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    • Hayley

      Signing Up   11/06/2018

      Signing Up is once again available. New members are very welcome
    • Hayley

      June Supporter Giveaway   06/01/2019

      For the June giveaway I chose the theme 'The Gift of Reading.' One that I think we can all appreciate! The winner will receive four books, including:     The Gifts of Reading by Robert MacFarlane - 'An essay on the joy of reading, for anyone who has ever loved a book.'   plus three little short but (hopefully) thought provoking reading gifts...   The Reckoning by Edith Wharton - 'Two moving stories of love, loss, desire and divorce, from one of the great chroniclers of nineteenth-century New York life.' Create Dangerously by Albert Camus - 'Camus argues passionately that the artist has a responsibility to challenge, provoke and speak up for those who cannot in this powerful speech, accompanied here by two others.' It Was Snowing Butterflies by Charles Darwin - 'A selection of Darwin's extraordinary adventures during the voyage of the Beagle.'    As always, supporting members will be entered automatically into the random draw at the end of the month. If you want to be entered into the draw but don't support yet, you can do so here: https://www.patreon.com/bookclubforum   Good luck   

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  1. Past hour
  2. Muggle Not's Reading List - 2019

    Thanks. I have borrowed 20 books so far this year from the library, considerably less than usual. Our library allows us to keep 6 books on hold at a given time. I usually put a hold on the new releases and/or more popular books. I don't mind waiting for them to become available. There are many other books that I am interested in that are available immediately for me to download to my kindle while I wait on the others. Sometimes I will buy a book for my kindle if I want to keep the book or if I want to read it immediately. I usually purchase about 3 or 4 digital books a year. I really love libraries and believe they are a great source for books.
  3. It's sad that her books don't seem to improve! It was a fun read, it's a shame that the organization of the plot and characters wasn't better.
  4. Today
  5. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    I disagree with me too! I'm re-reading it right now, and am LOVING it.
  6. How many books have you read this year?

    Just finished number 21.
  7. Brian's Book Log - Ongoing

    I've recently read the 2nd book in the series, and thought it was better than the first one, although she still makes some silly mistakes, she obviously hasn't learned her lesson though. But this was a more coherent story, I thought.
  8. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    I greatly disagree with you about Wuthering Heights! I happen to find it one of the most passionate books out there! The intensity of the character's provides a great deal of interest to me! To quote from said book.... "I cannot live without my life; I cannot live without my soul!" We can draw so much desperation from Heathcliff it simply pours out of him towards the reader. Emily Bronte was connected to emotions in ways most writers can only hope to achieve. Perhaps I could agree if you stated her novels were over dramatic or had too much intensity to be real but I would simply point out the goal is to get the reader emotionally invested. Bronte sought a bolder approach to modern (at least at her time modern) writings by focusing on her characters emotions rather than relying solely on plot to get readers through her books. I happen to believe this is evident in her novel Wuthering Heights and she certainly proves her point! Stories are much more exciting when the reader is emotionally invested!
  9. Current Read

    Hi guys! I finished my previous novel and have started a new book! It is titled The Photograph by Penelope Lively. It appears to be a Today's book club selection. It is a shorter read but I'm using it to gear up for My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk, which will be a physiological puzzle questioning the meaning of life and what happens after death. Back to my present book, so far I have to admit it is intriguing! Typically any famous picks from "Oprah's book club" and things of that nature I do not enjoy, they come off too clean. Like there was no labor of love, just some schmuck at a computer typing away with little imagination beyond character's names. The plot lines already laid before the writer, void of challenges, of significant character development. However, this appears to be different. So far I've piece together its about a man's dead wife and her story after death provides many answers I believe, if alive, she would've been unable to provide the proper suspense with. For example, the novel The Husband's Secret by Liane Moriarty, her husband being alive ruined this book for me. It made the situation unevolved as opposed to if he had passed and she had to make her own choices based off of his previous ones. I believe The Photograph is going to do what The Husband's Secret couldn't and prove me with a thrilling suspenseful read. Any options on authors I've mentioned so far? Even if you don't agree I would love to begin an open discussion!
  10. Current Read

