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Booknutt

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About Booknutt

  • Rank
    Settling In
  • Birthday June 8

Profile Information

  • Reading now?
    How far to Bethlehem? by Norah Lofts
  • Gender
    Female
  • Location:
    Cheshire, U.K.
  • Interests
    Reading(!) - anything not too scary, and mostly fiction/historical/sci-fi. Also into Spiritual healing for people, creatures, and our world through the White Eagle Lodge, and likewise subjects in books. Handcrafts - cross stitch, embroidery or tapestry, mostly.
  1. I usually try to think positive, but I'm starting this topic with a heartfelt Grumble - so bear with me gentlefolk. My home city - a city, mark you - has lost it's main Public Library. As I'm not making a political statement or running for Council, I'll be discreet and call us Libraryless City for these purposes. The facility has had its stock reduced by about half and moved into the nooks and corners of the local cinema and theatre building. I do mean nooks and corners too, we trek around the building to get to different sections, a large selection being located in the public cafe! It's cramped, and a nightmare for anyone using the computers - readers constantly passing behind and anyone free to read your business. No privacy for study or personal business. Perhaps worst of all there is no security to protect the stock we do have. If anyone in the cafe for instance decided to finish the book they've plucked from the shelves at home, there's nothing to stop them drifting out with it, and no way to trace it. There is also no way to secure the stock when the traditional main hours are over, and the library staff gone. While the building itself is open, access to the stock is free for all. Because, of course, this is a cinema and theatre, purpose-renovated, not a library building at all. I think it's a massive shame for Libraryless City to be left with this shambles, plus a couple of small branch facilities on the outskirts ... but hey! the Children's Section is popular ( I do agree that's a big plus) so the adults can just cope. Yeah? Not yeah! Big No! Many local people have been members since childhood, or depend on a library to provide inexpensive educational or recreational books etc, It's a big blow for adults on a low income, or students, or the elderly, or people in-the-middle like me. In short, the kind of people Public Libraries were established for, in the first place. Of course this reduction of such facilities (and their expenses) is widespread in the U.K. lately. Libraryless City is not alone, and indeed better off, some may say, than smaller communities. In all cases, it's still a kick in the teeth for the adults for whom a visit to their Library was inexpensive "me" time in their lives. A place of peace, pleasure, education and gathering with like-minded people ... Gone. Thanks for bearing with my views on this, friends. On this occasion "progress" is a bitch!
  2. She Who Remembers by Linda Lay Shuler

    OK I admit it, I've had "She who remembers" on my Kindle for ages - unread! It just seems to be one of those books I intend to read "after this one" but keep getting sidetracked! So far Frankie you're the only of us to follow through but I'm determined to read at least the first one ... As soon as I've finished my current book.
  3. World Without End - Ken Follett

    Can't say I like Column of Fire as much as the two previous "Kingsbridge" novels, but it's still a good read. Yeah, Virginia, I like something to really sett!e into too.
  4. Barbara Erskine

    I enjoyed the length, Madeleine, but then the story quite fascinated me. We stepped a little further along the spiritual path this time - I've fol!owed that particular thread with interest right from Lady of Hay. What's your final verdict then?
  5. ROMANCE!

    To add to the suggestions ... How could I forget Mary Stewart?! Her "Nine Coaches Waiting" is a big favourite, but I've read quite a few of her thriller\romances. Perhaps under the heading of "historicals" now, as they're set around the 1940's-ish but interesting adventures, too. Give her a spin you may enjoy her.
  6. ROMANCE!

    Zeminder wasn't a great success 😯 Our hero doesn't even appear till 20% into the book, but the heroine obsessed about him for most of the previous pages, which I actually got bored with! Might give it another try sometime else?
  7. Things in books that annoy you

    Sorry about the gaff - you both look so alike! 😊
  8. Things in books that annoy you

    Oops sorry! It's also annoying when something is read wrongly, isn't it?
  9. Barbara Erskine

    Times Legacy is my own 2nd favourite, at last! Up till then every new Erskine novel I read was the new 2nd "favourite"(), and Child of the Phoenix is in first, first p!ace! Anyone else reading or read " Sleepers Castle"?
  10. ROMANCE!

    Trying "Zemindar" by Valerie Fitzgerald. Slow to start, as there's a bit of explanation about India pre-mutiny by one character to another, but looking promising. Have noticed that there's quite a choice of stories about this time and place to choose from. A pity in a way that authors tend to "jump on the bandwagon" - all it takes is one success, and all follow suit. After this, I'll sniff about for other locations. Happy reading, All.
  11. World Without End - Ken Follett

    Got it on paperback already, folks! I ordered one hardback and one paperback accidentally while doing my dithering. Which actually is just as well as the hardback is pretty weighty and I was finding it difficult to hold comfortably, especially with my weaker left wrist.( A point to remember if you may buy this for anyone who has hand\wrist problems as a gift.) The print in the paperback is smallish but readable so I'll be able to make better progress, now. Still getting settled into the characters at present, but there's plenty of book left to get to know them. Happy reading, all book fans out there
  12. World Without End - Ken Follett

    Anyone read Column of Fire (3rd Kingsbridge novel) yet? Just got it in hardback today after a serious dither between that or Kindle. Getting it started tonight!
  13. ROMANCE!

    Thanks, Poppy. I've never actually explored R.F.D. before. Jane Austen and Wuthering Heights have a!so come to mind, but they're o!d pals already. Anyone got anymore?
  14. ROMANCE!

    I am completely unashamed in starting this topic! If it's sex you're looking for (quite nice in it's place) then this is a non starter, fellow reader. I'm in the mood for a romantic read, and apart from Gone with the Wind, a darn good historical novel and romance, I'm struggling. So - suggestions please. Plenty of smoulder, and a bit of sizzle is fine, but I'm looking for something about a relationship growing to special level as a main theme, historical or modern Ye Gods I've just thought of Barbara Cartland ... somebody help!
  15. I must confess I do take care what books I read in public - when I'm reading paper books, that is. I find my Kindle very useful if I want to keep a low profile, and can peacefully read books with for instance the word "virgin" in the title (crops up a lot in historical novels!) without someone inevitably starting a loud conversation about virgins, to the discomfort of many! Generally speaking though yes, I do find that people judge. If I read a "woman's book* (i.e. written by a woman) men take a glance, smile, and clearly judge me as lightweight " romantic". Women may take a look and be comfortable, or even start a chat (which I love) about favourite reads. Classic novels (by whoever) tend to make people think I'm studying for something and shouldn't be disturbed! Whodunnits seem to be generally acceptable whether written by male or female. Traditional " men's authors" like Wilbur Smith, frequently cause unrest among any blokes present, who seem to take offence that I'm reading something they'd choose themselves - ?! So you can see where a Kindle has its usefulness, in keeping a low profile. Yes, I find that people do judge a person on their book choices, but unfortunately as a race we tend to judge from outward appearances generally, when someone is a stranger to us. "Never judge a book by its cover" applies to people, too. Happy reading, All.
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