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Readwine

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Everything posted by Readwine

  1. 'Palace Walk' Naguib Mahfouz

    Glad you enjoyed it. This on my TBR Pile as well as Midaq Alley by the same author. I did not buy all the books of THe Cairo Trilody as I wanted to see how the first one went. Sounds promising. Thanks for the review
  2. Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts

    I gave up on it too, but is still on TBR pile. At the time it appeared too long-winded and my edition also had tiny print. We'll see if it get read
  3. You may try these. Quite a mixture: Charlotte Gray by Sebastian Faulks (21) Resistance: A Woman's Journal of Struggle and Defiance in… by Agnes Humbert (10) Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac (6) Suite Fran
  4. I just finished compiling my TBR Pile which is over 60 books in strength. I find myself, however, not making much progress on it since last year as I keep buying new books - most of them from recommendations on this forum. My Pile is growing :motz:My budget is diminishing Do you suffer from this terrible malady as well? Any suggestions? Calls for discipline and leaving the BCF?(yeah right) One good thing at least, I have finally rid myself of the horrific guilt of book-quiting Too much time wasted in finishing a book I do not want to read.
  5. The Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova Blurb from Barnes & Noble: Psychiatrist Andrew Marlowe has a perfectly ordered life--solitary, perhaps, but full of devotion to his profession and the painting hobby he loves. This order is destroyed when renowned painter Robert Oliver attacks a canvas in the National Gallery of Art and becomes his patient. In response, Marlowe finds himself going beyond his own legal and ethical boundaries to understand the secret that torments this genius, a journey that will lead him into the lives of the women closest to Robert Oliver and toward a tragedy at the heart of French Impressionism. Ranging from American museums to the coast of Normandy, from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth, from young love to last love, THE SWAN THIEVES is a story of obsession, the losses of history, and the power of art to preserve human hope. First, I must thank Peacefield for recommending this book. Thank you, I loved it. It is a beautifully written
  6. New Books vs. TBR Pile

    Great suggestions for my malady: Increased TBR pile allows you to have a greater amount of books to choose from depending on your mood Avoid bookstores and if not go in blindfolded Avoid going online and if not tie your hands behind your back Finish the last batch before you order/buy more Seek help from Bookaholics Anonymous Accept that I will never read all of the books I own - this is the one I am going to try. God, grant me the serenity to accept all the books I want The courage to read all of them And the wisdom to quit reading the ones I struggle with
  7. Rogue, thou has't lived too long. Anthony and Cleopatra I love it for the next jerk that cuts me off
  8. If You Get to Heaven.....

    God says "You get to take care of all the dogs in Heaven and yes, they are allowed up on my couch"
  9. an inconsequential tangent thereby....
  10. Endless List of Authors

    Griff Rhys-Jones
  11. The 'Find That Picture' Game

    Too sweet! Retired racing greyhound doing a silly dance
  12. 'Like Water for Chocolate' Laura Esquivel

    This has been one of my most favourite books. So original and as you say Sirinrob a very enjoyable story.
  13. It has only been recently that I have assuaged my guilt of book-quiting (and it was a strong one). There are just so many books out there to enjoy. I may pick up these again when in the proper mood : Birdsong The Dante Club The Interpretation of Murder Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell
  14. Who/Where Are You?

    I am a psychiatrist/painter doing all I can for an artist/patient obsessed with a dead person
  15. Kylie's Literary Adventures In 2010

    Great review. Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Sounds just up my alley.
  16. Finished TOBG last week. I don't think I've read a 600+ page book as fast as this one. It was my first introduction to Gregory and now I am hooked. She really brings her characters to life and makes the reader really engage with them. I could actually feels Anne's exhaustion and Mary's defeatist personality - she had no choice really than to please everyone. How lucky we women are today!
  17. Readwine's Reads 2010

    Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane Blurb from Publisher
  18. Shutter Island By Dennis Lehane

    Blurb from Publisher’s Weekly: Lehane's new novel, his first since the highly praised and bestselling Mystic River, carries an ending so shocking yet so faithful to what has come before, that it will go down as one of the most aesthetically right resolutions ever written. But as anyone who has read him knows, Lehane, despite his mastery of the mechanics of suspense, is about much more than twists; here, he's in pursuit of the nature of self-knowledge and self-deception, and the ways in which both can be warped by violence and evil. In summer 1954, two U.S. marshals, protagonist Teddy Daniels and his new partner, Chuck Aule, arrive on Shutter Island, not far from Boston, to investigate the disappearance of patient Rachel Solando from the prison/hospital for the criminally insane that dominates the island. The marshals' digging gets them nowhere fast as they learn of Rachel's apparently miraculous escape past locked doors and myriad guards, and as they encounter roadblocks and lies strewn across their path-most notably by the hospital's chief physician, the enigmatic J. Cawley-and pick up hints of illegal brain surgery performed at the hospital. Then, as a major hurricane bears down on the island, inciting a riot among the insane and cutting off all access to the mainland, they begin to fear for their lives. All of the characters-particularly Teddy, haunted by the tragic death of his wife-are wonderful creations, but no more wonderful than the spot-on dialogue with which Lehane brings them to life and the marvelous prose that enriches the narrative. There are mysteries within mysteries in this novel, some as obvious as the numerical codes that the missing patient leaves behind and which Teddy, a code breaker in WWII, must solve; some as deep as the most profound fears of the human heart. There is no mystery, however, about how good this book is; like Mystic River, it's a tour de force. I do not agree with Publisher’s Weekly that this book is “a tour de force.” This is my first novel by Lehane and I must admit I was not all that impressed. The setting is very original – maximum security mental institution – which allows for good fodder for character development. Add to this a hurricane and the tension ripens fairly well in the book. Lehane’s protagonist grows on you, as does his partner (great humor). Unfortunately, the constant referral to the death of Teddy’s wife was a little tedious (“we get it already” I kept thinking). There are twists in the novel, but the main one was really no surprise to me as I sort of figured it out. Perhaps I just got lucky. I have not seen the film but I have a sneaking suspicion the story will work much better in the film than the book. I give it a 6/10
  19. Endless List of Authors

    Simon Montefiore
  20. Home is a Wounded Heart - Neil Diamond
  21. Endless List of Authors

    Kjell Eriksson
  22. Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes - Stephen Jay Gould
  23. Readwine's Reads 2010

    Poppyshake, I really hope you enjoy the Pie book as much as I did. I just thought it was delightful and a welcomed change after reading "heavy subject" books. I always hate giving a weak review to a book as I am always afraid that it will discourage people, but that is why I love the BCF as one can get a real sense from other people's opinions. I am not sure how Wolf Hall would pan out in the audiobook format as Mantel's use of the word "he" is so misguiding especially in her dialogues: for example, in a conversation scenario: Wolsey says "bla bla bla" Thomas More says "bla bla bla" He says "bla bla bla" The reader then has to figure out if it is More continuing to speak or maybe Wolsey and by the end of paragraph you figure out that Cromwell is actually in the conversation. Ugggh. In an audiobook, I think you would have to constantly rewind. At any rate, enough of that. Hope you really enjoy Pie. Sweet!
  24. Readwine's Reads 2010

    Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel Blurb from Publisher
  25. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel

    Blurb from Publisher
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