    Hi guys! I finished my previous novel and have started a new book! It is titled The Photograph by Penelope Lively. It appears to be a Today's book club selection. It is a shorter read but I'm using it to gear up for My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk, which will be a physiological puzzle questioning the meaning of life and what happens after death. Back to my present book, so far I have to admit it is intriguing! Typically any famous picks from "Oprah's book club" and things of that nature I do not enjoy, they come off too clean. Like there was no labor of love, just some schmuck at a computer typing away with little imagination beyond character's names. The plot lines already laid before the writer, void of challenges, of significant character development. However, this appears to be different. So far I've piece together its about a man's dead wife and her story after death provides many answers I believe, if alive, she would've been unable to provide the proper suspense with. For example, the novel The Husband's Secret by Liane Moriarty, her husband being alive ruined this book for me. It made the situation unevolved as opposed to if he had passed and she had to make her own choices based off of his previous ones. I believe The Photograph is going to do what The Husband's Secret couldn't and prove me with a thrilling suspenseful read. Any options on authors I've mentioned so far? Even if you don't agree I would love to begin an open discussion!
  11. My reading mojo remained pretty strong last week so I managed to finish off 2 more books. The Black Prince by Robby Robinson. This was loaned to me by one of the guys I work with. I'm not a fan of bodybuilding but the guy who lent it to me assured me that although Robby is a bodybuilder his story is interesting on its own and he wasn't wrong. Robby came from a poor background and found peace with a small group of friends who spent their time working out. Racism was never far away but he found an acceptance in the gym that wasn't readily available outside. Eventually he found his way into the top tier of bodybuilders and encountered corruption, more racism, and an industry widely controlled by one guy who pretty much decides who would be successful and who wouldn't. In an attempt to escape this he moved to Europe to continue to compete and do seminars with young bodybuilders. He also covers his frustrations and how modern bodybuilding has become a competition in who has got the best access to drugs. (4/5) The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist. I can't remember if I found this at work or bought it from a charity shop but I uncovered it while moving some books around at home. The basic premise is that the main character Dorrit moves into the Second Reserve Bank Unit on her 50th birthday. In the unit she is guaranteed to have a comfortable life with loads of things to do and similar people to keep her occupied. The catch is that the occupants are required to donate their time for experiments and their organs to others more important so as to be a benefit to society. Their time will come to an end when they are required to make 'the final donation' and they die. Although I enjoyed this book I was left wanting more from it. The premise is sooo good and is the exact kind of thing that really interests me but it just didn't quite work for me. I kept feeling like there was a message behind the story but for the life of me I just couldn't put my finger on it. There are clear divisions between those in the society who have children and those who don't but I have no idea what the underlying reason for this was. (2/5)
  12. I have to admit that I know nothing about it, I bought it on the strength that it was the Man Booker prize winner for 2018. I tend to avoid buying books based on awards wins but I do like to try to pick up books that are outside what I would usually read from time to time and this one jumped out at me. I still have my copy on the bookcase as I haven't got round to dropping it off at the charity shop yet. If you want to I'm happy to send it to you just drop me a PM with your email.
  13. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    The year is passing so quickly I can barely keep up. I've managed to finish 2 books last week, The Black Prince by Robby Robinson, and The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist.
  14. Going Paperless

    One thing I would suggest is that you keep a backup of anything important and don't rely solely on a cloud service. Although it is very rare, they can lose things and you could find yourself stuck without being able to retrieve what you need to. I'm sort of half and half, I use google calendar and have done for years. One of the things I like best is that you can set recurring tasks to automatically populate in the future. I am terribly forgetful so this helps to ensure I pay my bills etc when they are due each month. I also like the fact that I have it set up to send me an email each morning of what is due that day. Despite this I still tend to write daily to-do lists with the little things I need to do when I'm not working. I also keep loads of notebooks with various things in them. I have tried quite a few electronic ways of keeping notebooks but I can never stick with them as easy as I can an old school notebook.
  15. Yesterday
  16. Karen.d's Reading List 2019

    I read a Shari Lapena novel recently Karen, The Couple Next Door, which I think is her fourth book. It too, had a few problems with it that made it seem like a very amateur first novel. It was very predictable, the characters were very stereotyped, and it was easy to figure out the ending after only less than a quarter of the book. I was thinking about whether to try another of her books, but after reading your review I don't think I'll bother.
  17. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    Finished Georgina Howell's biography of Gertrude Bell, Daughter of the Desert, later renamed Queen of the Desert. A straight 6 stars, making it my 125th book at that level, and the 40th non-fiction book (also the first this year, although I'm thinking about another, but a novel). At a bit of a loss as to what to read next, as I almost always am after a book in which I've been so wrapped up.
  18. Your favourite Dinner choice?

    I can't live without seafood, so usually cook some rice or pasta with shrimps or/and mussels. Can recommend this Easy Shrimp Recipes, 20 minutes and healthy dinner is ready!
  19. Your Top 10 Authors!

