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    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     
Michelle

Author Chat - Michele Gorman

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And I can anticipate the next question :-) I chose Jamie because I wanted an androgynous name, and used Scott in reference to the Antarctic explorer, Captain Scott. And the whole name had to be easy to spell and remember.

 

I'd never even thought of that question, to be honest! Having said that - what a interesting explanation for the pen name you chose. :)

 

Another thing I've always wondered is, how many times do you think you read your novel before it's published? Do you re-read your work at the end of every day or the next morning, at the end of every chapter, or every fifth chapter, or do you wait until you've done the first draft and then read through it all in one go? I've sometimes wondered if authors ever read their book as a whole or just read it pages/chapters/sections at a time when re-writing and editing.

 

Thanks again for all your responses, it's genuinely fascinating!

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Hi chesilbeach, that's a good question, and I guess it depends on the book. I've probably read Single in the City 30 times because, as I mentioned, it was edited that many times. I probably read Misfortune Cookie straight through five or six times. I'll read through my current novella twice, once before I give it to my agent and then again after making her suggested edits. In addition to that there are the chapter edits. Using the novella I'm working on at the moment as an example, I've just finished chapter 7 and haven't reread any of the previous chapters. But now, halfway through, I'll do an edit, tightening up the story to the halfway point, before I continue writing. I'll avoid going over individual chapters too many times because doing so makes it harder to see the big picture, and it's as important to edit the broad narrative arch as well as the details in the chapters.

 

I've never read a book through once it's been published though. I dont' think I could enjoy them - I can't see them as entertaiinment, only as works in progress. That's why I love to read Other people's books so much!

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I've got eclectic reading tastes! There are certain authors that I love (John Irving, Isabelle Allende's early books, Margaret Atwood, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Julian Fellowes) and several books that stand out as ones I always recommend - The Cloud Atlas, To Kill a Mockingbird, Gone with the Wind, William Walker's First Year of Marriage (A Horror Story). I'm always partial to biographies or realistic fiction set in the early 20th century, like Doris Lessing's The Grass is Singing, Isak Dinesen's Out of Africa, anything by Nancy Mitford. And of course chick lit, where I prefer funny books, Marian Keyes over Jane Green.

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I'm just popping in here to say that I read Single in the City this week, and am halfway through Misfortune Cookie and although I don't read anywhere near as much chick-lit as I used to, I've really enjoyed both books.  I'll write a full review later on, but thought I'd bump the thread because if you like the chick-lit genre, Michele's books should be right up your street, and you can read this thread to find out a bit more about her and her writing here. :smile2:

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