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Kell

The Modern Classics Challenge

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There are so many books considered "great" and many of them are from the 20th Century (and some from the 21st Century are already being considered modern classics too!). These modern classics cover many different genres and spark a whole range of emotions.

 

So how about it then? Anyone up for the Modern Classics challenge?

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I am well up for it, just let me know what title. :D

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Any title you like - whatever takes your fancy - it's up to you! :D

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That's an interesting idea.

 

I'd wager Modern Classic is much better than an Instant Classic, which might explain my relationship with my Used Car Salesman.

 

If I understand, a Modern Classic might be a popular book from the current era that had an impact on our literary culture.

 

I think the following might be examples -- tell me if I'm on the wrong track.

 

Interview with a Vampire by Anne Rice spawned an entire 'modern' genre of vampire horror/romance/magic books.

 

Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach opened the door for the New Age Novel living on it's own section in the bookstore.

 

Chariots of the Gods? by Erich von D

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Any title you like - whatever takes your fancy - it's up to you! :D

 

Oh I see :D, I will mull this over and get started!;)

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Would Lord of the Flies by William Golding be the sort of thing you mean?>:smile2:
I'd definitely count that as a modern classic. :)

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ooh i like the burgess/kesey classic idea... i guess all the beatnik writers would count in that case. defintely naked lunch by william s. burroughs (needs a few readings to fully appreciate i think) and on the road by jack kerouac. but then again i think its a very personal thing, for example i found memnoch the devil so much more profound than interview with a vampire. so i guess the fame of a book must count, or at leastits status as a cult-classic. is 1984 (george orwell) too prosaic...? :smile2:

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Guest velocipede2288

I would like to enter a few what I would call, modern classics.

Jack Kerouac's Desolation Mountain, The Vanity of Delouz, On the Road, Visions of Cody

Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd.

Anthony Hope's The Prisoner of Zenda.

Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage.Catalina.

Kilvert's Diary.

Thoreau's Walden.

Edited by Michelle
bolding removed

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Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd.

 

Published in 1874 - perhaps a little early for a modern classic?

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Guest velocipede2288
Published in 1874 - perhaps a little early for a modern classic?

 

Point taken.

would also like to add books worthy of reading.

Rider Hagard's "King solomon's Mines. and Alan Quartermain.

Any of C.S. Foresters Hornblower series.

And any, P.G.Woodhouse's Wooster and Jeeves and Blandins Castle series.

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velocipede, I like your suggestion of Somerset Maugham - who appears to be an unfashionable and under-read author now?

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Guest velocipede2288

Here are a few more.

The way of all flesh.Samuel Butler.

To Kill a Mocking Bird. Harper Lee.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.James Joyce.

Sinister Street. Compton Mckensie.

The Cain Multiny. Herman Wouk.

The Razors Edge. Somerst Mougham.

A Farwell to Arms. Ernest Hemingway.

Edited by Michelle
Bolding removed yet again

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