    Tough one! I'm not a completist so I haven't read all of their works. But I've read enough to love these authors: 1. Vladimir Nabokov 2. Jose Rizal 3. Chinua Achebe 4. Milan Kundera 5. John Steinbeck 6. Kazuo Ishiguro 7. Junot Diaz 8. John Steinbeck 9. Guy de Maupassant 10. Haruki Murakami
  20. 'An Unwanted Guest'- Shari Lapena This is the first book I had read by Shari Lapena and I was surprised to find out this was her third book, because it feels like a first novel.I enjoyed the element of trying to work out who the killer was. However, I did have a problem with several elements within this book.Firstly, the dialogue at the beginning, is awful. You could tell that Lapena was trying to introduce each character using dialogue, but what she succeeded in doing, was creating forced, unnatural conversation. This does improve throughout the book though.Secondly for me, there were too many characters. At times, I got confused about who was who and had to keep referring to the beginning, to figure that out. I don't think that the characters were distinctive enough.I also found some of the decisions of the characters to be implausible and, things which seemed obvious to do, took nearly 200 pages for the characters to figure out.The ending for me was a bit weak. It felt like Shari Lapena wasn't exactly sure who the killer was herself. So as the book went on, the plot started to unravel. However, I did enjoy the little twist at the end.Judging by all of the criticisms I have about this novel, you would think that I hated it. However, despite it's many flaws, I quite enjoyed it. I might re-read 'An Unwanted Guest', but I have no intention of reading any more of Shari Lapena's books in the future. My Rating: ***
  21. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    I'm currently reading Peter F. Hamilton - Night's Dawn 3: The Naked God (re-read), which I have been reading for a few weeks now. I'm also reading Meg Wolitzer - The Female Persuasion.
  22. Some book reviews. Phil Earle (ill. Steve May) - Superdad's Day Off (a nice read) Tony De Saulles - Bee Boy 2: Attack of the Zombees (this was enjoyable) Paul van Loon (ill. Hugo van Look) - Dolfje Weerwolfje 19: Dolfje en Noura (liked the 2nd more than the 1rst half) Terri Libenson - Lakefront Middle School 2: Positively Izzy (this ending confused me a bit) Joe Sugg, Amrit Birdi, Matt Whyman, Mindy Lopkin and Joaquin Pereyra - Username 1: Username: Evie Joe Sugg, Amrit Birdi, Matt Whyman, Mindy Lopkin and Joaquin Pereyra - Username 2: Username: Regenerated (these two were nice but not great). Harriet Whitehorn (ill. Becka Moor) - Violet 3: Violet en de Smokkelaars (Violet 3: Violet and the Smugglers) (a nice read) Usborne, Russell Punter, Susanna Davidson, Alex Frith, Lesley Sims, Louie Stowell (ill. Matteo Pincelli, Linda Cavallini, Simona Bursi) - Geïllustreerde Verhalen uit de Griekse Mythologie (Illustrated Stories From the Greek Myths) (the illustrations were nice and it was nice to revisit these myths) Jiami Jongejan and Bouwien Jansen - Niet wat jij denkt (interesting anorexia memoir of a Dutch blogger & YouTuber) Robert Adkinson & Others - Spirituele Symbolen: Volkeren, Religies, Mysteries (Sacred Symbols: Peoples, Religions, Mysteries) (beautiful pictures, felt like it missed some things) Mason Deaver - I Wish You All The Best (I loved this book, non-binary main character Ben gets kicked out of their house by their parents after they come out) Taylor Jenkins Reid - The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo (a read out of my comfort zone, historical fiction detailing the life of (ficticious) movie star Evelyn Hugo. LGBT elements).
  23. Last week
  24. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    Finished Death in a Strange Country by Donna Leon.
  25. Your Book Activity - June 2019

    oh it's almost half of June! i'm currently reading Candida by Bernard Shaw and a book about HTML and Css in home. but in the library i started today with Sheltering Sky Paul Bowles and Failure Is Not an Option by Gene Kranz. I watched Wuthering Heights. hope you are enjoying reading your books this month!.
  26. Going Paperless

    I'm the same as Hayley. I prefer to have things on paper. They just seem more important or something that way. I have notebooks everywhere. I've just started researching a book and I could put everything on computer, but it doesn't feel like I've done anything if it's not on paper. Edited to add: At work I'm a typist. I type doctors letters, print them and send them out. Even though they typing on to computer is the biggest part of it, I don't feel I've done any work if I don't have paper copies of letters on my desk waiting to be sent.
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