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      Signing Up   11/06/2018

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    • Hayley

      February Supporter Giveaway   02/07/2019

      February already! And with February comes the next supporter giveaway. This month, with great thanks once again to www.thestorygift.co.uk , we have a brilliantly bookish set of 'storyteller' pencils (featuring famous first lines) and a retro library card notebook!      As always, you'll be automatically entered into the giveaway if you support the forum on patreon, or if your pre-patreon membership is still active. If you want to be involved in the giveaway but don't currently support, you can join the patreon at any point in February here:  www.patreon.com/bookclubforum . 

Hayley

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About Hayley

  • Rank
    Addicted!
  • Birthday 04/25/1992

Profile Information

  • Reading now?
    The Eyre Affair - Jasper Fforde
  • Gender
    Female
  • Location:
    Birmingham (UK)
  • Interests
    Apart from reading, I like playing the guitar and writing sometimes :)

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    bookclubforum.co.uk

Recent Profile Visitors

3,203 profile views
  1. Busy reading

    Thanks @Athena and @Busy_Bee, I’ll definitely start with ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?’ then!
  2. Willoyd's Reading 2019

    I love Dickens, particularly for his multifarious subplots, so this sounds like just my type of book! Extra satire and more realistic characters can only be a good thing.
  3. new here!

    Hi Polly, welcome to the forum! Do you have any particular favourite authors (other than Joyce )?
  4. Ulysses by James Joyce

    I didn’t love Ulysses, to be honest, but I would say it depends on how you want to read it @Angury. To appreciate it purely for the way it’s written, the way that it flows and how experimental Joce was being, even by modernist standards, you wouldn’t need a guide, I think it might even get in the way a bit. To get a good understanding of what’s actually happening, a guide is a good idea because it is really challenging. I didn’t have a guide and I ended up re-reading sections quite a lot, trying to work out what I was missing, and that probably didn’t help me to like it.
  5. Hayley's Reading 2019

    Heroes of Welsh History by David Oates 2/5 - It was okay I found this book on a market stall in Hay-on-Wye, I loved the cover and I know there are some great Welsh myths and legends, so I had to get it. It's really not what I expected at all though, which I suppose isn't really the books fault. Essentially it is a book that was printed for school age children to learn about the history of Wales. This edition was printed in June 1928 and the age definitely shows. The heroes are all considered notable for battles, or at least the way they influenced battles (some of which just seemed like they were a bit petty all round and could have been avoided - but they're presented as heroic anyway). There are no women, only as briefly mentioned wives, or Ceridwen, who is mentioned in the only story to feature anything magical or mythological at all, but only because she's necessary to the beginning of the story of Taliesin. I'm not sure how accurate the overall history was either, the sources being a bit sketchy to say the least. There are a lot of heartfelt comments about the spirit of liberty and the final chapter finishes with 'the last hero of Welsh independence.' I found this unusual, but interesting (probably the most interesting thing about the book, actually). There's a definite sense of loss, even though Wales had been part of the UK for a very long time before this book was published, and I wouldn't have expected that from a text book. So, overall, from a historical point of view, it had some interesting features, but it wasn't actually a great book to read and I did struggle through it. The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden 4.5/5 - I loved it I'm only taking 0.5 points away from this book because I loved the first one just a tiny bit more. Being the second book in a trilogy, this one did feel a bit like an in-between, like it was setting up what's to come in the final book (exciting things, by the sound of it!). I just love the mix of folklore, magic and medieval Russia in these books. I love discovering new features of folklore and fairytale as they appear in the world, never seeming out of place despite the otherwise realistic settings. Vasya is a great character, with the right balance of fierceness and vulnerability to make her relatable but heroic. In the same way, although there's a powerful message about fighting against expectations, the book has a realistic approach to the consequences of choosing to fight back. The world is a harsh place, and things don't just fall into place in a fairy-tale way. Also, look how pretty the cover is! It's just a beautiful book, inside and out.
  6. Busy reading

    I've never read anything by Philip K. Dick but feel like I really need to. Do you think Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? would be a good place to start? You've given me new motivation to pick up Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, great review
  7. That's exactly the same thing I was most surprised about! I thought it made the book feel very different in the end too.
  8. Great reviews Gaia! The second book is definitely better visually, even the front cover looks a lot more appealing. I'm glad you enjoyed them Regarding your 'black and white thinking' question, I've never heard it used in terms of the mind before, but it's a common expression in the UK to say 'it's not black and white' when talking about a problem. Like you said, it's about extremes, so it's meant to mean essentially the same thing as 'it's not one extreme or the other.' I don't think this is in any way a comment on race as it's not referring to skin colour, but to the literal extremes of the colour spectrum, neither of which could be skin colours. I do understand why the phrase made you feel uncomfortable though, and I think maybe it's because it was being applied to people, or at least to people's thoughts, and when we think of black and white in terms of people we do associate it with skin colour, even if that's not what the author meant. And if we think of the term 'black and white thinking' in terms of race, it would become awful and definitely racist. On a non-book related note, your dog is gorgeous and I love your 'chemistry is awesome' top
  9. Willoyd's Reading 2019

    How are you finding The Way We Live Now? It's a book that's been on my to-read list for quite a while.
  10. I agree completely with your Frost Fair review. I've read some of Marston's 'Railway Detective' books since I read Frost Fair and they're quite similar, good mysteries, fun to read but don't have a great deal of depth. I'm glad I'm not the only one who was surprised to learn that there are actually two Little Women books, both of which are included in the film version. I think the book is worth reading, because it's interesting in its historical context (when Jo actually seems a lot more rebellious) but I agree it is painfully twee by modern standards.
  11. Hi, good to see you back! 1 ‘loved it’ and 3 ‘liked it’ books isn’t a bad start to the year. It’s a shame about Cuckoo though, it must have been really bad for you not to even give it an ‘it was okay!’ Life’s Library sounds interesting, I hope you get some good books from it!
  12. Shakespeare

    It's a comedy!? I mainly remember the 'pound of flesh' parts and that wasn't what I'd call comedic!
  13. I can't wait to read The Winter of the Witch but I also don't want the trilogy to be over! I haven't read Where the Crawdad's Sing yet either. I'm planning to try to get The Winter of the Witch from Waterstones on Sunday, so I'll see if they have Where the Crawdad's Sing while I'm there
  14. I would say that perhaps the only difference between Burns' detachment from the personal and your own example is that the first represents a detached perspective of the public world, while the latter is a detached perspective of the private and individual life. Interesting from a psychological point of view in both cases though. Does detachment help us to see things more clearly, with less distraction, or is it a coping mechanism in the face of complex and potentially painful issues? It could be both, I suppose. I like your poem, it has a really satisfying rhythm that helps give a real sense of movement, and a great representation of texture and sound
  15. February already! And with February comes the next supporter giveaway. This month, with great thanks once again to www.thestorygift.co.uk , we have a brilliantly bookish set of 'storyteller' pencils (featuring famous first lines) and a retro library card notebook! As always, you'll be automatically entered into the giveaway if you support the forum on patreon, or if your pre-patreon membership is still active. If you want to be involved in the giveaway but don't currently support, you can join the patreon at any point in February here: www.patreon.com/bookclubforum .
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