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      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
frankie

Jogging Diary

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On 18.6.2017 at 6:28 PM, Lau_Lou said:

That is no problem :)

I have got some better running gear too. 

I am going with my dad now. So it's nice to have somebody to do it with.

 

 

Yeah it's nice to have someone to jog with! :)  When I started the first time, I had a friend who was equally unathletic as I was, so we were equally out of shape, and so it was very easy to jog with her, as we had the same slow pace. I once went with another friend who was more fit and he was way too quick for me. 

 

I didn't manage to go on a jog this week as I had long days at work every day this week. By the time I got home I was really hungry and I couldn't then go jogging on a full stomach. I did a bit of dancing, though, to test out the new bra :D  Good stuff.   Hopefully I'll be able to start jogging next week. 

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It is good to be with someone who won't end up running off and leaving you. 

Hope you enjoyed your dancing :) a shame work got in the way. 

 

Went for a run yesterday. The end of our street joins a bypass and we saw three roosters in the woody area. Just hanging out. 

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I'm still not back running regularly. Once I get out of the habit I find it hard to get back into it which is quite frustrating.  Couch to 5k is a great way to start running and its how I got into it years ago.

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6 hours ago, Brian. said:

I'm still not back running regularly. Once I get out of the habit I find it hard to get back into it which is quite frustrating.  Couch to 5k is a great way to start running and its how I got into it years ago.

 

I've had to stop running for a week a few times now because of my knee and it's so frustrating. Luckily, I get into it again easily.

 

Maybe you could plan a 5k race to get back into the habit of running regularly? That's something you can easily manage if you were training for a marathon, so it might provide some motivation?

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On ‎01‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 10:07 PM, Alexander the Great said:

 

I've had to stop running for a week a few times now because of my knee and it's so frustrating. Luckily, I get into it again easily.

 

Maybe you could plan a 5k race to get back into the habit of running regularly? That's something you can easily manage if you were training for a marathon, so it might provide some motivation?

 

I do have an obstacle race at the end of July which is 6KM so that should kick my ass back into gear.

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I started the Couch to 5k -program today and it was easier than I'd anticipated. I hope I stick with the program this time and actually finish it. 

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Did the second jog today, of which I'm very proud, as it was the hottest day this summer and I'd been to the beach with a friend and her son, and was feeling kind of tired after the day (and the outing included a lot of walking!). :cool: At the start of the day, I wasn't at all sure I'd go jogging today! 

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Thanks! :)  I'm still amazed by how well it went :)  Unfortunately I now have a flu and so I can't go jogging :(   I'll have to pick up where I left later. I hope it won't be too long! 

 

I really want to read Murakami's book on running now. 

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On 6-8-2017 at 6:23 PM, frankie said:

Thanks! :)  I'm still amazed by how well it went :)  Unfortunately I now have a flu and so I can't go jogging :(   I'll have to pick up where I left later. I hope it won't be too long! 

 

I really want to read Murakami's book on running now. 

 

Did you manage to pick it back up?

 

I look forward to reading your review. I wonder what it's like, but I have so many books to read (I'm sure you know the feeling!)

 

I've been running 6k, sometimes 7k, for months and months. I want to be better on the 10k, but have been having anxiety that running 8k or 9k or 10k, I won't be able to do it. My time will be bad, I'll not be able to do it in one go. I get so anxious about it, so convinced I'll fail. I hurt myself on my interval last week and was hesitant to do one this weekend (I only do intervals on the weekend, because during the week I run with a club and intervals are a solitary kind of thing). So I made myself do the 8k today - and I did it! My time wasn't very good, but under the hour, which was well enough. I'm hoping I can do more of this!

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I know it can be difficult but don't worry about your time it doesn't really mean much and you will tend to run faster than you should, especially on longer distances. When I first started to run longer distances I used to pick 1 run a week as my long run and increase the distance slightly every week. The general rule is that you shouldn't increase by more than 10% but there is no reason why you can't increase by a smaller percentage. For example, you made yourself do 8K today, next week don't feel the pressure to do 9k, maybe instead do 8.3km and work up to it slowly. Large increases in time or distance is the most common cause of injury. Tendons and ligaments take a lot longer to adapt to training stress than you muscles or cardiovascular system. Your long run should also be at an easy pace, you shouldn't be pushing it.

 

It is also worth doing an easier week every 4-6 weeks to allow your body to recover while still doing some exercise. During my easier weeks I reduce my distance significantly and also lower my pace a lot. As a final word of encouragement, don't beat yourself up about stopping to rest on longer runs. Even the best runners in the world do this when pushing their distances up during training and I definitely stop to catch my breath at times when out running.

 

I hope this helps a little. When I started running more consistently about 5 or 6 years ago I was 20 kilos heavier than I am now and I was incredibly slow. I'm still not that fast and I could definitely stand to lose another 5 kilos but know that you are not alone in what you are feeling at the moment, almost every runner goes through these emotions.

 

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52 minutes ago, Brian. said:

I know it can be difficult but don't worry about your time it doesn't really mean much and you will tend to run faster than you should, especially on longer distances. When I first started to run longer distances I used to pick 1 run a week as my long run and increase the distance slightly every week. The general rule is that you shouldn't increase by more than 10% but there is no reason why you can't increase by a smaller percentage. For example, you made yourself do 8K today, next week don't feel the pressure to do 9k, maybe instead do 8.3km and work up to it slowly. Large increases in time or distance is the most common cause of injury. Tendons and ligaments take a lot longer to adapt to training stress than you muscles or cardiovascular system. Your long run should also be at an easy pace, you shouldn't be pushing it.

 

It is also worth doing an easier week every 4-6 weeks to allow your body to recover while still doing some exercise. During my easier weeks I reduce my distance significantly and also lower my pace a lot. As a final word of encouragement, don't beat yourself up about stopping to rest on longer runs. Even the best runners in the world do this when pushing their distances up during training and I definitely stop to catch my breath at times when out running.

 

I hope this helps a little. When I started running more consistently about 5 or 6 years ago I was 20 kilos heavier than I am now and I was incredibly slow. I'm still not that fast and I could definitely stand to lose another 5 kilos but know that you are not alone in what you are feeling at the moment, almost every runner goes through these emotions.

 

 

This is actually very helpful! A lot of people talk about how your time doesn't matter, but it always does to me. I also tend to increase the distance too drastically. I think increasing with 10% at most will help me to not compare my time as much, because the distances will vary more. And maybe it's wrong, but it's only when someone else who's walked the path I walked says that time doesn't matter, I'll be more likely to accept it.

 

I usually don't feel sore after running, and 8k isn't that much more than the 6k I usually do on Wednesdays in one go, or as interval - but I do feel sore in my neck, shoulder blades and lower back today. 

 

What you say about stopping to catch a breath on longer runs - it's so good to read that. I always feel so bad when I do that, I beat myself up over it, feel like it doesn't count because I stopped. 

 

I'll also do the easier week every 4 to 6 weeks. Your post has been more helpful than anything I've found or read in many many months!

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