

I don't know where to find this out but I'd love to know more! So far the vast majority of my readers have been adults - mid 20s and up - but I'm starting to get a really wide-ranging readership in terms of ages and that's so exciting.

 

:)



#29 dex

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 05:59 PM

Thanks for answering, AlexiaCasale




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