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    • Hayley

      Something Wicked This Way Comes...   10/09/2019

      The Autumn Supporter Giveaway!       Welcome to the very first of the seasonal BCF supporter giveaways! This month also marks one year since I took on the forum, so I want to say an extra huge thank you to all of you for keeping this place going. I have a little bit more to say about that later but, for now, let's get to the giveaway!     The Autumn Giveaway winner will be getting two Penguin Little Black Classics, The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe and To Be Read At Dusk by Charles Dickens. Both of these little books contain three atmospheric short stories, perfect for autumnal evenings. The winner will also get Mary Shelley tea (a lavender and vanilla black tea) from Rosie Lea Tea's Literary Tea Collection (https://www.rosieleatea.co.uk/collections/literary-tea-collection) and a chocolate skull, to really get that spooky atmosphere .   and...   A special treat for a special month. The winner will choose one of the following recent paperback releases from the independent bookshop Big Green Bookshop:       The Wych Elm by Tana French A House of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan Melmoth by Sarah Perry The Familiars by Stacey Halls  The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein by Kiersten White   The winner will be chosen via the usual random selection process in one week. Patreon supporters are entered automatically. If you aren't a patreon supporter but you'd like to join in with this giveaway, you can support here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum.   I really hope you're all going to like this introduction to the seasonal giveaways. It's been a lot of fun to put together. Other chocolate skulls may have been harmed during the selection process…     

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Found 6 results

  1. Would you tell me books of historical fiction which are written in a classical literary style, (or rather quasi-classical style). Though my favorite setting is ancient ages, please tell me every book with such a style. Sincerely.
  2. I’m planning on reading more, trying to improve my intellectual level. But I don’t have all the time of the world. What are some good reads for that purpose? I accept all (non-fiction) genres: economics, politics, religion, history… I have already read “The God Delusion” by Richard Dawkins.
  3. I LOVE George R.R Martin's series of books and am looking for something similar to fill my time whilst I wait for the next one to be released! Fantasy, with a medieval setting perhaps, or in the same sort of time frame - I'm a sucker for kings and queens and courtly goings on so even a good historical setting will sort me out. Thanks!
  4. Hello, I'm brand new on here and seeking some help from any fellow bookworms/avid readers! I'm currently beginning my second year of English Literature A2. As part of our coursework module we have to produce 2500-3000 words in either analytical essay form or creative writing form (eg writing in the style of the books you have read) and this is on a central theme, and then 3 books/poems that relate to that theme. I have a few ideas of what theme and books I would like but what I'm looking for is some help or elaboration of book ideas for the themes I do have? My teacher said one has to be 'literary' or more of a classic, then the other 2 can be more modern in order to compare. My ideas: Racism/prejudice - The Help Dystopian novels/alternate reality - The Handmaid's Tale, and then something a hell of a lot more modern like one of the new young adult dystopia books e.g Matched, The Hunger Games etc History - I'm very naive on this subject but I love Philippa Gregory and have an avid interest in historical fiction And of course any themes or books you wonderful people suggest! I am so grateful to anyone who takes the time to help out a newbie on here!
  5. So happy to finally join a forum like this. I read mostly non fiction, history, Presidential Memoirs, Political Most recent 3: "Lincoln" - David Herbert Donald "Seal Team Six" - Howard Wasdin "Courage and Consequence" - Karl Rove
  6. The English Village by Martin Wainwright Michael O'Mara Books 2011 Warm, charming, quintessentially English, rambling, full of colour - Martin Wainwright is all these and more which is why The English Village is such a delightful book to read. This is not a historical reference book - how could it be at just 192 pages - and makes only a vague attempt to mention all aspects of villages and village life from their origins to the present day. Rather Mr Wainwright - Northern Editor of The Guardian - dips into the subject like a kid in Mrs Miggin's sweet shop and picks out some of the brighter and tastier bits of trivia. If anything, an attempt to impose a structure on this book forces Mr Wainwright to talk at too much length about some of the duller aspects of village life and the reader welcomes his return to the fireside-chat style at which the author excels. There are also some laugh out loud moments: "...or at Mavis Enderby in Lincolnshire, whose shared sign with a neighbouring village is often converted by wags to read: 'To Old Bolingbroke and Mavis Enderby - the gift of a son'." But for the most part this is a book which will just keep you smiling. He takes a look at the role of the church, of festivals, of horticulture, of architecture and of the pub - but can't resist wandering off down Trivia Lane when the fancy takes him. And these meanderings down't lonnin are the best parts of the book. Here he muses on the truth behind the romantic image of the village and its possible soundtrack: "Sentimental paintings of rosy-cheeked maidens at the gates of their cottages, which do indeed tend to have Jane Austen's green-painted shutters and hollyhocks abounding in their gardens, should really be studied with a soundtrack of terminal coughing from a tuberculosis victim indoors, and a scratch-and-sniff facility to release the stink of ordure, rotting food and drains." Passing references to hollyhocks, community-run pubs and English 'model villages' abroad only whet the reader's appetite to explore further the many aspects of the English village. The brevity of the book reflects the wide-angle lens approach to the subject with the occasional zooming in on the strange or charming side of English village life an echo of Mr Wainwright's Guardian-sized features on said topics. The only frustration is a feeling at the end of the book that we haven't really stayed long enough in one place to fully get to know the nooks, crannies and characters which really go to make up the English village. I can't help thinking back to my home village: Old Bilton, near Rugby in Warwickshire. I can instantly recall so many aspects of the village life that Mr Wainwright barely touches on (if at all): The sweet shop, the village green, the post office, the shops and shopkeepers, the ghosts, the tragedies, the legends of hidden treasure, the pranks, the buttercross, the village characters, the Derby and Joan club, the schools, Magnet Lane, Old Tom, bonfire night, New Year's Eve - and so it goes on. It's of no matter. It's the title of the book that's not quite right rather than the content or the way it's written ('Aspects of an English Village' might have been better). I just hope it's not too long before Mr Wainwright publishes a sequel: Old Bilton - An English Village might be a good one.
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